Is this possible (need an experienced nurse's opinion-- warning a little long) - page 2

I think I'm a little nutty. I'm in a RN (ADN) program--- is it possible to get a job working only one weekend shift a month? Here's a little background. I'm a former high school social studies... Read More

  1. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Could you give a few more details? When did you begin your career? In what setting? I only worked full-time the first year myself; I never could stand to do bedside care full-time however, it would be extremely rare for a new grad with no experience to get a position working only one weekend a month. Let's not mislead the OP. You may have been able to do it but are you willing to admit that the chances of others doing that are extremely low.
    I agree, one weekend a month as a new grad would not be a likely find. I started 2 days a week in LTC. When I switched to acute care, I also worked only 2 days a week. My orientation, of course, was more than that to acute care.

    It's a moot point since the OP said she can work fulltime for the first year.
  2. by   SaderNurse05
    I know the hospitals in my area have started requiring at least 2 weekends per month and one major holiday as well as the very real possibility of being floated. The hospital's stance is it costs too much to mainain education requirements for people who only work one weekend per month, also that they want these people to be flexible with the changing patient population. I know several people who have quit their second job over this. I agree with the education AND nursing background you should be able to find a job you like. Good Luck!
  3. by   GooeyRN
    It depends on the area you live, and what area you want to work. I never worked a full-time nursing job, and I have been a nurse since 2001.

    My first job was per-diem in a nursing home. I could work as little as I wanted, as long as I gave them one weekend a month, one summer holiday and one winter holiday. So, I did get hired, but I don't recommend doing that. It was quite difficult. I would recommend working atleast 24 hours a week for a few months (maybe 3 months?) to get your feet wet and get used to a routine.

    My second job was part-time in a psych hospital. It worked out GREAT!!! I had a 24 hour a week position, but always picked up extra time. Too bad I had to leave when I got married and moved.

    I then switched to med-surg. Again, I worked part-time, 24 hours a week. I did a 2 week orientation at 40 hours a week before going to my regular schedule. It worked out fine. I left this job to have a baby. I then returned after a 14 month leave and only work now 8-10 hours a week. I have no problems.

    My mother works part-time as a nurse, and has a full-time job in IT. She never worked full time as a nurse, either. She also only had to do a 2 week full-time orientation before switching to a part-time schedule and is doing fine.

    You will find a position that suits you. I just recommend doing an orientation maybe during the summer months when you are off from teaching, so you have more time to devote to getting a routine down. Good luck! You can do both!
  4. by   luvmy3kids
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    In a word, NO. You will require at least one year of full-time experience as a nurse before you will be considered for part-time or per diem positions. That's pretty much universal, if you are able to get a schedule that you are talking about without at least one year of experience then that will be an extremely rare occurrence.

    I won't go into all the options you will have with a nursing degree and a teaching degree, suffice to say they are many. Good luck.
    Does this apply for a part-time position that would be 20-30 hrs a week? Or are you referring to just the one weekend a month?? This scares me because once I'm done with school, I cannot work full time. My husband travels nationally all week/every week and I cannot work full time with 3 kids and no husband at home. (this is just me personally.. I'm not saying it is physically impossible)

    I am having a panic attack right now because I've always planned on working part-time from the very beginning. Not necessarily one weekend a month, but more like 20-30 hrs a week.

    TIA
  5. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from luvmy3kids
    Does this apply for a part-time position that would be 20-30 hrs a week? Or are you referring to just the one weekend a month?? This scares me because once I'm done with school, I cannot work full time. My husband travels nationally all week/every week and I cannot work full time with 3 kids and no husband at home. (this is just me personally.. I'm not saying it is physically impossible)

    I am having a panic attack right now because I've always planned on working part-time from the very beginning. Not necessarily one weekend a month, but more like 20-30 hrs a week.

    TIA

    Well don't panic! I was really speaking more to the one weekend a month which is more like a per diem or prn position and I was also thinking of the hospital route. A part-time position might be possible after a full-time orientation. That's not set in stone of course, but that's the way it usually works. I notice a couple of people are saying that they started off part-time, but they both started off in LTC. That might be the way to go for you.
  6. by   jojotoo
    Quote from gonzo1
    After you graduate you can find a part time nursing job (most likely in a hospital). After you get some experience (work at least 20 hours per week if possible) then you will be able to go to work for a nursing agency and work virtually any time, any day you want.
    You will probably get hooked on nursing and want to do more than you are currently anticipating. There is a lot of patient education in nursing and it is very rewarding as well.
    Congratulations and good luck in your endeavors

    This sounds like the most accurate and encouraging advice that I've read. And depending on how bad the nursing shortage is where you are, an agency may hire you as soon as you graduate and pass boards. I know that we get registry nurses with very little experience. (I'm not saying that's a good thing for either them or us!) But you would be the absolute master of your schedule as an agency nurse.
  7. by   WestWingFan
    Thanks again!!! I just got home from clinicals, and I really loved it there. Maybe I'll just keep nursing and find a way to teach as a nurse--- we'll see. Thanks though--- lots to think about!!
  8. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Well don't panic! I was really speaking more to the one weekend a month which is more like a per diem or prn position and I was also thinking of the hospital route. A part-time position might be possible after a full-time orientation. That's not set in stone of course, but that's the way it usually works. I notice a couple of people are saying that they started off part-time, but they both started off in LTC. That might be the way to go for you.
    Good advice. LTC is a good way to ease into nursing.

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