Is this normal for first week of clinicals? - page 2

I posted this as a reply on another thread, but really, I have to ask you guys... Am I not gonna make this? Is this a normal FIRST DAY clinical experience? My first day of clinicals I was nervous... Read More

  1. by   sjoe
    TessRN2B--We look forward to one day being joined by a class that can stand up for itself and for each other! Nursing can learn a lot from your example, as you can see in these threads.
  2. by   nurseman
    At the school I went to we barely got to touch a patient on the very first day. I think that we did an orientation to the floor, helped with breakfast then put them to bed for their nap. After that we got into our group and talked about what we thought of the LTC facility and how the residents were treated. The second day we did a lot more but definitely not colostomies and tube feeds.
    I do agree with caliotter3, get a job in a LTC facility. The students in my class who did this had more confidence and when I started my clinical I regretted not having one. I
    Hope this time around is better. Lots of luck.
  3. by   Teshiee
    There is always one bytch who will make your clinical experience hell. I have learn to just get through the mess and keep my name out of her mouth. Some of those clinical instructors have a power trip, instead of teaching they terrorize, like they came out of their mommas azz with RN tattooed on their forehead. I had run ins but I finished and her comments did not phase me because when you take your boards you are a nurse they can't take that mess away from you. You are not stupid by no means if you are not familiar with things it always seem awkward at first. One patient told me I was all thumbs because I wasn't doing her colostomy care the way she was use to it, oh well first time but I did improve. You will do fine at the end of the tunnel. Don't let the PMS instructor dictate just play the game.
  4. by   P_RN
    Congrats of the 4.0. Congrats on finding a better school.

    She's lucky you didn't snatch her baldheaded after doing and saying that to you. I believe I would have considered it.

    Sheesh!!!! 40 years ago we had clinical skills classes BEFORE we ever did hands on care. We never did ANYTHING the first time without lab practice and then being observed 3x.
  5. by   Spazzy Nurse
    I feel for you, because I remember what it was like. My classmate and I would feel physically sick on our way to the hospital. I think some of these Nazi nursing instructors forget that they were once students too.

    You're not born knowing how to do this stuff...... in fact, you weren't born even just feeling comfortable doing it. It comes with time, and trust me, it won't be long before you feel better with it all. I promise.

    Your story reminded me of my first day on the LTC scene..... I properly knocked on my client's door at 6am and called out, "Mildred, it's Kerri, may I come in???" just like the books had instructed me to do. I walked in the room, turned on a tiny light, and washed my hands, just like the books had instructed me to do. I walked over to her bed and saw a sight I will never forget. There was a giant, snoring elderly woman with long, dirty gray hair, laying in bed....... with one finger in her nose, and the other hand down the front of her pants, yes--- in her _______. I NEVER EVER READ ANYTHING ABOUT THIS IN THE BOOKS!!!!!!! I will never forget the horror I felt at that exact moment. I had no idea what to do, and I would soon find out that the odor would completely overpower sight I had just observed.

    One good thing about doing LTC first is that it teaches you to have a strong stomach and to be able to move fast..... 2 very valuable qualities for a good nurse to have.

    As for you taking your client for a walk outdoors---- you are probably the first person to do that for her in a long, long time. That was the most wonderful thing you could have done.

    My advice--- continue using the same brain and the same heart that you are using right now..... bite your tongue at times and fight back tears if need be...... everything will totally fall into place and you will feel so much more at ease in no time at all. You really will.
    Stay strong!!!!
  6. by   Dr. Kate
    Isn't it a shame that you're never so alone in nursing as when you're just starting out. After 3-4 weeks of clinicals, or a new job, you know the strengths and weakness of your coworkers, your teachers/boss and are better able to cope.
    I know it doesn't help to say this but you will remember this and it will make you better for having happened. It will also be one of those funny/tragic stories you tell newbies.
    Until then, keep the faith, and remember if the worst happens early you can only go up from there.
  7. by   SthRNBelle
    First I send encouragement your way!! At first it is a living hell especially seeing the way that some people are treated in LTC. It is depressing and you will hate it, but you have to get through it. Two years from now when you graduate you will look back and think..."what a joke". I was worried about all that crap and now look how much i have learned. It seriously is like 6 weeks of bootcamp. But, you can make it and you will make it. I had a professor much the same as you did. But you just have to get pissed off then just suck it up and show them that you can do it. Because you can do it...and you will. And when you get that "RN" behind your name it will all be worth it. Also, when the days seem endless, just think what a difference you are making in these LTC peoples' lives. If you weren't there to have to give baths and change diapers, it probably wouldn't get done...and thats the truth. It always happens that students get the most difficult patients, simply because a lot of the staff "dont want to deal with them". So just put on a smile and remember that you are making a difference in someone life!!
    Amy RN-BSN
    Last edit by SthRNBelle on May 27, '04
  8. by   SthRNBelle
    Quote from Vsummer1
    I want to thank each and every one of you for your support. I really need it! I wasn't sure I could do this again, but after reading your responses I see that all I really need to do is not specialize in LTC.

    Who knows though? Maybe it could be my niche!

    Thanks again...

    First I send encouragement your way!! At first it is a living hell especially seeing the way that some people are treated in LTC. It is depressing and you will hate it, but you have to get through it. Two years from now when you graduate you will look back and think..."what a joke". I was worried about all that crap and now look how much i have learned. It seriously is like 6 weeks of bootcamp. But, you can make it and you will make it. I had a professor much the same as you did. But you just have to get pissed off then just suck it up and show them that you can do it. Because you can do it...and you will. And when you get that "RN" behind your name it will all be worth it. Also, when the days seem endless, just think what a difference you are making in these LTC peoples' lives. If you weren't there to have to give baths and change diapers, it probably wouldn't get done...and thats the truth. It always happens that students get the most difficult patients, simply because a lot of the staff "dont want to deal with them". So just put on a smile and remember that you are making a difference in someone life!!
    Amy RN-BSN
  9. by   Nurse_Ben
    Get real and welcome to nursing!

close