Is there REALLY a nursing shortage? - page 18

This is an interesting article guys/gals... Here's the letter I wrote to the President, Vice-President, U.S. Congress Rep. and Senator: "I'm an R.N. and I recently started working as an agency... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from postmortem_cowboy
    Duely notable Mud, and there's not a whole lot we can do about it either. I'd love to see a true union come to california, one that will actually do something more than just be a figure for the public and actually be a voice of working nurses.
    Actually, California does have a powerful nurses union. However, they protect the interests and freedoms of RNs. California LVNs are not even on the radar screen for unionization or protection, which is possibly the reason why you were unaware that such a union existed for nurses.
  2. by   postmortem_cowboy
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Actually, California does have a powerful nurses union. However, they protect the interests and freedoms of RNs. California LVNs are not even on the radar screen for unionization or protection, which is possibly the reason why you were unaware that such a union existed for nurses.
    Yeah that helps doesn't it???


    Wayne.
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    I am so shocked to see that any nurse, LPN or RN would have difficulty finding work...I guess it really does depend on where you live. New York has jobs left and right. Private hospitals have not hired LPNs as in the past, but city hospitals do, corrections, assisted living, home care and other agencies take them in a heart beat. However, it is also true that our unions are not as strong and we take a beating in salary and respect depending on where you go. At times, the LPN may be looked upon as a 'scab' so to speak, in the eyes of an RN because if we get to do the job for cheap, it diminishes the professional career of the RN. I hope things look up, Wayne. Out of curiousity, Wayne, what agency did you work for as a flu nurse?
  4. by   gentlegiver
    Quote from TheCommuter

    There is no nursing shortage. There are over 2.5 million registered nurses in America in addition to the 700,000 licensed practical/vocational nurses. Therefore, there are more than enough currently licensed nurses in this country to solve the so-called 'nursing shortage'.
    Finally someone has the courage to say it like it is! AMEN and thank you!
  5. by   gentlegiver
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Actually, California does have a powerful nurses union. However, they protect the interests and freedoms of RNs. California LVNs are not even on the radar screen for unionization or protection, which is possibly the reason why you were unaware that such a union existed for nurses.

    Is there a Union for LPN's??? If not WHY?? And how do we go about forming one NATION-WIDE??!!
  6. by   BigB
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I completed a Los Angeles area LVN program about 16 months ago and, at the same time, numerous other schools in Southern California were churning out new LVN grads every few months. Jobs in your area will continue to be sparse for LVNs unless these schools were to finally stop flooding the market with new nurses.

    This is just my $0.02 on the issue at hand.
    I think its a california thing. There are just tons of LVN schools with graduates coming out of the woodworks. It seems the jobs here are becoming hard to find.
  7. by   linzz
    You know Big B, I think you are right about the schools churning out too many LPN's. This is also a problem in certain areas here in Ontario, Canada. Some underserviced areas have a big need for LVN's. In areas that are not underserviced, it is very difficult to find full time work that is permanent that isn't putting your licence on the line. Of our two local hospitals, one hires no LPN's and the other hires very few. This of course crowds up other areas, LTC facilities, etc. I will tell anyone I know not to pursue being an LVN in the area I live in, just go straight for the RN so that you won't starve. I am going for my RN because I need to work. I would love to stary an LVN but I just can't afford to. So, no I would say that there is no nursing shortage here, only a shortage of nurses who will not work in facilities that staff in very unsafe ratios.
  8. by   Fiona59
    You know, I've been wondering about schools lately. It used to be you had to go through the vocational college to do the PN, now community colleges and private colleges are starting to train as well.

    Sprott Shaw in BC turned out some of the least skilled PN's I've ever worked with. It's like they went to areas of high unemployment, signed up people who EI would pay for, and went to town. Remember the govt. won't pay for an unemployed person to get a degree, Linzz, but they will pay for PN training. I know this because I left my training roughly $10K in debt as did several of my classmate in my age range (divorces, sahm's wanting to get into the workforce), while several classmembers left debt free due to UIC paying the fees...
  9. by   linzz
    Yes it certainly is unfair that you have to pay for your schooling while your taxes pay for someone else to get a free ride. We also had many in my program that were getting many, many perks that those of us (myself included) who were paying our own way, did not get. We had students that got free laptops, expensive stethescopes all courtesy of the Ontario government.:angryfire
  10. by   Mudwoman
    Our state BON approved Medication Aides 2 years ago for nursing homes. Recently the bi-monthly newsletter talked about what a success the program has been and they are looking at expanding it in some instances for hospitals. 3 of the largest hospitals in the state have decided to go back to primary care with RN's having up to 5 patients and having a CNA that will have 10 pts. No LPN's. Children's hospital in Little Rock is advertising for RN's, but with a catch. The job has no benefits and is for 13 weeks at a time----contract labor. Look for this to be the wave of the future. We will probably "bid" for the work out there and it will go to the lowest bidder.

    LPN's here are having a hard time finding work and salaries are declining. Classic evidence that there is no shortage. We don't even have any private LPN schools. Just the local comm college.
  11. by   Mudwoman
    Quote from gentlegiver
    Is there a Union for LPN's??? If not WHY?? And how do we go about forming one NATION-WIDE??!!
    No unions because most states passed laws that said they are "right to work" states. The unions can't enforce anything when the state has these laws and the minute that workers strike, they are fired with no recourse.
  12. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from TheCommuter
    My statements will probably be construed as controversial, but here goes.

    There is no nursing shortage. There are over 2.5 million registered nurses in America in addition to the 700,000 licensed practical/vocational nurses. Therefore, there are more than enough currently licensed nurses in this country to solve the so-called 'nursing shortage'.

    Here are the problems. A huge portion of these licensed nurses are not working. Many of these licensed nurses abandon the nursing field altogether due to burnout, poor working conditions, and other issues that deserve some sociological research. Additionally, our greatest healthcare needs are at the bedside, but there are too many nurses in management and not enough who are willing to do the 'dirty work' at the bedside. In other words, there are too many 'chiefs' and not enough 'indians'.

    There is no shortage of nurses; rather, there's a shortage of nurses who will put up with the crap at the bedside. There's also a shortage of master's-educated nursing instructors. In addition, nursing pay rates will drop if nursing schools admit and graduate a whole flood of new nurses to fill this so-called 'shortage'.
    I am one of those nurse managers that gets her hands dirty. Would never ask someone to to something I am not willing to do.
  13. by   OgopogoLPN
    Quote from Fiona59
    You know, I've been wondering about schools lately. It used to be you had to go through the vocational college to do the PN, now community colleges and private colleges are starting to train as well.

    Sprott Shaw in BC turned out some of the least skilled PN's I've ever worked with. It's like they went to areas of high unemployment, signed up people who EI would pay for, and went to town. Remember the govt. won't pay for an unemployed person to get a degree, Linzz, but they will pay for PN training. I know this because I left my training roughly $10K in debt as did several of my classmate in my age range (divorces, sahm's wanting to get into the workforce), while several classmembers left debt free due to UIC paying the fees...



    Grrrr.........this is a huge beef with me as well!! I know someone who knows a nurse who teaches at Sprott Shaw. She said that while the majority of the students are there because they want to be an LPN and want to learn, there are a few there because social services is paying their way and they only show up to satisfy social services, or their payments are cut off. They could care less about being an LPN.

    Hey, I wish someone would step in and pay for my education and living expenses while I take my course.

    And I've heard, for the most part, TERRIBLE things about Sprott Shaw College, the instructors, the poor quaility of instruction and the students are very undertrained when they come out. And not just the LPN course, but many, many of the courses.

    And, my tuition including books, fees and EVERYTHING will cost me $7100. Sprott Shaw is $21,000 , but it's a lot easier to get into.

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