Is there power in the color white? - page 17

Hi all. I'm looking for some opinions on whether you believe that returning to wearing all white uniforms might give us back some power. Now let me explain power. I've been an RN for 21 years and... Read More

  1. by   sweetface
    Quote from ruby vee
    with all due respect, sweetface, you're just starting nursing school. the experience you're relying on to give legitimacy to your argument is, by your own admission, experience as a patient. not as an educated healthcare professional. furthermore you've only read a few pages of this thread -- you don't even profess to have read and understood all the arguments against wearing white.
    ********** i read all the posts till 2am last night. my opinion still stands. i also read many elderly nurses who seem to follow the same thought.

    to argue that all nurses should wear white because you looked for wearers of white when you were a patient is an argument that at the very least lacks legitimacy.





    first, you admit you haven't read anywhere near all the arguments against wearing white even in just this one thread, let alone everything else there is to read.
    ********** i read more than you are assuming.

    second, you're just starting school and you don't have a good clear idea yet of just what constitutes the nurse's role. to say that we're subservient is a blatent idicator that you just don't get it. as you progress through your nursing program, you're going to look back at this quote and shudder in horror at your ignorance! we've all been through it, and most of us had our eyes opened at some point about just how not subservient a professional nurse is!
    *********** my two best friends are nurses. i hear it all the time. over time and having hard days they can get idignant attitudes but really all in all, you are helping a person recover. you can be a doctor doing that or god, but it's still a service.

    wearing white is something that patients were conditioned to expect from nurses in the past. but that's in the past. if, when you finish school and start working as a nurse, you choose to wear white because you believe it makes you look more professional (or more virginal or more beautiful or whatever) be my guest. but please remember to wear the appropriate (and appropriately colored) undergarmets with your whites and make sure they're pristine.
    *********** i've heard about the undergarments....but virginal is your issue not mine. i would appreciate it if you held your pettiness in check. i can only imagine what your coworkers have to bear in dealing with your assumptions. when you assume so much you create alot of drama. white has nothing to do with a virginal status as i could care less. you are an incredibly rude woman and i would hate to work with you.



    if you base your respect on the color of a nurse's scrubs rather than on whether she knows her stuff, you're missing the boat again. but i'm hoping that as you progress through your program, you'll "get it."

    good luck. and please let us know how you're doing.
    oh i get it ruby, more than you you know. for some reason those who are conservative and like tradition threatens you. my opinion counts as a patient as well as a to-be nurse. my good friends who are rn's don't like white but they don' take it personal or go off like a loaded gun in defense of wearing psychadelics.

    one thing i am getting from this forum in general, is that nurses back stab eachother, assume petty things without really hearing what a peson is saying and then react in a rather immature way. i sure hope you don't do that with your patients. what color you wear or what color another wears or why it should threaten you, rv. but it sounds like it does. my opinions are my own, but i'm not making you wear white, so give it a rest.
  2. by   CrunchRN
    Realistically, I just don't see the younger generation of nurses coming up being willing to do the "white" thing. I am glad. Pick any dark color if it must be conformist, but white sucks.

    I think the younger generation of nurses will be so in demand to care for all the baby boomers they will be able to demand more than any previous generation.

    I hoope so!
  3. by   emmycRN
    Quote from Demonsthenes
    In ancient Rome, only those of the upper classes were allowed to wear an all white toga. Therefore, I would suggest that all nurses wear a white lab jacket over civilian clothes. I do not like wearing an all white uniform. However, a white lab jacket has, as per the above, positive implications as to the status of the wearer (nurse or doctor). While an all white uniform has a negative implication for the wearer implying a servile status (like a maid).
    I couldn't/wouldn't wear my street clothes to work. Scrubs are much easier to launder and cheaper.
    White is "nice" but why force every nurse to look like every other nurse. IMO this takes away our individuality. And as I've said before, knowledge and practice based on science is what makes nursing professional.
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from sweetface
    oh i get it ruby, more than you you know. for some reason those who are conservative and like tradition threatens you. my opinion counts as a patient as well as a to-be nurse. my good friends who are rn's don't like white but they don' take it personal or go off like a loaded gun in defense of wearing psychadelics.

    one thing i am getting from this forum in general, is that nurses back stab eachother, assume petty things without really hearing what a peson is saying and then react in a rather immature way. i sure hope you don't do that with your patients. what color you wear or what color another wears or why it should threaten you, rv. but it sounds like it does. my opinions are my own, but i'm not making you wear white, so give it a rest.
    [font="comic sans ms"]i'm so sorry you're having such a bad day. no one went off "like a loaded gun" except, perhaps you. i'm sorry you've developed such a negative opinion of our forum -- but perhaps the backstabbing, pettiness and immaturity are in the eye of the beholder.

    done now.
  5. by   RNDreamer
    backstabbing, pettiness and immaturity happens in EVERYWHERE, not just in the nursing field. As far as the uniforms, I am an HHA and have to wear all white...I am not too fond of having to do this and cannot wait until I am able to put a little color into my wardrobe.
  6. by   AliRae
    Well, all I have to say is yay for peds nursing! It takes all the guesswork out of this debate for me.

    Last week clinched my love for bright colours and prints. I was taking care of an irritable 13-month old little boy, and had him on my lap to try and soothe him whilst doing my assessment. He all of a sudden got really quiet, and I felt little fingers poking me. I looked down as he was systematically going over my whole shirt, poking each one of the neon lizards' heads. He even ended up standing up to get my back, and we were firm friends for the rest of the day. I somehow doubt that would have worked if I were in all white.
  7. by   LeahJet
    RubyVee, as usual, you are right on. I appreciate your insightfulness and experience and enjoy your posts.

    I, too, think that non-nurses, whether students or otherwise, will change their frame of mind once they get out in the real world of nursing.
    I remember once upon a time when I was a student and judged the experienced nurses. Of course, I kept my comments to myself but I can see now how off the mark I was.

    I think every nurse out there had those thoughts when they were students. And almost every nurse changes their way of thinking when they gain experience. To think all experienced nurses are wrong and the judgemental nursing student is right is extremely narrow minded.

    Just ask any 5 year and over veteran nurse if they are "subservient".... and then duck.:spin:
  8. by   sweetface
    I'm going off what my other RN friends say as well. They feel there is power in white as well.

    What I think is odd is that the elderly nurses on this thread think there is power in white and some others, but if a student nurse agress she is all of a sudden out of touch, inexperienced or judgemental. I think the reverse is quite possible, that RN's who have loads of experience can be arrogant towards someone with a different opinion. We all have opinions, whether we have an RN or not. No one said 'only those with RN degrees can reply'. I do think there is power in white.

    Also, subservient is different that providing a service. Subservient is an attitude and providing a service is something else with an entirely different attitude. I've never met a nurse who goes to work thinking their patients serve them. It's the other way around. Medical profession is a public 'service' so I'm not sure where the denial is coming from or that bad attitudes from RN's.
  9. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from sweetface
    I'm going off what my other RN friends say as well. They feel there is power in white as well.

    What I think is odd is that the elderly nurses on this thread think there is power in white and some others, but if a student nurse agress she is all of a sudden out of touch, inexperienced or judgemental. I think the reverse is quite possible, that RN's who have loads of experience can be arrogant towards someone with a different opinion. We all have opinions, whether we have an RN or not. No one said 'only those with RN degrees can reply'. I do think there is power in white.

    Also, subservient is different that providing a service. Subservient is an attitude and providing a service is something else with an entirely different attitude. I've never met a nurse who goes to work thinking their patients serve them. It's the other way around. Medical profession is a public 'service' so I'm not sure where the denial is coming from or that bad attitudes from RN's.
    Subservient from dictionary.com:

    http://dictionary.reference.com/sear...&q=subservient

    sub-ser-vi-ent /səbˈsɜrviənt/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[suhb-sur-vee-uhnt] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
    –adjective

    1.serving or acting in a subordinate capacity; subordinate.

    2.servile; excessively submissive; obsequious: subservient persons; subservient conduct.

    3.useful in promoting a purpose or end.


    I can tell you when I graduate and become an RN - I will not be subservient. I will be respectful. I will be kind. There is a substantial difference. I will be an educated professional who cares for my patients according to my scope of practice. That does not = being subordinate or excessively submissive. Your job is NOT to do exactly what the patient wants but to do what the patient needs in accordance with your scope.

    You mentioned nuns at your hospital being nurses. I wonder if you could be bringing some aspect of your own religiosity (or theirs) into this? The entire subservient notion smacks of patriarchy to me. FYI, I'm a student.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Apr 5, '07
  10. by   withasmilelpn
    I love having a choice what to wear. I also love wearing ones that are just fun, like the Dora the Explorer scrub my kids gave me for Christmas. I haven't met anyone who doesn't like it. I know it makes it difficult to tell that I'm a nurse, so I always introduce myself and let them know I'm their nurse that shift. No matter what I am always professional in my demeanor as well. I can tell you this, some people could wear white and have a pair of angel's wings on and still not ever be mistaken for a professional given their behavior!
  11. by   Multicollinearity
    duplication
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Apr 5, '07
  12. by   LeahJet
    Thank you, Multi, for the definition of subservient.
    I am thinking the poster may be mistaken of the proper definition.
    I am respectful, professional, knowledgeable, and kind.
    But subservient? ummm.... no.

    Sweetface, no one is objecting to you voicing your opinion of the color white.

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