Is there power in the color white? - page 11

Hi all. I'm looking for some opinions on whether you believe that returning to wearing all white uniforms might give us back some power. Now let me explain power. I've been an RN for 21 years and... Read More

  1. by   nicuRN2007
    I just wish there was something that would make the nurses stand out from everyone else wearing scrubs. Much of the general public believes that everyone wearing scrubs is a nurse. (I'm still trying to teach my husband this isn't true.) I believe this is a big part of what is making nurses seem less professional...the unprofessional people being perceived as nurses. (Not saying that everyone who wears scrubs and is not a nurse is unprofessional...far from the truth; but a large percentage are.) Although wearing white doesn't seem very practical, if that is what takes to separate the nurses from the others, I am definitely for it.
    Last edit by nicuRN2007 on Oct 20, '06
  2. by   rudopal
    I feel that a nurse who is comfortable makes a better nurse.
    The white (or blue or whatever) uniform debate is a misguided attempt to address problems that are deeper. Wearing white does not a professional make-besides, the image those white uniforms of yore conjure up for me are those of the stereotypical "porno" nurse. How professional is that? I like to wear bright, colorful tops and I get compliments on them from patients ALL THE TIME. They often state that the colors cheer them up and make their stay feel less like they're in a hospital environment. Just may two cents worth...
  3. by   rudopal
    I meant, just my two cents worth...ooops, my bad!
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from ilovescrubs
    i just wish there was something that would make the nurses stand out from everyone else wearing scrubs. much of the general public believes that everyone wearing scrubs is a nurse. (i'm still trying to teach my husband this isn't true.) i believe this is a big part of what is making nurses seem less professional...the unprofessional people being perceived as nurses. (not saying that everyone who wears scrubs and is not a nurse is unprofessional...far from the truth; but a large percentage are.) although wearing white doesn't seem very practical, if that is what takes to separate the nurses from the others, i am definitely for it.
    [font="comic sans ms"]again i say: scrubs are what nurses wear. everyone else should not be wearing them.
  5. by   nicuRN2007
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]again i say: scrubs are what nurses wear. everyone else should not be wearing them.
    this is true, but i don't know how to stop them.
  6. by   jjjoy
    Scrubs originated as in-house operating room clothing, did they not? Grab a set from a bin before shift and toss it in a laundry bag after shift. Baggy to fit a variety of shape and sizes. Reversible so no need to care if right side out or in. People found them comfy and took them from the OR (or wherever else the hospital provided them). Some nurses took to wearing them on the floor. Nursing uniform designers noticed this and started designing outfits using the scrub cut. And printing them in a variety of colors and designs.
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from ILoveScrubs
    This is true, but I don't know how to stop them.
    We have a facility policy now that only those involved in direct pt. care may wear scrubs (except PT people, they were a polo shirt and khakis with the hospital's name on it).

    This has eliminated a lot of the confusing-the-cook-for-the-nurse (which is what got that policy suggestion started.
  8. by   nicuRN2007
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    We have a facility policy now that only those involved in direct pt. care may wear scrubs (except PT people, they were a polo shirt and khakis with the hospital's name on it).

    This has eliminated a lot of the confusing-the-cook-for-the-nurse (which is what got that policy suggestion started.
    That's a great policy. At my hospital, just about everone (including the computer technicians) wears scrubs.
  9. by   MultipurposeRN
    again i say: scrubs are what nurses wear. everyone else should not be wearing them.
    what about nurses' aides and surgical techs?
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from multipurposern
    again i say: scrubs are what nurses wear. everyone else should not be wearing them.
    what about nurses' aides and surgical techs?
    [font="comic sans ms"]i don't think surgical techs are the problem -- how often are they out wandering the floors for patients to confuse them with someone else? pcas are another story. they do direct patient care, they should be wearing scrubs. and if there's a real issue telling them from the nurses and someone needs to be forced to wear a certain color or style of scrubs, that would be the place to start. not with the professionals who have years of education to earn their licenses.
  11. by   LDK6294
    Here's a thought:
    As a patient, I often mistook the PCA/NA as a 'nurse', often embarrassing them (and myself) by asking personal care questions they were not able to discuss with me; I did have a nurse who wore 'modern' whites (pantsuit type, with her nursing pin) and oddly felt reassured when she was around. Working in a LTC setting, everyone wears the same scrub-type apparel. The bigger picture though, is this. Instead of needing recognition/validation from others, or feeling resentful for not being recognized after years of education/service, maybe the question is "How do we feel about ourselves as nurses"??
    All the frustration that comes from a lack of respect from patients, doctors and peers is something that comes from within each and every individual. We (should) know that we choose to be frustrated, or we can ignore the ignorant. If you truly believe that what you are doing is where you should be, then the only validation/respect you need is looking at your life and how you affect others. Every job on this planet has its share of toxic co-workers, administrators, and clients. Whether or not one is willing to put up with it because one cares about how they do their job is the relevant question; not whether the uniform makes the person more valuable.
    I think the forest is being missed for the trees.
    respectfully,
    LDK6294
  12. by   oldshoes
    It's really sounding , to me anyway, that patients that are a little older, or maybe LTC/SNF residents really do dig the white. Maybe nurses in that line of work might be more inclined to wear it. Different types of work wear for different types of nursing.
    Food point. And not just different types of work, but different communities, too. Different groups of people will have different impressions of your uniforms.
  13. by   playnurse
    hi this is my first post but thought I could put my 2 cents in anyway. I work with geriatric psych patients and while white would be nice, it is way to easy to get dirty from cleaning up messes from the top to the bottom. I wear a scrub jacket but it doesn't always cover what it needs to to keep me from getting messed up at times. When the uniform gets unwearable at work what do we get but scrubs to change into?

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