Is there nursing after 50? - page 3

Does being 50+ mean I have to quit nursing and go into poverty for the rest of my life or am I supossed to kill myself?... Read More

  1. by   Thunderwolf
    Yes...there is plenty of life in nursing after fifty.
  2. by   RS0302
    I think you still have plenty of time. My grandmother is an LPN and working in LTC, and she is 65 years old.
  3. by   zenman
    I'll be 54 in a few days and when I get off work in the morning I'll be in Xing-I class from 8-12 noon. I'm tougher than dead dirt. Just let some young whipper snapper tell me I'm too old for anything and I'll rip their head off and crap in their neck! Can I say that here??
  4. by   jeepgirl
    my mom is 63, an RN, and loving it! she's a psych nurse and has been for 20 years. she's found her nitch and i don't think she'll ever leave.
  5. by   stevierae
    Malt, none of us knows your full story--but I can't see why you can't apply for some travel nursing jobs--there are TONS of travel companies out there!!!!! You can even take a travel assignment in the town you are currently in!! There are even travel companies that provide rental cars!!!

    YOu don't HAVE to take their supplied housing unless you want to--you can opt to take a housing subsidy--and, if you take an out of town assignment, that money (the subsidy) is tax-free!!
  6. by   Malt123
    my story is that I am stuck in this town, there is nothing here. all the agencies that I have called want 1-2 years recent hospital experience. This is totally absurd that I am not working. there's a hospital right by me they won't hire me, there's a nursing home that told me "they will triple their salary if you come here" have no idea who they are or what this has to do with ne I am just an RN looking for employment
  7. by   UM Review RN
    Does being 50+ mean I have to quit nursing and go into poverty for the rest of my life or am I supossed to kill myself?
    No, you don't have to quit nursing to stay poor.

    But seriously folks, I'm over 50 but nobody really notices because I live in Florida where 50 is young.

    You can tell which unit I work by my name. Even on night shift, it's pretty busy but I love it. I'll probably stay til my mortgage is paid off--when I'm about 100.
  8. by   CseMgr1
    Age discrimination happens every day. My sister, who is not a nurse, and after working for the same company for 19 years, was called onto the carpet one day and fired for "poor performance", which was total B.S. Only the year before, they had demoted her from a Manager and cut her salary by $10,000 a year...a sure sign of the 'Rank and Yank" method many corporations are using these days, to downsize their payrolls. She was 52 at the time she was let go: another sign she was being discriminated against. Well, she got herself a lawyer (the same thing that you should be doing right now), and when he supoenaed her personnel file, there was nothing in it. But what saved her was all the letters of commendation from internal and external customers she had saved during all her years working for that place. She settled out of court, but hasn't been able to find a job in the six years since. One company even had the gall to tell her that they were afraid to hire her, fearing that she would get sick. :angryfire
  9. by   stevierae
    Quote from Malt123
    my story is that I am stuck in this town, there is nothing here. all the agencies that I have called want 1-2 years recent hospital experience. This is totally absurd that I am not working. there's a hospital right by me they won't hire me, there's a nursing home that told me "they will triple their salary if you come here" have no idea who they are or what this has to do with ne I am just an RN looking for employment
    You mean, they will offer you TRIPLE what they normally pay if they can get you to join the staff? Is that what you are saying? Heck, I don't want to work long term care but that sure would be tempting!!

    Can you get unemployment, at least for a while? Seriously, I would check out the travel companies, and sign with one of the ones that will give you a rental car. After 13 weeks, when you've built up some savings, you can always renegotiate the contract, and extend or possibly join the staff, if you want to. Travel assignments are always a good way to get your foot in the door.

    I am 50--I ONLY do travel assignments, and have since '95. I did 15 years of being on staff--decided I wanted flexibility more than the benefits.
    Last edit by stevierae on Jan 9, '05
  10. by   Malt123
    I got burnt by one of these companies, at the time a 13 week assignment sounds easy until they let you go and screw you out of everything. very leary of trying that again. it seems only one or two make it and the others are used as a way for some one else to get their feet in the door. like the agencies that advertise they have nurses making up to $100,000, yeah they have maybe one getting all the money. I just want to be an RN and get paid for my services.
  11. by   Malt123
    the administor at this nursing home said "if you (meaning me) come here "they" will triple "their" salaries" not mine don't know who "they" are
  12. by   teeituptom
    I will never retire. I have figured it out that some day at work one of my coworkers will round a corner in the ER and just find me stretched out already dead.
  13. by   alintanurse
    Malt123--there is life after fifty,just read the thread "Mature nurses over fifty". Have you looked into telephonic case management?

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