Is there ANY reason for Experienced nurses to be Rude to New Nurses?? - page 4

I am a new nurse, graduated in September, passed board November 30th and started Orienting December 31st. I just finished my 7th week and until now have been very lucky as far as having most of the... Read More

  1. by   GardenDove
    Kellie, It sounds to me as if your friend of 30 years experience works in a place with a very negative workplace culture, where the shiftwars are a fact of life.

    Where I work in acute care, lab wakes the pts at around 5:30, and if I were to give a needed suppository it would be between 5:30 and 6:30. I would communicate this to the oncoming shift who would most likely view it as a positive thing. I would not give a suppository before bedtime out of consideration of the pt, not to get out of dealing with the possible results.

    When I worked LTC it was the specific responsiblity of the night nurses to do the BM checks and give suppositories at around 6:00. No one considered this trying to dump work on the next shift, but as a policy that made sense.
  2. by   cardiacRN2006
    IMO, there is never a reason for nurses to be so rude to other nurses. I agree that they are few and far between, but it only takes one nurse to ruin your job at a facility.

    It's ridiculous to think that grown people are still being allowed to be bullies at work.

    I am being bullied at work. If this person acted this way at my husband's work, then they would already have been spoken to, and dealt with. If it continues, then they would be fired.

    Not true in nursing. When was the last time an RN was fired for being a bully? Especially in this time of the 'nursing shortage'?

    That's where the culture comes from. People will say over and over again, that this isn't the norm for nursing, that these people would be rude no matter what.


    The difference between nursing and other fields is that in nursing, this behavior is tolerated.



    And that makes all the difference in the world.
  3. by   pink2blue1
    Quote from GardenDove
    The best time to give a suppository is early in the morning so the pt can poop during the day. People don't poop at night usually. When I worked LTC, the traditional time was to give suppositories at 6:30 AM. Similar to Lasix, you don't want pts peeing and pooping at night, it disturbs their sleep.
    Another point, This may be exactly why it was put in by pharmacy at 5AM! So infact it wasn't mine to be missed anyways. I was thinking this too. Better in the AM so they can poop and be done with it. I know for a fact it was NOT in emar before I left. I was finishing closing my charts at 7:15 and re-checked ALL my patients emars to make sure.
  4. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Quote from pink2blue1
    Another point, This may be exactly why it was put in by pharmacy at 5AM! So infact it wasn't mine to be missed anyways. I was thinking this too. Better in the AM so they can poop and be done with it. I know for a fact it was NOT in emar before I left. I was finishing closing my charts at 7:15 and re-checked ALL my patients emars to make sure.
    WHAT A GREAT OPPORTUNITY YOU HAVE TO BE GRACIOUS!!! I love it when this happens.

    You can be the Big Girl of the two of you, explain that you did in fact check the emar, that you knew it wasn't there before you left, etc., etc., and to thank her (with a straight face) for drawing your attention to the situation anyway, because as a new nurse, blah, blah, blah....

    This is a good position to be in when you are crosswise with someone, but it is oh, so sweet when you are the one who was in the right.
  5. by   pink2blue1
    THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS RESPONDED!!! You have ALL made me feel better. I felt a sense of devastation that morning and it threw my WHOLE day off. To top it off a nurse I ended up giving report to that night was RUDE and at first I thought it was ME but he was in-fact being rude to everyone he got report from. I don't understand why burnt out people come to work night after night or day after day. But then again I haven't been a nurse long enough to speak to that I guess.

    Thanks so much! Now I feel like my next shift I will be much more confident in knowing, I got through ONE HECK of a HARD day and if all I did was miss a suppository (Which from general concensus seems to be that AM is a BETTER time to give it) then I am ok with that. It's the FIRST time I would have ever missed a med.

    But anyways, THANK YOU ALL!!! You rock! :icon_hug: :icon_hug:
  6. by   GardenDove
    You're very welcome, pink to blue. And, you opened up an interesting debate about the best time to give a suppository, I might start a thread about it.
  7. by   KellieNurse06
    Quote from GardenDove
    Kellie, It sounds to me as if your friend of 30 years experience works in a place with a very negative workplace culture, where the shiftwars are a fact of life.

    Where I work in acute care, lab wakes the pts at around 5:30, and if I were to give a needed suppository it would be between 5:30 and 6:30. I would communicate this to the oncoming shift who would most likely view it as a positive thing. I would not give a suppository before bedtime out of consideration of the pt, not to get out of dealing with the possible results.

    When I worked LTC it was the specific responsiblity of the night nurses to do the BM checks and give suppositories at around 6:00. No one considered this trying to dump work on the next shift, but as a policy that made sense.
    Oh no Garden...lol...I wasn't trying to step on your toes...please please don't think that.....and yes..you are right on the money about the negative workplace...she works in a home that has dd adults....you know those house settings with only a few residents with 24 hour care...and yes there are people she works with,...who like others have mentioned...are just burnt out miserable people who don't even care one bit about the people they are caring for...they just want a paycheck...and they come in with the gloom & doom miserable attitude & facial expressions to go right along with it and hate seeing anyone happy.....like her,& it sends them over the edge. She really loves & cares about the people she takes care of...that's why she's been there for so long......... When I was talking about people who give supps at change of shift...I was talking about the ones who purposely give it at that time so they don't have to clean up the mess & leave it to the next shift; it is out there trust me.........I think it's great that your workplace works well....... even in the hospitals I have been at when I was doing my clinicals...the nurses picked the times for meds......and suppositories as well, and they were not given until later in the morning......... and I had a discussion over this very thing with a former instructor who also thought that was a rotten thing to do to the oncoming shift.......it would be interesting to do a poll on this or start a thread as you suggested.....good idea!
  8. by   nurse_clown
    I agree with that. Rude people are often rude at work. Nothing we can do about them but, to ignore them and get our jobs done.
  9. by   jjjoy
    I think part of the problem with rudeness in nursing is that nurses are so dependent upon each other in providing proper care to their patients. In other environments, if someone gives you incorrect or incomplete information or turns something in late, it's a hassle and may cause many problems, but it's usually something fixable and fairly forgettable. But in patient care, the problems caused may threaten the patients' well-being, even if just indirectly by taking more of the nurses' time. And the nurses are often held responsible in the present for any of the problems "caused" by another, and this is a daily threat to one's ability to perform their job & complete all of the work before them.

    New nurses are especially dependent upon their colleagues to provide safe patient care. They simply do not have enough of their own experience to pull upon to be able to judge how seriously to take the various feedback that they get from colleagues. It's only natural to take all criticism to heart because they don't want to be dismissive of any feedback that they get. It could be important and the difference between life and death for their patients. They just can't tell yet when it's okay to let certain feedback bounce off them.

    Shiftwork is another factor and the fact that nurses are handing off to different people each time. They can't build up specific strategies to deal with colleague's predictable weaknesses or rough spots because they don't know who they will be following each day. Because they may not have to work directly with the most difficult people every day, the difficult people may end up having more leeway than they might in another environment, when consistent interaction might lead to more people refusing to work with the difficult person, ending in either the loss of good employers or the the difficult person being managed differently.
  10. by   MELYRN
    This was not very professional of her. Why do these nurses get away with this kind of behavior?
  11. by   madwife2002
    Old thread closed

close