Is the nursing job market starting to go down the drain?

  1. I've noticed that around here that while there are still lots of job adverstisements for nurses, that there are not as many as there were last year at this time. It also seems like that recruitment bonuses are not being advertised as much. So are all the statistics about a continuing shortgage bogus? Maybe many nurses are coming out of retirment or coming back from other second careers because of all the news about shortages. Hopefully, I am wrong because I hate to think I will graduate in a year into a profession where employment prospects will become bleak.
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   zenman
    I don't think you will have to worry!
  4. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Love767
    I've noticed that around here that while there are still lots of job adverstisements for nurses, that there are not as many as there were last year at this time. It also seems like that recruitment bonuses are not being advertised as much. So are all the statistics about a continuing shortgage bogus? Maybe many nurses are coming out of retirment or coming back from other second careers because of all the news about shortages. Hopefully, I am wrong because I hate to think I will graduate in a year into a profession where employment prospects will become bleak.
    And have you looked at how bleak the prospects are in other job markets.

    Many of those nurses coming out of retirement had no choice. Spouse got dumped by longterm employer, retirement money did not work out, etc.

    There are plenty of jobs out there. And they are certainly more secure than many other career fields.

    And to sign up for a sign on bonus...is not a terribly smart move.
  5. by   Tweety
    The economy has been bad, more nurses are going into nursing school, and a few nurses are getting back into nursing, and more foreign nurses are coming over. There's been a slight ease in the shortage on my unit, especially on the day shift where we now only have two travel nurses instead of six. Problem is the experience level is very low, but that will change.

    I've also noticed that quite a bit of nurses are willing to work overtime. In fact there's starting to be a bit of bickering "you and so and so are hogging all the overtime shifts".
  6. by   teeituptom
    HHHmmmmm I dont see that as an issue
  7. by   Dinith88
    I have similar experiences as 3rdshift guy.

    Nursing is funnny as it has an inverse relationship with the economy in general.
    Meaning, when things get bad with the national economy (esp. job market), more people turn to nursing as a career because it's one of the few industries projected to grow..and grow.. Nursing's kinda like a crutch for the job-seeking masses. ('cant find a job?..hmm, i think i'll go be a nurse..')

    Back in the rolling 90's (as an example) lots of people were getting into the booming computer industry, the economy was trucking along...people were doing well..and as predicted nursing enrollment slipped. The direct result of which is the shortage we're 'experiencing' today.

    There will always be a need for nurses. But if you're currently looking for fat sign-on bonuses and extra goodies...be prepared to re-locate....(or wait around for a decade or so )
  8. by   Sheri257
    Long term, demand for nurses is expected to increase because of the aging baby boom generation. 200,000 vacant positions are projected in my state alone in the next 20 years, a lot more nationwide. So, hopefully, you won't have to worry about temporary swings in the market. Besides, if there are still lots of ads for jobs, that's nothing to worry about compared with other industries.

    I don't care about sign on bonuses. Just give me a steady pay check.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 11, '04
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Dinith88
    Nursing's kinda like a crutch for the job-seeking masses. ('cant find a job?..hmm, i think i'll go be a nurse.')
    True. Although many of the job seeking masses are also looking for something easier. I can't tell you how many times I've heard, "I didn't realize it would be this hard!"

    Of course, many of them flunk out.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 11, '04
  10. by   VickyRN
    The present nursing shortage is different from all that have preceded it. What we are beginning to experience is a demographic shift: the baby boomers are approaching retirement age; at the same time the mean age of the floor nurse is 46 years old. In just 10-15 years, most of these RN's and LPN's will be retiring, just as the boomers enter old age. There are just not enough new grads or foreign nurses to replace them. And, there are not enough nursing faculty (average age 52) to train the masses of new grads needed. Recipe for a crisis? You bet!
  11. by   dansamy
    I'm going into nursing because I always wanted to go into medicine. Right after high school, I was all prepared to attend a small private college as a pre-med student. Then, life got in the way, and I put off college. Then, I fell in love (stupid) & got married (stupid on top of stupid!). Well then I had to have babies (not stupid - they light up my life!). I'm just now getting back around to my education. It's too late in life & I'm too old to be even remotely considering med school. (I don't think I have the energy to keep up with the 22 year old classmates.) I come from a long line of nurses. My grandfather begged me to go into nursing instead of being stubbornly set on med school. I wish I had listened to him. I could've still gone to nursing school with the life complications that kept me out of college. I could've had several more years in the industry instead of starting out 10 years later. BUT, there's still (& always will be) a good job market for nurses. It may have a little downturn with a large infusion of new grads, but never fear, there will be plenty of students/new grads who discover this is the wrong field for them. They'll go into other industries instead. And you'll see the advertisements touting hefty sign-ons again.
  12. by   teeituptom
    Quote from dansamy
    I'm going into nursing because I always wanted to go into medicine. Right after high school, I was all prepared to attend a small private college as a pre-med student. Then, life got in the way, and I put off college. Then, I fell in love (stupid) & got married (stupid on top of stupid!). Well then I had to have babies (not stupid - they light up my life!). I'm just now getting back around to my education. It's too late in life & I'm too old to be even remotely considering med school. (I don't think I have the energy to keep up with the 22 year old classmates.) I come from a long line of nurses. My grandfather begged me to go into nursing instead of being stubbornly set on med school. I wish I had listened to him. I could've still gone to nursing school with the life complications that kept me out of college. I could've had several more years in the industry instead of starting out 10 years later. BUT, there's still (& always will be) a good job market for nurses. It may have a little downturn with a large infusion of new grads, but never fear, there will be plenty of students/new grads who discover this is the wrong field for them. They'll go into other industries instead. And you'll see the advertisements touting hefty sign-ons again.

    1. How do you figure you are too old for med school

    2. how do you figure your stupid if you fell in love , got married, and had children.. Ive been married 30 yrs have 7 kids. Raised 4 to become 5 while in nursing school and worked 60 hours a week...Simply had to be done. Dont know how but did.

    ps. dont ever tell your wife she was a complication that kept you out of school.

    You are 28 and you dont think you can keep up with a 22 yo. I would like to help you find a way to bolster your confidence in yourself. Im in my 50s and I keep up with 22 yo joggers, I beat 22 yo golfers, and I now sky dive for fun. Dont give up.
  13. by   marilynmom
    [QUOTE=dansamy]I'm going into nursing because I always wanted to go into medicine. Right after high school, I was all prepared to attend a small private college as a pre-med student. Then, life got in the way, and I put off college. Then, I fell in love (stupid) & got married (stupid on top of stupid!). Well then I had to have babies (not stupid - they light up my life!). I'm just now getting back around to my education. It's too late in life & I'm too old to be even remotely considering med school. (I don't think I have the energy to keep up with the 22 year old classmates.) QUOTE]

    hmm there are a *lot* of "older" pre-med and medical students. I am 30 now and will be starting medical school in 2 years, most of my pre-med classmates are in their 30's and 40's and a few 50 year olds. Medical schools like to see life experience There are a lot of medical schools that seek out non-traditional and "older" students just because we have more to offer and more maturity.

    Nursing is not medicine, if you want to study and do *medicine* don't become a nurse. It took me 2 years to figure that out. And if you still think medical school is a no, what about Physician Assistant school?

    And I do all that with what you call "life complications", taking a full load of pre-med classes making straight A's, 2 very young children at home and a husband

    Just my thoughts....

    Marilyn
  14. by   teeituptom
    [QUOTE=marilynmom]
    Quote from dansamy
    I'm going into nursing because I always wanted to go into medicine. Right after high school, I was all prepared to attend a small private college as a pre-med student. Then, life got in the way, and I put off college. Then, I fell in love (stupid) & got married (stupid on top of stupid!). Well then I had to have babies (not stupid - they light up my life!). I'm just now getting back around to my education. It's too late in life & I'm too old to be even remotely considering med school. (I don't think I have the energy to keep up with the 22 year old classmates.) QUOTE]

    hmm there are a *lot* of "older" pre-med and medical students. I am 30 now and will be starting medical school in 2 years, most of my pre-med classmates are in their 30's and 40's and a few 50 year olds. Medical schools like to see life experience There are a lot of medical schools that seek out non-traditional and "older" students just because we have more to offer and more maturity.

    Nursing is not medicine, if you want to study and do *medicine* don't become a nurse. It took me 2 years to figure that out. And if you still think medical school is a no, what about Physician Assistant school?

    And I do all that with what you call "life complications", taking a full load of pre-med classes making straight A's, 2 very young children at home and a husband

    Just my thoughts....

    Marilyn
    Right On Marilyn
    Hang in there and go fo it

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