is nursing theory important to nursing practice - page 4

hello everyone...pls help me with our debate this Monday.. our clinical instructor gave us the topic,,"IS NURSING THEORY IMPORTANT TO NURSING PRACTICE?,, and we are in the negative side,.the decision... Read More

  1. Visit  nicurn001 profile page
    1
    You can teach a student how to provide care for patients , but if a student enters nursing does not know how to be caring towards others , it's a bit late in the day , to try to teach them this personality trait . I don't think being caring is a trait that can be taught in the classroom , it is something that should be a basis of a persons personality , that is transparently genuine , not a theory the student has learned and can check off their skill set .
    MedSurgeMess likes this.
  2. Visit  Woodenpug profile page
    0
    No! It is nothing more than an archaic system of classification. Now, you can find relevant information without knowing the theoretical model.
  3. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
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    Quote from Woodenpug
    No! It is nothing more than an archaic system of classification. Now, you can find relevant information without knowing the theoretical model.
    Isn't that relevant information resting on a foundation of theories, nursing and otherwise?
    Moogie likes this.
  4. Visit  llg profile page
    1
    Quote from nicurn001
    You can teach a student how to provide care for patients , but if a student enters nursing does not know how to be caring towards others , it's a bit late in the day , to try to teach them this personality trait . I don't think being caring is a trait that can be taught in the classroom , it is something that should be a basis of a persons personality , that is transparently genuine , not a theory the student has learned and can check off their skill set .
    You might be interested to know that the ideas you just expressed in the quote above ARE a theory of caring. You are proposing a theory of caring that has been discussed/debated in the literature by caring theorists. The following questions have been discussed for years. How does a person (nurse) acquire the value of caring. Do values have to be taught in early childhood? or can they be acquired as adults? How can teach values to children and/or adults? How can we help people internalize a set of desired values?

    Like it or not ... you have just shown that you have a theory of caring.
    Moogie likes this.
  5. Visit  Moogie profile page
    1
    Quote from Woodenpug
    No! It is nothing more than an archaic system of classification. Now, you can find relevant information without knowing the theoretical model.
    Okay, I'll bite. Am always interested in expanding my knowledge base. Can you please give me examples or show me how to find relevant information that doesn't rely on antiquated theoretical models? Thanks!
    MedSurgeMess likes this.
  6. Visit  precious nikz profile page
    0
    [FONT=Arial Narrow]thanx for the idea..i really appreciate it..

    actually im having research about the topic,,

    i know that there is a brilliant idea that will pop up in our minds in our researches,,

    thank u!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    nikz
  7. Visit  precious nikz profile page
    0
    thank u....little by little im a having an idea how to make our stand,,thank u so much..
  8. Visit  precious nikz profile page
    0
    i,ve really learned a lot while reading ur comments and stands about the issue,,

    thanx guys,,
  9. Visit  precious nikz profile page
    0
    Quote from landdrnbsn
    Understanding that theory is the backbone of all clinical care perfomed by a nurse. We develope curriculum based on the theory of nurses' before us. Maybe you did not get enough theory while you were in school? Two that you discussed, Benner and Roy are two very classic nursing theorists! Research the two and you will be amazed at the connection between what you do as a nurse and what they wrote.
    For the student looking for the negative side of theory in regards to nursing. Not all of our actions as nurses have a theory based approach. For instance, compassion. Compassion is an intregal aspect to nursing. Without the ability to give sympathy and/or compassion in respect to the care we give, we would be unable to approriately care for our clients/patients. Compassion is nothing we can learn, we are born with the ability to be compassionate to each other. No theory behind that one. Another, intiution. Again, another innate ability that does not require a theoritical background. Practicing nurses use intiuation constantly in patient care. We (nurses) need to be able to thing ahead, following our instincts. We we start to see changes in our patients, is it just scientific? Many times intiutions tells us that something is wrong, or will be wrong soon. Do we act on it or wait? A good nurse acts on her intuition. Survey a floor and ask nurses how often they treat based on intuition? Good luck with your debate. I hope I have helped you somewhat.

    thank u so much..im starting to be relieved with what u said,,,thank u.. i think i know how to stand in our debate..
  10. Visit  Woodenpug profile page
    0
    Quote from Moogie
    Okay, I'll bite. Am always interested in expanding my knowledge base. Can you please give me examples or show me how to find relevant information that doesn't rely on antiquated theoretical models? Thanks!
    I somewhat question your sincerity. I apologize in advance, because I'm probably mistaken. Three things raise concerns for me. Antiquated and archaic mean two really different things. Being able to find relevant information and whether or not you can link it to a theoretical model has two different meanings. Finally, do you sincerely believe that you must know the nursing theory before you can do a review of the literature?

    I should also say that given that you are sincere, we probably should move this to another thread.
  11. Visit  jjjoy profile page
    1
    I appreciate your thoughtful response!

    Quote from Moogie
    Yes! While we do know much about how pharmaceuticals work within the body, much of pharmacology is based on theories that must be tested through the scientific process. Scientists have learned tremendous things about the body, especially with the discovery of the human genome, but even that started with ideas, theories. And the grand theory behind civil engineering is the theory of gravity.
    The theories you mention in regard to pharmaceuticals and civil engineering are not exclusive to the professions of pharmacy or civil engineering. The scientific process is available to all fields and I don't see the *need* for specific "nursing theory" in order to develop a body of knowledge specific to the nursing profession.

    We'd use theory as a way to determine our approach. Would we use Pender's theories of health promotion as a guide for our teaching materials? How might we approach this issue if we followed, say, Rogerian theories or the Neumann Systems Model? The Roy Adaptation Model?/
    Couldn't one also "borrow" an effective adult learning theory to apply in regards to post-op teaching? Perhaps a nurse can or has developed a specific theory specific to patient teaching and learning. It still wouldn't be unique to nursing. Dieticians, physical therapists, etc might adopt that theory in their teaching efforts.

    In regards to Watson's theories of transpersonal caring, I remember sitting in a class one time and nurses were debating whether or not caring was necessary to be a nurse.
    Whether or not caring is a requirement of practicing one's profession is a question relevant beyond the nursing profession. Teachers, social workers, and even physicians can debate that.

    I value theory as a foundation for nursing practice. I honestly don't believe thinking and doing have to be mutually exclusive in the nursing profession.
    I agree with you about thinking and doing not being mutually exclusive. And I do see value in using nursing theory as a foundation for practice. However, as another noted, as ways of thinking become ingrained over time, sometimes the pendulum swings the other way.

    I got pounded over the head in nursing school about autonomous nursing actions and nursing rationales (provide comfort, help acheive highest level of self care, etc) based on nursing theory. Meanwhile, we just whizzed by the medical side of things at lightening speed as if THAT was obvious and the cursory overview we got would more than suffice as a foundation that we'd build on once we started practicing. The medical side of nursing care was taught by assigning "pages 150-350 by next class" and requiring a page on pathophys & medical interventions in 8-page care plans or 30-page case studies. The rest of the content focused on autonomous nursing actions (read: anything that doesn't involve a physician getting involved) and/or describing how the listed nursing interventions fit within this or that nursing model of care.

    In other words, I felt we got more than enough "critical thinking" & nursing theory and not nearly enough "practical knowledge." We hear many new grads complain that colleagues expect a lot more from them practically than they are able to perform. It seems to have come about that some nursing programs seem to primarily teach nursing as it relates to nursing theory (as opposed to providing a lot of practical training) on the basis that the new grads will learn the practical skills on the job anyway whereas they may never be exposed to nursing theory again.

    I think that's a backlash to a history of nursing education focusing solely on practical knowledge. And I hope more of a balance can be found. But that's getting into a whole 'nother can of worms, isn't it?

    Interesting discussion!
    Last edit by jjjoy on Jul 9, '09
    Moogie likes this.
  12. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
    0
    I would imagine we aren't the only profession that has theories we grouse about. It's easy to imagine a forum where clinical psychologists occasionally gripe about Freud and "penis envy." I think of this when I read anything related to Rogers and "energy fields."
  13. Visit  nicurn001 profile page
    1
    Quote from llg
    You might be interested to know that the ideas you just expressed in the quote above ARE a theory of caring. You are proposing a theory of caring that has been discussed/debated in the literature by caring theorists. The following questions have been discussed for years. How does a person (nurse) acquire the value of caring. Do values have to be taught in early childhood? or can they be acquired as adults? How can teach values to children and/or adults? How can we help people internalize a set of desired values?

    Like it or not ... you have just shown that you have a theory of caring.
    In my reality as a bedside nurse , I have simply stated the bleeding obvious , re caring ie . you either are or are not a caring person . In the Academic realm you can discuss to your hearts content the theory of caring , but it's practical relevance to bedside nursing as on a par with how many angels can be placed on a pin head .

    When I entered nursing in the UK the Nursing Process was the buzz phrase , as time goes by different Buzz words have come and gone , they have kept Academia and Administrators busy come up with new commitees , schemes and ever more paperwork for the bedside nurse , but has it produced an advance in the care provided to patients ?. I know my answer to that question .

    I am trying not to dismiss Nursing Theory , it has its place as a component of Nurse Training , but little importance in the day to day struggle of bedside nurses . If academia / administrative nurses would study practical issues such as what safe staffing levels are and how to come up with an acuity tool that reflects patient care , which is not influenced by reimbursement , then maybe I would not have such a jaundiced opinion of of them .
    Dinith88 likes this.

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