Is marijuana addictive? - page 2

A couple of us were having this discussion tonight. One nurses says no it is not addictive. I said "well I've know some potheads who couldn't stop smoking, couldn't face life without pot, etc." ... Read More

  1. by   portland_guy
    the post that said that it is a gateway drug is not true. I saw in the new york times earlier this month that a study shows that there is no correlation between people who use marijuana on a regual basis and hard drug users.
  2. by   RoadRunner
    It's not physically addictive, and it does wonders for some sick people (chimotherapy patients for instance). But it does more damage to lungs than cigarette does. I can't remember how much more tough. There is a lot of studies on it throughout the country, because of the new "legalization vibe".
    Well, since alchool is legal, why not something a lot less harmfull should not?
  3. by   Q.
    Originally posted by portland_guy
    the post that said that it is a gateway drug is not true. I saw in the new york times earlier this month that a study shows that there is no correlation between people who use marijuana on a regual basis and hard drug users.
    I'd be curious to read this study. If I am reading your post right, the study affirms that chronic users of marijuana are not using hard drugs. Could it be that they simply haven't moved on to hard drugs? I've always read that marijuana is just that: a gateway. You use marijuana and are then more inclined to move away from marijuana to heroin, etc.

    I don't think that if you're using heroin that you'd still be using marijuana; afterall, what effect would it still have on you?

    I think the study is misleading based on your post.
  4. by   Q.
    Originally posted by RoadRunner
    Well, since alchool is legal, why not something a lot less harmfull should not?
    I'm not sure I agree with it's legalization by simply stating that alcohol is legal. Whether marijuana is physically addictive or not doesn't matter in my mind. What matters is it's mood altering. For the same reason that my methadone patient couldn't drive home after his injection is why marijuana should be the same. And the only reason he didn't drive home was because I didn't let him. If marijuana were legal, whose to stop the person from taking a drag and then driving, all the while thinking the telephone pole on the road just turned into a python?? I don't want yet another thing besides drunk driving to worry about.
  5. by   hoolahan
    I think it can contribute to fungal infections in the lungs too, nasty!
  6. by   portland_guy
    Originally posted by Susy K
    If marijuana were legal, whose to stop the person from taking a drag and then driving, all the while thinking the telephone pole on the road just turned into a python??
    Have you ever tried marijuana? Obviously not. I don't think you understand its effects.

    You have been fed all this gobbledy-gook from the media and Nancy Reagan about its effects and how evil it is. There are plenty of users out there who are fine, upstanding professional people. There is no difference between having a couple drinks and marijuana use. As long as people are safe, I couldn't care one way or another.

    I say make it legal, just tax the hell out of it. We spend millions (billions?) on trying to remove marijuana from society. How long has the drug war been going on? Well, let me tell you it isn't working. It is just as easy to obtain as it was 20 years ago.
  7. by   Q.
    Originally posted by portland_guy
    Have you ever tried marijuana? Obviously not. I don't think you understand its effects.


    Yes I have. Your assumption was wrong. And I am aware of the paranoia, the slowed reaction time, and the fact that I fell unconscious after using it.
    Tell me, I should have been driving?

    I say make it legal, just tax the hell out of it. We spend millions (billions?) on trying to remove marijuana from society. How long has the drug war been going on? Well, let me tell you it isn't working. It is just as easy to obtain as it was 20 years ago.
    Again, I don't buy the "well it's out there so let's legalize it" philosophy or the "well alcohol is legal" so let's legalize it. We can hardly control our problems with alcohol in this country and drunk driving - I don't see adding marijuana to the list as helpful by any means.

    And whether you think marijuana use is no different than a couple drinks; well, I don't drink to get drunk. I drink because it tastes good with my food.
    Last edit by Susy K on Dec 11, '02
  8. by   fergus51
    We just had a government study come out on the effects of marijuana. The commission reccomended the legalization of the drug as well as erasing the criminal records of anyone convicted of possessing it for personal use. It will never happen because we are the US' b*tch and they don't want it to happen.

    They did not find that it was a gateway drug. From what I understand this was not done by asking pot users if they use anything more heavy as Susy suggested. They did it by studying actual hard drug users and seeing if they previously used marijuana at a higher rate than people who aren't hard drug users and if that led them to harder drugs. They didn't find that it did.

    Personally I think it is ridiculous we waste so much of our time and resources on pot. All of the arguments against legalizing marijuana could also be used to argue in favor of criminalizing alcohol. I know alcohol has caused a lot more problems in my family than pot. I also don't buy the notion that if it was legalized we would all become addicts because that hasn't happened in Holland.
  9. by   portland_guy
    Originally posted by Susy K

    Tell me, I should have been driving?
    No, I am not saying you should have been driving.

    Originally posted by Susy K

    Again, I don't buy the "well it's out there so let's legalize it" philosophy or the "well alcohol is legal" so let's legalize it. We can hardly control our problems with alcohol in this country and drunk driving - I don't see adding marijuana to the list as helpful by any means.
    It is already added to the list. Do you think that since it is illegal it isn't used? That people don't already use it then get in a car? Oh, believe me, it is everywhere and easily available.

    Legalizing it would give the government more control about who sells it, how it is obtained, who grows it. It would take the drug dealers out the cycle.
  10. by   Q.
    Originally posted by fergus51
    They did it by studying actual hard drug users and seeing if they previously used marijuana at a higher rate than people who aren't hard drug users and if that led them to harder drugs. They didn't find that it did.

    I'm not sure I understand this statement. So, the study examined hard drug users to determine if they used marijuana at a higher rate than non hard drug users? What's a "higher rate?" Meaning frequency of use, as in one a week/once a day thing?

    I'm most curious to see if hard drug users started their drug habits with marijuana or not, regardless of frequency of use.
  11. by   Q.
    Originally posted by portland_guy
    It is already added to the list. Do you think that since it is illegal it isn't used? That people don't already use it then get in a car? Oh, believe me, it is everywhere and easily available.

    By "list" I meant list of that which is legal.

    And yes, seeing as I used it myself I am well aware it is available. I think by keeping it illegal would act as a deterrant for stupid, recreational use in which people DO get in cars.

    Legalizing it would give the government more control about who sells it, how it is obtained, who grows it. It would take the drug dealers out the cycle.
    If legalizing it means that it falls as a controlled substance, such as methadone, morphine, etc, then fine I'm all for that. But legalizing it to the point where you can go to 7-11 and buy it is not something I agree with.
    Besides, next we'll have marijuana settlements to each state, claiming that we didn't "realize" the damage it causes! Whatever!
  12. by   portland_guy
    An independent study contradicts a key premise of U.S. anti-drug policy -- that marijuana is a "gateway" to more harmful drugs like heroin or cocaine -- the Chicago Tribune reported Dec. 5.

    Research conducted by the private, non-profit RAND Drug Policy Research Center concluded that marijuana use probably doesn't lead teens to experiment with harder drugs. Rather, the study found that teens who use hard drugs are predisposed to do so.

    "The evidence has seemed so strong in favor of the gateway effect that a lot of policymakers and others have taken it for granted the gateway effect is real," said Andrew Morral, lead author of the RAND study. "We have shown why this is not necessarily the case."

    The research was based on data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse taken between 1982 and 1994.

    According to the study, 50 percent of U.S. teens have access to marijuana by the age of 16, while exposure to cocaine, heroin, or hallucinogens doesn't occur until age 20.

    "Kids get their first opportunity to use marijuana years before they get their first exposure to hard drugs," Morral said. "It is possible marijuana is not a gateway drug. It's just the first thing kids often come across."

    The researchers do not advocate legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana, though they do question the U.S. government's intensive focus on the drug. "If our model is correct, to a certain extent we are diverting resources away from hard-drug problems," Morral said. "Spending money on marijuana control may not be having downstream consequences on the use of hard drugs."

    The study is published in the British Journal Addiction.
  13. by   Q.
    From doing a small search of our current perodical holdings in our office, I found this:


    Cannabis-induced psychosis: a cross-sectional comparison with acute schizophrenia.

    Source
    Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 105(3):173-8, 2002

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: The existence of cannabis-induced psychosis (CP) remains controversial, partly because of methodological problems. We hypothesize that acute schizophrenia (AS) and CP can have distinct demographic, premorbid and clinical features. METHOD: We compared 26 patients with CP to 35 with AS, after their cannabis-consumption status was confirmed by repeated urine screens. Patients with CP were assessed after at least 1 week but not more than 1 month of abstinence. Symptoms were evaluated with the Present State Examination (PSE). RESULTS: In group CP, male gender, expansive mood and ideation, derealization/depersonalization, visual hallucinations, and disturbances of sensorium were more frequent than in group AS. Premorbid schizoid personality traits were more frequently associated to AS and antisocial personality traits to CP. CONCLUSION: The continuous heavy use of cannabis can induce a psychotic disorder distinct from AS. These two clinical entities share some features but they differ in others.

    Authors
    Rubino T. Vigano D. Massi P. Parolaro D.

    Institution
    Department of Structural and Functional Biology, University of Insubria, via Dunant 3, 21100 Varese, Italy.

    Title
    The psychoactive ingredient of marijuana induces behavioural sensitization.

    Source
    European Journal of Neuroscience. 14(5):884-6, 2001 Sep.

    Abstract
    Here we describe, for the first time, the occurrence of behavioural sensitization after chronic exposure to Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Rats were treated twice a day, for five days, with increasing doses (5, 10, 20, 40, 40 mg/kg i.p.) of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol or its vehicle and after 20 days of withdrawal, animals were challenged with 5 mg/kg (i.p.) of the drug and their behaviour was assessed. Contrary to the motor inhibition induced in control rats, challenge with Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in pre-exposed animals elicited a complex behavioural syndrome mainly characterized by oral stereotyped items. Due to the relevance of behavioural sensitization in drug-seeking behaviour that persists long after discontinuation of drug use, our findings suggest that cannabinoids could trigger neurobiological alteration not dissimilar from those observed with more harmful abused drugs.

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