Is leaving before hurricane abandonment - page 11

Hello all, so I am located at the very end of south Florida near the keys! My question is simply this, I'm supposed to work weekend during this hurricane which some are saying could be deadly. I have... Read More

  1. by   AlabamaBelle
    I think the OP has already checked out of this thread (she posted this early on). But it does point out that she knows the area she lives in, she knows her job and her husband's. Should she have a disaster plan in place? For sure!

    I live in northeast Alabama and we are subject to tornadoes. We have a family (there are 3 of us) plan worked out. We have supplies that have been suggested our meteorologists (bicycle helmets, safe spot, batteries, weather radio, cellphones/electronics fully charged, bottled water, canned foods and a non-electric can opener, etc). We have also lived in North Carolina with similar conditions. When bad weather threatened, we knew to get our cars filled up, get the food in order, batteries, similar as above. We learned the hard way about preparations with Hurricane Hugo. Who knew that a hurricane would make it so far inland? Snow warnings are heeded as well. At the time of Hugo, I was not working. Once I began working in the hospital setting, I knew and accepted, that even as a lowly Unit Secretary (as well as any other worker in the facility), I was expected to be there. We would come in early, the shift prior, to a hotel nearby or to the hospital. I had plans in place for my children and their care. There was one time I was the only Unit Secretary in the whole hospital (large one, btw). I was placed in one unit and given access to all floors/units and was able to put in orders from there. I circulated around my division and had a pager that was given to all floors. As an RN, it's no different. I got there and continue to get there. My family has always had a plan since Hurricane Hugo.

    As has been stated, the weather emergency should not have been a surprise. Planning in all aspects of your life is essential.
  2. by   kp2016
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    Show me a list of those states. The government CANNOT compell a person no matter what thier job is as a civilian to put their life or property in danger.
    I didn't read it closely as I needed a license regardless but when I licensed in VA there was something about mandatory registering for disasters.
  3. by   SobreRN
    Quote from CNAbutLPN2be2017
    Hello all, so I am located at the very end of south Florida near the keys! My question is simply this, I'm supposed to work weekend during this hurricane which some are saying could be deadly. I have a small child and his safety is my priority. I want to evacuate but my job is saying that they could report me for abandonment. I really don't understand how because if I leave from my house, how have I abandoned their residents?? I am an LPN btw
    I think they can report you for abandonment. I live in the mountains, high risk for burning during summer and being buried in the snow during the winter; my husband and I have had a roommate last 4 years, not to make money from him more because he doesn't make enough to get by and it really puts our minds at ease having someone who works from home as we do have 4 dogs. If there were a fire I am sure I couldn't just leave prior to roads being closed so I would plan on not getting home (same with severe snow or if jail goes on lock-down.) Someone is caring for your son while you are at work, I would hope they would continue to do so if you could not make it home. Someone has t care for the residents and if it were a family member of yours I am guessing you would not want them abandoned.
  4. by   Here.I.Stand
    Someone is caring for your son while you are at work, I would hope they would continue to do so if you could not make it home
    This might work if family is watching him, but nearly all of the professional daycares in my area won't keep children past 1800... let alone keep a child for days. That's assuming that they haven't closed the daycare so the staff can safely evacuate.

    That's probably a moot point now, but generally easier said than done.

    Kind of like someone protesting calling off for a sick child, because we're "responsible for finding backup childcare." Um.... children typically are not allowed to go to daycare if sick, and most people can't just call up a stay-at-home parent friend and ask if you can expose their kids to the bug. And in any case, a sick child should be resting at home -- not be carted somewhere else.
  5. by   Skippingtowork
    The hospitals I know have provisions for you to bring your children to work with you if you have to work during a hurricane. Many people that work in health care do not have trusted family or friends around, and daycares are closed. Some people have suggested that the OP evacuate her child and then return. What an absurd proposition. If her family is is Georgia, do you know how long it will take her to get there? Also, hurricanes sometimes change course. Also, where the OP was located, she was under mandatory evacuation, and the hospital should be evacuating, so she need not worry about working. To stay would be negligence on the hospital's part. There is also an expectation that if a husband and wife have small children and both are in health care or emergency services, one must stay with the children if no other arrangements can be made. I hope the OP left with her child. I have been through hurricanes and blizzards and blizzards are safer.
  6. by   Purple_roses
    OP, how are you? Hopefully your area didn't get hit as badly as was expected. What did you end up doing? Hope it all worked out for you and hope you and your kiddo remained safe.
  7. by   PCzoonurse
    Sriram
    Last edit by PCzoonurse on Sep 17 : Reason: Wrong post
  8. by   Purplemommy
    [QUOTE=CNAbutLPN2be2017;9561267]Everyone's situation is different and I'm not gonna sit on here and argue about that. They put out schedules out at the end of last month for this month. Had I known about a hurricane at the time the schedule was made, I would have requested off.

    Oh my goodness! If your husband is a corrections officer and you have NO ONE who can take charge if your child, then you need to get out of healthcare. You can't both have jobs that require emergency response if you don't have backup for your children. Yes everyone's situation is different. But you owe it to patients AND your child to do what is best for BOTH of them. You're in healthcare. You are required to respond if needed to care for patients. If you can't fulfill that roll, find a job you can fully commit to. If your child was the patient you'd be horrified if that CNA/LPN/RN or any other discipline didn't show up to work in a hurricane because they didn't plan responsibly. You live in a state with hurricanes. That's your notice. You must always be prepared. I'm not sure what you decided to do, but I hope you get your ducks in a row ASAP before the next one comes around. You & your husband have some life decisions to make.
  9. by   Julius Seizure
    Hurricane Irma: Some workers risk being fired if they evacuate

    Relevant article about Florida laws regarding leaving if your job considers you essential personnel to work during the hurricane. (Spoiler alert: There is no state law protecting you from getting fired for leaving.)

    Also, I think its cute how the article only mentioned ER doctors as healthcare personnel who might have to stay during a hurricane. Maybe they think the docs just do it all like on TV during natural disasters
  10. by   ccharlonne
    I used to live in Florida and stayed at my hospital through a couple of hurricanes. My hospital was an emergency shelter and vent dependent people were sheltered there so they would have access to emergency power. Some observations:
    1. I was aware of the disaster plan and what was expected of me. As a single parent I was able to bring my 2 kids with me when I reported during a disaster. The hospital was focused on getting through the disaster safely, and cared about the safety of patients staff, and family members.
    2. All patients who could be discharged safely were discharged so they could evacuate. Those who could not be safely discharged remained in the hospital.
    3. Although I was at the hospital for several days, I was not working non-stop. The hospital provided meals and we had designated sleeping areas.
    After I left Florida and returned to New England, I worked through a blizzard and some bad winter storms. Again, the disaster plan was discussed during orientation so I knew what was expected of me.
    Yes, I would have liked it if I could have skipped going to work during disasters, but there is also such a sense of teamwork among everyone working together during the crisis that isn't there on regular work days. I love being a nurse, and accept that being "essential personnel" comes with some costs, but on the flip side there are also some intangible benefits.
    Just my $0.02. If I decided I didn't want to work during disasters, I would find a different job outside the hospital, but after 10 years I still love bedside nursing.
  11. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Purplemommy

    Oh my goodness! If your husband is a corrections officer and you have NO ONE who can take charge if your child, then you need to get out of healthcare. You can't both have jobs that require emergency response if you don't have backup for your children. Yes everyone's situation is different. But you owe it to patients AND your child to do what is best for BOTH of them. You're in healthcare. You are required to respond if needed to care for patients. If you can't fulfill that roll, find a job you can fully commit to. If your child was the patient you'd be horrified if that CNA/LPN/RN or any other discipline didn't show up to work in a hurricane because they didn't plan responsibly. You live in a state with hurricanes. That's your notice. You must always be prepared. I'm not sure what you decided to do, but I hope you get your ducks in a row ASAP before the next one comes around. You & your husband have some life decisions to make.
    Oh, yes! Divorce your husband ....put your child up for adoption. Do whatever it takes to make yourself available 24/7 for your per diem CNA job. And if you must be elsewhere at any given time when you've been asked to work, just cut yourself in half and leave your dying, bleeding stump to punch that time clock. It's of the utmost importance.
    Last edit by Sour Lemon on Sep 17
  12. by   pixierose
    [QUOTE=Purplemommy;9576416]
    Quote from CNAbutLPN2be2017
    Everyone's situation is different and I'm not gonna sit on here and argue about that. They put out schedules out at the end of last month for this month. Had I known about a hurricane at the time the schedule was made, I would have requested off.

    Oh my goodness! If your husband is a corrections officer and you have NO ONE who can take charge if your child, then you need to get out of healthcare. You can't both have jobs that require emergency response if you don't have backup for your children. Yes everyone's situation is different. But you owe it to patients AND your child to do what is best for BOTH of them. You're in healthcare. You are required to respond if needed to care for patients. If you can't fulfill that roll, find a job you can fully commit to. If your child was the patient you'd be horrified if that CNA/LPN/RN or any other discipline didn't show up to work in a hurricane because they didn't plan responsibly. You live in a state with hurricanes. That's your notice. You must always be prepared. I'm not sure what you decided to do, but I hope you get your ducks in a row ASAP before the next one comes around. You & your husband have some life decisions to make.
    Life decision #1: ignore this post...
  13. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Here.I.Stand
    This might work if family is watching him, but nearly all of the professional daycares in my area won't keep children past 1800... let alone keep a child for days. That's assuming that they haven't closed the daycare so the staff can safely evacuate.

    That's probably a moot point now, but generally easier said than done.

    Kind of like someone protesting calling off for a sick child, because we're "responsible for finding backup childcare." Um.... children typically are not allowed to go to daycare if sick, and most people can't just call up a stay-at-home parent friend and ask if you can expose their kids to the bug. And in any case, a sick child should be resting at home -- not be carted somewhere else.
    If your child is at a pro child care center, are they just going to throw him into the dirt? I can't imagine
    that happening if there is an emergency. At the very least, the day care needs to have the authorities
    take care of the child if the parents don't show up and they can't reach a parent-designated emergency contact person.

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