Is it right to sexually assist a paralysed patient? - page 4

How do you deal with the paralysed patient with frequent erections? Have you ever been asked to assist? I've never faced this but have seen a heated discussion on another forum. Is it humane to bring... Read More

  1. by   FutureArmyNurse
    I can't imagine actually helping a gentleman out with this problem, but I would certainly feel sorry for him and want to do it...I wouldn't be able to do it though. Too intimate in any situation.
  2. by   hobbes
    Quote from RN-Josey
    Whether or not a nurse would choose to relieve a patient if faced with this situation is something for the nurse to decide at that moment, keeping in mind that there definitely could be legal and job repercussions if some kind of prior approval was not obtained.

    I want to comment, though, more on the hypocrisy I hear stated throughout this thread. Several nurses have stated that this is an inappropriate question because either it's not something we are trained to do or because it is not a vital life or death function. And the tone used by these nurses is very sanctimonious and puritanical when making these arguments. I would ask these very same nurses, however, if they have ever prayed with a patient at the patient's request, or if they had encouraged prayer from a patient who hadn't brought the subject up themself. Prayer is neither something we are trained to do in nursing school nor is it a "vital" life or death function. Yet I will bet money that many, if not most, of the nurses who practically condemned the original poster for even asking the question would not think twice about praying with a patient, and probably have done so many times in the past. Thus their arguments about only doing what is medically necessary don't hold water, and in fact reveal them as hypocrites who object purely on their own moral grounds, not for any medical or professional reason.

    And just for the record, I am not opposed to a nurse praying with their patient if that helps comfort the patient. I also don't see a problem with a nurse objecting to masturbating a paralyzed patient on moral grounds (or objecting to prayer for the same reason). However, be honest in stating the reasons why you approve or disapprove, and don't act judgemental to those who hold a different moral viewpoint than your own.
    Well said!!!
  3. by   kyti
    We had a pt once who had had a cystoscopy ask the nurse working with me to "milk" his penis because there was a small drop of blood at the end of it (we work pacu) he said his wife (who was at the bedside) said it was ok. She politely refused. :chuckle
  4. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from RN-Josey
    Whether or not a nurse would choose to relieve a patient if faced with this situation is something for the nurse to decide at that moment, keeping in mind that there definitely could be legal and job repercussions if some kind of prior approval was not obtained.QUOTE>>>>>>>Not exactly-I can read all about it at the Pa.BON website...The rules and regulations and scope of practice are quite explicit...>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>

    I want to comment, though, more on the hypocrisy I hear stated throughout this thread. Several nurses have stated that this is an inappropriate question because either it's not something we are trained to do or because it is not a vital life or death function. And the tone used by these nurses is very sanctimonious and puritanical when making these arguments. I would ask these very same nurses, however, if they have ever prayed with a patient at the patient's request, or if they had encouraged prayer from a patient who hadn't brought the subject up themself. Prayer is neither something we are trained to do in nursing school nor is it a "vital" life or death function. Yet I will bet money that many, if not most, of the nurses who practically condemned the original poster for even asking the question would not think twice about praying with a patient, and probably have done so many times in the past. Thus their arguments about only doing what is medically necessary don't hold water, and in fact reveal them as hypocrites who object purely on their own moral grounds, not for any medical or professional reason.

    And just for the record, I am not opposed to a nurse praying with their patient if that helps comfort the patient. I also don't see a problem with a nurse objecting to masturbating a paralyzed patient on moral grounds (or objecting to prayer for the same reason). However, be honest in stating the reasons why you approve or disapprove, and don't act judgemental to those who hold a different moral viewpoint than your own.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>I missed the sactimonious or puritanical remarks-I just don't see a correlation between praying with and masturbating a patient....That's a really faulty analogy,IMHO...I stand by my opinion....(I don't pray,either-I may bow my head for a moment of silence or more likely I will just leave the room...I will call the priest or minister for the patient....If I had an alert and oreinted pt with sexual needs I would try to get them some help(as another poster stated-counseling,OT,etc)) But calling in a prostitute is NOT legal...calling a priest is....Maybe we could pray the erection away?
  5. by   psychomachia
    Quote from MandyInMS
    hmmm...how would they charge that procedure anyway? would it be considered a treatment? physical therapy (massage)? errrrr whatttttt? hehe...j/k

    Remember, use lube, whisper sweet nothings in his ear, and GET THE MONEY FIRST...
  6. by   nurseunderwater
    Quote from hobbes
    Speak for youself. IMHO, life without release (assuming your sexually normal) is not worth living.

    hmm...I guess the dahli lamas life is a waste....monks practice abstinence...

    not one of the abc's. it's optional - i might suggest biofeedback or relaxation excercises - oh, and there are plenty of "massage therapists" in the free paper (no offense to the real deal)
  7. by   busyrninva
    I don't know if I should actually give that any response, or keep laughing. You CANNOT actually be serious. Anyways, thanks for the laugh.
  8. by   BRANDY LPN
    I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly, to pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully. I will abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and will not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug. I will do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession, and will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of my calling. With loyalty will I endeavor to aid the physician, in his work, and devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care.


    I think this would be a dirrect conflict, I am a nurse not a prostitute.
  9. by   SharonH, RN
    Well this is certainly a new one on me. It is not an option of course. I have taken care of paraplegics and quads who had involuntary erections during or after straight cath. I just pretended I didn't notice and went on my way. The patients have all sorts of needs that I will not or cannot help them with.
  10. by   NursesRmofun
    When I was a nurses' aide many moons ago in another life, I suspected that one or two of the other nurses' aides were doing this kind of thing with one particular patient. I had no proof. I never asked. I just suspected. Some things were suspicious...like a closed door for long periods with one of the aides in the room during the evening, before the patient went to bed or even got ready for bed. The nurses usually didn't pay much attention to the activities on the unit. They gave their meds out and did their thing without checking on much else.
    I believe these patients have needs, physical or emotional or both, but I think they ought to have outside friends and significant others to help them out..not staff.
  11. by   ferfer
    Quote from RN-Josey
    Whether or not a nurse would choose to relieve a patient if faced with this situation is something for the nurse to decide at that moment, keeping in mind that there definitely could be legal and job repercussions if some kind of prior approval was not obtained.

    I want to comment, though, more on the hypocrisy I hear stated throughout this thread. Several nurses have stated that this is an inappropriate question because either it's not something we are trained to do or because it is not a vital life or death function. And the tone used by these nurses is very sanctimonious and puritanical when making these arguments. I would ask these very same nurses, however, if they have ever prayed with a patient at the patient's request, or if they had encouraged prayer from a patient who hadn't brought the subject up themself. Prayer is neither something we are trained to do in nursing school nor is it a "vital" life or death function. Yet I will bet money that many, if not most, of the nurses who practically condemned the original poster for even asking the question would not think twice about praying with a patient, and probably have done so many times in the past. Thus their arguments about only doing what is medically necessary don't hold water, and in fact reveal them as hypocrites who object purely on their own moral grounds, not for any medical or professional reason.

    And just for the record, I am not opposed to a nurse praying with their patient if that helps comfort the patient. I also don't see a problem with a nurse objecting to masturbating a paralyzed patient on moral grounds (or objecting to prayer for the same reason). However, be honest in stating the reasons why you approve or disapprove, and don't act judgemental to those who hold a different moral viewpoint than your own.
    :uhoh21: Lighten up, go for a jog, realize not everyone is gonna say things you like
    Last edit by canoehead on Apr 6, '04 : Reason: personal attack
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    So where is the OP on this? another drive-by posting designed to stir up trouble? People have asked what you would do and I think it more than fair you ANSWER. But I suspect this is just a thread for someone to sit back and ooh and ah and perhaps laugh over.
  13. by   RN-Josey
    Quote from ferfer
    :uhoh21: Nut bar .........by you making this statement, you yourself are being judgmental of others. Lighten up, go for a jog, realize not everyone is gonna say things you like
    Wow, you make such an eloquent, persuasive, and well thought out argument. Clearly your enlightened postings raise the professionalism of this entire chat board. I thank you for engaging in mature dialogue on the topics and responses that you personally find distasteful. And using a revamped version of the old childhood classic of "I know you are, but what am I!" is pure genius. Clearly I dare not engage in a battle of wits with someone who comes armed with such snappy barbs.

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