Is email acceptable for resignation? - page 2

I am out on an loa, and wont be returning to my full time job. I work in an OR, so to hand deliver a resignation letter would mean , going in, dressing in scrubs to get it to my manager in her office... Read More

  1. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from RealNurseWitch
    Um, I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I have a related question...

    I will be taking a leave of absence starting around the 16th of February, which is supposed to last until the 1st of April. During that period of time, I plan on doing some interviews and hopefully landing a new job. At this time, I haven't mentioned to my employers that I will be searching for a new job. Would it be okay to give two weeks notice while on my leave of absence?

    See, technically while I'm on leave, I don't think I'll actually even be an employee here anymore, TECHNICALLY. Meaning, I'm not FMLA eligible so they don't have to even hold my job. However, employee policy says that anyone who has been employed six months or more is eligible to take a leave of absence BUT will not receive benefits during that time and is not guaranteed the same job when they return. However, when and if I come back after the six weeks, everything will be reinstated as it was when I left.

    So, am I making any sense? Probably not. Basically, I don't really want to mention anything to my employer, but since they aren't expecting me back until the 1st of April anyway, shouldn't it be okay to give two-three weeks notice sometime in March? (I think this employer only requires two weeks).
    Which brings me to my other "dilemma"!!!!!
    I *am* on medical leave. I plan on not returning to this f/t job, since it is contributing to my ilness....anyway, I plan on looking for another position . Is that *ok* to do while out on fmla? I mean, I cant do that job, but I can do others.I know my employer might not be happy, but ........
  2. by   Katnip
    Quote from RealNurseWitch
    Um, I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I have a related question...

    I will be taking a leave of absence starting around the 16th of February, which is supposed to last until the 1st of April. During that period of time, I plan on doing some interviews and hopefully landing a new job. At this time, I haven't mentioned to my employers that I will be searching for a new job. Would it be okay to give two weeks notice while on my leave of absence?

    See, technically while I'm on leave, I don't think I'll actually even be an employee here anymore, TECHNICALLY. Meaning, I'm not FMLA eligible so they don't have to even hold my job. However, employee policy says that anyone who has been employed six months or more is eligible to take a leave of absence BUT will not receive benefits during that time and is not guaranteed the same job when they return. However, when and if I come back after the six weeks, everything will be reinstated as it was when I left.

    So, am I making any sense? Probably not. Basically, I don't really want to mention anything to my employer, but since they aren't expecting me back until the 1st of April anyway, shouldn't it be okay to give two-three weeks notice sometime in March? (I think this employer only requires two weeks).
    Check the hospital policy. They don't usually allow leave or vacation time to count as the last two weeks.
  3. by   Katnip
    To the OP.

    No, I would give my resignation in person. It's a vasic courtesy to deliver the news face to face. Believe me, I don't like to do it either, but it shows that you're professional enough to handle these things properly.
  4. by   AlabamaBelle
    FWIT: I must agree with the majority of posters. The most professional thing to do is to hand deliver a letter of resignation to you NM. This way, the old "I didn't get it" "It must have gotten lost in cyberspace" can't come back to haunt. I've seen that happen and it wasn't pretty. More complications for the employees that it was worth. Sure, it won't be comfortable or very pleasant, but it is, in the long run, the safest way to go.

    Cindy
  5. by   SharonH, RN
    On the surface, it may seem unprofessional but since email is an accepted form of business communication these days, I don't see why not. As long as the email is composed professionally and you cc human resources on the email with your manager, I think you would be okay. I have to confess that I did it almost 4 years ago when I left my last acute care job and it doesn't seem to have affected me (but who knows?).
  6. by   wonderbee
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    Which brings me to my other "dilemma"!!!!!
    I *am* on medical leave. I plan on not returning to this f/t job, since it is contributing to my ilness....anyway, I plan on looking for another position . Is that *ok* to do while out on fmla? I mean, I cant do that job, but I can do others.I know my employer might not be happy, but ........
    I've just done what you're contemplating. The difference is I have been in full communication with my unit director throughout my leave, which is now going on two months, and have never made a secret of the direction my FMLA might take. Since I'm not in staffing and am on no future schedule, there doesn't seem to be a problem. Because we've been in such close communication, I felt perfectly comfortable sending an email letter of resignation.

    I would never state in writing that I am leaving due to illness. You never know when a letter like that might come back to bite you in the butt. But I think it would be good to meet with your manager to give her the real scoop face to face.
  7. by   Chaya
    To RNOTODAY:
    It would be accepable to phone your manager and tell her that regretfully, you will have to leave the position. Tell her you will be following up this call with a written notice of your resignation (send this snail mail).
  8. by   canoehead
    Email or phone call sounds OK to me but follow up with a written letter via USPS. I don't see any reason to go in personally, making an appt to resign sounds like a waste of time for both of you.
  9. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    I've just done what you're contemplating. The difference is I have been in full communication with my unit director throughout my leave, which is now going on two months, and have never made a secret of the direction my FMLA might take. Since I'm not in staffing and am on no future schedule, there doesn't seem to be a problem. Because we've been in such close communication, I felt perfectly comfortable sending an email letter of resignation.

    I would never state in writing that I am leaving due to illness. You never know when a letter like that might come back to bite you in the butt. But I think it would be good to meet with your manager to give her the real scoop face to face.

    kittykat, elaborate? re: the not stating the illness in resignation letter...I was thinking of doing this... I thought it would sound better
  10. by   burnay76
    I resigned my most recent position via e-mail. In many places e-mail is the most common and even preferred way of day to day communication. I explained that I was resigning and would also be glad to submit a hard copy. I further explained that I submitted via e-mail first so that I could make my manager aware ASAP. I also invited the manager to call me at her convenience, which she did. I resigned on very good terms and was even asked by the manager to keep in touch via e-mail on how the new job was going. So e-mail certainly has it's place if you use it for the right reasons, not just to avoid any in person contact. It certainly can make breaking the news easier.
  11. by   hospitalstaph
    I am curious about this too. What if you have only worked less than 10 shifts and it is OBVIOUS that this is not what you were told your position would entail?? Then is email resignation OK?

    TL
  12. by   RN 4 Life
    No, I think you should refrain from using email. Face to face is the best, maybe you can ask your manager to meet you in the hospital cafeteria for a confidential meeting and briefly discuss with him or her your concerns and then provide him or her with your formal letter of resignation.
  13. by   wonderbee
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    kittykat, elaborate? re: the not stating the illness in resignation letter...I was thinking of doing this... I thought it would sound better
    Forgive me but I'm an old legal secretary. I'm just careful about written statements. When you go for another job, you want to put your best foot forward. You will be asked if you are able to do the job for which you are hired and most likely will have to sign some pre-employment paperwork to that effect. Personally, I feel more comfortable knowing there isn't a piece of paper floating around a file somewhere where I said I was having a problem in that area that could later be held against me as making a fraudulent statement. This is why I advise something kind of vague in writing. Heck, you don't have to give any reason at all in your letter but I would state due to "circumstances" and be flowing with the grattitude for a good experience. Like I said, years as a legal secretary. It's probably made me a bit paranoid.

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