Is becoming a Nurse hard?

  1. 0 Hi, I'm new and I would like to introduce myself. I'm very interested in becoming a nurse. I'm 42 years of age, I'm a single parent with 2 teenage daughters. I never been to college and I have applied at some schools and are waiting to hear back. I have been reading some of your topics, and they are very interesting. I have so many questions and concerns, but I'll keep it to a minimum. My first question: Is becoming a nurse hard?
    Last edit by NA NA on Jun 16, '04
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  3. Visit  NA NA profile page

    About NA NA

    Joined Jun '04; Posts: 6.

    38 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Katnip profile page
    0
    That depends on your definition of hard.

    It's very time consuming, and requires a LOT of studying. If you haven't ever been to college and it's a been a long time since you've taken any kind of class, I'd suggest taking one or two classes first, just to get used to the routine. Jumping in fulltime might be a terrible shock.

    Are you planning to become an LPN then an RN? What kind of time frame do you have? Do you have to work while going to school? Those things will have an enormous impact on how you go about it.

    Don't be afraid of bombarding everyone with questions here. Most of us LOVE them.

    Welcome to the boards, and welcome to nursing. :hatparty:
  5. Visit  uk_nurse profile page
    0
    i didnt find the academic work or placements too difficult. Mt problem was when i was training i had young children 2 yr old 3 yr 7 yr old. I must admit what helped me was having support from my hubby and family. It was hard juggling and finding time to do assignments etc, but hey it was worth it. I managed it. I hadnt studied for years but soon got back into it. i was tired alot of time but glad i did it.

    good luck in whatever you decide.
  6. Visit  Nurse Ratched profile page
    0
    Becoming a nurse isn't as hard as being a nurse .

    There were a ton of hoops to jump through getting there - physical and innumerable vaccinations just to get into the program, pre-requisites, then the actual nursing program part. Friends and I commuted together 1-1 1/2 hours each way daily for classes. I also worked full time but had no kids to be responsible for.

    Looking back, I sometimes wonder how I managed.

    My recommendation is not to think of the big picture - that's WAY too overwhelming. Take each little step at a time.

    I will also say I wouldn't trade being a nurse for anything.
  7. Visit  mattsmom81 profile page
    0
    Good answers posted here. My question to you is how were your grades in high school...and did you do well in the sciences, were you inclined to academics?

    There is a lot of studying and learning involved in nursing programs...more basic for LPN, indepth for RN.....and the prereqs for RN can be difficult for someone who is not academically inclined....grades are required to be high for admittance to the upper level nursing courses, I hear. This was the same when I went through school 30 years ago.

    I did LPN first and worked my way through RN school. I don't regret it, family needed the income. It is hard to work fulltime through RN school but many facilities will accomodate a student and even help with tuition reimbursement, in return for a period of employment following graduation.

    If you like academics and can go to school 4 yrs (ie have hubby's income and savings to accomodate this ) and know you want the RN credential, consider a 4 yr degree (BSN) It affords you more opportunities to advance/move into other areas of nursing should you wish.

    If you want bedside nursing a few years sooner, consider LPN (quicker) or ADN (RN pay, faster than BSN).

    Best wishes to you in your quest...nursing is not for everyone but there ARE lots of options and a variety of opportunities out there.
  8. Visit  NA NA profile page
    0
    Thanks for responding back to me. I would like to become an RN Nurse. I have applied at some two years colleges. I was laid off my job recently and is now seeking employment. My ideas is to work evening shift at a hospital
    and go to school full time during the day. My previous job was in the insurance Industry (15 years of experience). I haven't been happy doing what I was doing and it just wasn't paying me the type salary I desire, therefore since I've been laid off recently this is my opportunity to consider other careers and nursing is definiteky one that I'm seriously considering. One thing I love is helping people and to be honest I'm not sure if nursing is where I really need to be, that's why I'm glad I found this chat line to ask questions and ask for suggestions. I've been told by others that I have some very good study habits and I didn't even realize I had them until I was taking some insurance courses that was very time consuming. Another question I have is should I expect to make good monie when I complete the nursing program for 2 years or will it take some time.
    Quote from cyberkat
    That depends on your definition of hard.

    It's very time consuming, and requires a LOT of studying. If you haven't ever been to college and it's a been a long time since you've taken any kind of class, I'd suggest taking one or two classes first, just to get used to the routine. Jumping in fulltime might be a terrible shock.

    Are you planning to become an LPN then an RN? What kind of time frame do you have? Do you have to work while going to school? Those things will have an enormous impact on how you go about it.

    Don't be afraid of bombarding everyone with questions here. Most of us LOVE them.

    Welcome to the boards, and welcome to nursing. :hatparty:
  9. Visit  Tweety profile page
    1
    Nursing School was one of the toughest, hardest, demanding things I've ever done. I too was an "adult" student. I made mostly A's but had to work at it.

    Bottom line if you really want to be a nurse, you'll make it through school no matter how difficult or time-consuming it is.

    Good luck.
    Krystalia likes this.
  10. Visit  Dixiedi profile page
    0
    Quote from NA NA
    Hi, I'm new and I would like to introduce myself. I'm very interested in becoming a nurse. I'm 42 years of age, I'm a single parent with 2 teenage daughters. I never been to college and I have applied at some schools and are waiting to hear back. I have been reading some of your topics, and they are very interesting. I have so many questions and concerns, but I'll keep it to a minimum. My first question: Is becoming a nurse hard?
    "Hard" has nothing to do with which program you are interested in entering. It's more like how much time can you spare before you have full time work that pays.

    LPN school is no "easier or "harder" than RN school. RN programs are longer, therfore they "go into a more detail" than LPN programs do. This is not actually harder because the natural flow is followed. Compare it to babies, they learn to sit then stand. In the LPN program you will learn to sit, in the RN program you will learn to sit and then to stand. LPNs graduate sitting, find work and then learn to stand, forever earning less money and with fewer opportunities for advancement. RNs graduate already standing, therefore they make more money and have more opportunities for advancement.
  11. Visit  TexasPoodleMix profile page
    0
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    I will also say I wouldn't trade being a nurse for anything.
    As someone going into nursing next year, i really like hearing that, it gives me hope !
  12. Visit  Dixiedi profile page
    0
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    Becoming a nurse isn't as hard as being a nurse .

    There were a ton of hoops to jump through getting there - physical and innumerable vaccinations just to get into the program, pre-requisites, then the actual nursing program part. Friends and I commuted together 1-1 1/2 hours each way daily for classes. I also worked full time but had no kids to be responsible for.

    Looking back, I sometimes wonder how I managed.

    My recommendation is not to think of the big picture - that's WAY too overwhelming. Take each little step at a time.

    I will also say I wouldn't trade being a nurse for anything.
    Here's the right answer! And to add to that last sentence let me say, I left nursing for a bit. Tried out corporate America. I drove a truck cross country and after I broke my hip I started my own business setting up data bases for small businesses. (I love computers and all you can do with them and learned these things even while I was driving. I drove solo, so it wsa just me, my schedule and the computer.) Anyway, after it was all said and done, I came back to nursing. There really isn't anything better for me!
  13. Visit  Rhoresmith profile page
    0
    Hard yes, because it is very fast paced and you have to make many sacrafices, time with your family, sleep, and I believe even a little sanity. I can't say if being a nurse is harder since I am not there yet but I know that this is one of the toughest things I have ever done and I am not a spring chicken so I have been around the block a few times. I think that when I get there I will appreciate it so much more because I had to work so hard to get there just my two cents
    Rhonda
  14. Visit  SmilingBluEyes profile page
    0
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    Becoming a nurse isn't as hard as being a nurse .

    My recommendation is not to think of the big picture - that's WAY too overwhelming. Take each little step at a time.

    I will also say I wouldn't trade being a nurse for anything.

    describes it perfectly!
  15. Visit  karenG profile page
    0
    the hardest thing for me was the way your thinking changes!! just read some of the threads about 'ways to tell a nurse' etc You start as an innocent and become very worldly wise very quickly! You also develope a very odd SOH- very black and truly wicked! we all seem to have the same SOH!! I also lost a load of friends but gained loads of new!

    But there is nothing else I would do!

    good luck

    Karen


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