Is becoming a Nurse hard? - page 3

Hi, I'm new and I would like to introduce myself. I'm very interested in becoming a nurse. I'm 42 years of age, I'm a single parent with 2 teenage daughters. I never been to college and I have... Read More

  1. by   NA NA
    thanks so much for your advice....
    Quote from SCRN1
    Thanks. Even though it has it's ups & downs (as MOST kinds of jobs do), I really do enjoy nursing and wish I'd started right out of high school. I wanted then to either be a nurse or a teacher, but my guidance counselor talked me out of it and to go to college to become a CPA instead. I tried, but while in college that go-round, I was miserable. When I later decided to go back to school, I decided to go into what I wanted to do and have had no regrets since.
  2. by   Dayray
    yes it is








    (typeing this to make message at least ten letters)
  3. by   loerith
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    Becoming a nurse isn't as hard as being a nurse .

    There were a ton of hoops to jump through getting there - physical and innumerable vaccinations just to get into the program, pre-requisites, then the actual nursing program part. Friends and I commuted together 1-1 1/2 hours each way daily for classes. I also worked full time but had no kids to be responsible for.

    Looking back, I sometimes wonder how I managed.

    My recommendation is not to think of the big picture - that's WAY too overwhelming. Take each little step at a time.

    I will also say I wouldn't trade being a nurse for anything.
    I would definitely agree that being a nurse is much tuffer than studying to become one. And honestly , at this point in time there are many things I would trade for being a nurse.


    Love and Peace,
    loerith
  4. by   goodn
    I too, am about to start nursing school (ADN). I have a previous degree (BSed), so have most of the nonnursing coursework done. I am finishing the A & P this summer, and will have only Nutrition and Microbiology during my official nursing school time. I start in the fall with only 2 nursing classes. My question is this. With all the other coursework out of the way except for the above mentioned Nutrition and Microbiology, will I still be strapped to find time for my family? My youngest is in school this fall. And then, I wonder about those sick kid days? Also, how does a previous bachelors degree help in the transition to a BSN. I would like to enter school nursing among other things. Will my education degree help in that aspect? Thanks. Joa :spin:
  5. by   RNIAM
    Having just passed the boards I can say without a doubt it was the hardest thing up to this point that I have ever done! I was tired from staying up the night before clinical writing care plans. I had no social life and missed my husband and children as I never had any time to be with them. My stress level was through the roof. Having said all that would I do it again. Absolutely!! I loved most of it. The stuff I didn't like I tolerated so that I could enjoy what I did like. I agree that the best way to get through nursing school is to take it day by day. Never look too far ahead or it will seem overwhelming. Good luck to you.
  6. by   Diaphoretic
    I just graduated from LPN school in May and it was one of the hardest things I have ever done in my life but very rewarding... I am going back for my RN in the spring I just need a break and need to make some money. I encourage you to go be a nurse if you feel that you are being called to do so. I LOVE IT.
  7. by   Katnip
    Na_Na, to start, you need to choose the program you're most interested in. All nursing schools require prerequisites. Most require at least one English course, biology, anatomy and physiology, a psych or two, sociology, and some require chemistry as well as a few optional things.

    After prereqs are done, or just before they're done, you apply to the nursing program itself. I know of at least one ADN program that will allow you to take some prereqs with the nursing program.

    Grab a catalog from the school, look at what they require. You will probably be tested in English and Math when you apply to the college so they can place you. If you don't do as well as they want, then you might have to take a remedial course. But I doubt you'll have problems there.

    Get an appointment with the head of the nursing department as well. Make good use of the college counselors as well.

    Edited to add: Don't sweat the age thing. I was 46 when I graduated. It sounds like you've got the smarts, the study skills, and the family support you need. Not to mention the support here. Go for it!
    Last edit by Katnip on Jun 21, '04
  8. by   nursemike
    Quote from joa
    I too, am about to start nursing school (ADN). I have a previous degree (BSed), so have most of the nonnursing coursework done. I am finishing the A & P this summer, and will have only Nutrition and Microbiology during my official nursing school time. I start in the fall with only 2 nursing classes. My question is this. With all the other coursework out of the way except for the above mentioned Nutrition and Microbiology, will I still be strapped to find time for my family? My youngest is in school this fall. And then, I wonder about those sick kid days? Also, how does a previous bachelors degree help in the transition to a BSN. I would like to enter school nursing among other things. Will my education degree help in that aspect? Thanks. Joa :spin:
    One of my instructors frankly admitted that, yes, nursing school pretty well eats up your whole life, but at least it's only for a couple of years. Well, obviously, a lot of us can't or won't let it eat our whole lives, but it will certainly try. Some of my classmates have most or all support courses done, and it appears to help, but it's still definitely a bear. Being willing to settle for an occassional B helps, too, but any way you look at it, it's a major undertaking. I find that I neglect my job and family for school and neglect school and family for my job. So it really helps if your family is supportive, and it's essential to be able to juggle. I try to avoid "crisis management" as much as possible, but I think a certain amount is inevitable. However, I would also say that it is doable, as long as you can get the material and are highly motivated. Those who expect to get by without much effort are probably doomed, and most over-achievers can probably expect to learn some humility.
    Almost everyone I've talked to has felt like quitting during our first year, but it gets better once you get past that. Still hard, but not quite so overwhelming.
    The near-certainty that I will face similar moments of despair after nursing school is kind of alarming, but I hope getting through it once will make it more tolerable.
    My carpool has been a huge support, as well as a study group. I heartily recommend a study group of some sort, both for the help in studying and for the network of friends to vent with. Seriously--get all the help you possibly can. But if you are really ready for this, you'll love it, even when you hate it.
    Study hard as you can, as much as your life allows, then sharpen your pencils and pray. Good luck.
  9. by   Sunita428
    Hi. I am currently a focused junior in high school, & am very serious about becoming a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. If you happen to know any information like: # of years, salary ranges, complications, etc. I would greatly appreciate it. Thank You!!!!!
  10. by   SaintRN
    I was 31 when I went back to school to become an RN and I just took my boards last week and passed. I found it was alot of work and alot of sleepless nights when you have a family, but you can do it if you really want it. Most of my classmates were my age or older and made it. I 1st semester is the hardest. After that, it pretty much just falls into place because of your life experiences.

    Good luck. I'm sure you'll do great!

    Quote from NA NA
    Hi, I'm new and I would like to introduce myself. I'm very interested in becoming a nurse. I'm 42 years of age, I'm a single parent with 2 teenage daughters. I never been to college and I have applied at some schools and are waiting to hear back. I have been reading some of your topics, and they are very interesting. I have so many questions and concerns, but I'll keep it to a minimum. My first question: Is becoming a nurse hard?
  11. by   NurseyBaby'05
    Quote from SCRN1
    I went to nursing school when my baby entered 1st grade. The hardest part for me was not being able to spend as much time doing fun things with my family as I had been accustomed. They didn't understand why they had to keep the noise level down when mommy was studying for a big exam. But, all in all, everything worked out and I would go back and do it all over again. Since your kids are older, they probably have their own social life which would allow you the time to study and aren't quite as dependant on you as young children are.

    Something else I found interesting was that as an adult student, I actually loved classes that I hated in high school, like Anatomy & Physiology. Kinda like how you like certain foods as an adult that you hated as a kid, LOL. I'd made pretty good grades in high school, but made even better ones and enjoyed studying while in nursing school. Maybe it was the maturity and maybe because as a teenager, it got in the way of my busy social life. I was told by some instructors that they've found adult students do actually do better...as a whole. (This is not to discourage younger students, nor give them the idea I'm meaning all younger students.)

    There are tons of nurses who become nurses as "older" adults. If you are interested in nursing, I say GO FOR IT.
    Amen! In high school I was English/History/Language buff. I never thought I would study science in college, let alone get good grades. I had an epiphany last month as to why. I was really good at writing and talking (big surprise! :chuckle ), but I hated it(writing, that is. I haven't shut up since I was nine months old. Hehehehe!). I hate to write papers. That was my downfall in previous science classes, I didn't do lab reports. I actually really enjoyed the material. It's shocking how much easier things are because I WANT to do them. So, yes, to answer your question, nursing school is hard, but if you want to do it, it's worth it and it doesn't seem so bad. It's very rewarding.
  12. by   hao27
    New to the message board! I'm making a career change into nursing and was wondering if anyone out there has had any experience with accelerated, combined programs - BSN + Masters. I'm looking into a few (specifically in NYC) and know that they definitely require pre-reqs.

    Without a ton of savings to fall back on I'm hoping to complete the program the shortest period of time possible to get back into the workforce. Any information on how long it took anyone who attacked this from a similar angle? Any idea how competitive these sorts of programs are and anything that could help give you an edge to get in?

    Appreciate the guidance!
  13. by   mrmedical
    Just my 2c, but you can't think of nursing school, even the two year degree's, as a get rich quick scheme or even for job security. It's a commonly perpetuate myth that nurses are somehow always needed - hospitals will either use less staff or cheaper and lesser trained individuals to fill demand in a poor economy. There are many other disciplines that have less demanding coursework that will net you good pay with positive workforce growth. As healthcare costs and insurance returns diminish, even medical staff is not safe from being laid off or staff size diminished.

    Consider: the number of nursing jobs at an RN level is either decreasing due to employers cutting spots or constant and the number of RN new grads is increasing coupled with older RNs going back into the workforce makes securing a job very much a competition especially in metropolitan or major cities. Rural areas are less prone to this, but not completely exempt.

    Another thing, you can't go in with the idea that you'll be suddenly revered and respected either: floor nursing is very much akin to labor or a trade moreso than a profession especially on the task-oriented medsurg floors. Doctors/midlevels/patients often times view nurses as "the help".

    So ask yourself why is the reason to do nursing. If it's the money or job security, I would say seriously considering something else.

    The coursework isn't exactly mentally hard or conceptually challenging, but I would say it is very, VERY tedious and time consuming and unless you have a good support system their will be family time sacrifices made. It's not all hopeless, I knew several middle age women I went to school with who could juggle family and school. It's just gonna be stressful and you're going to need support.

    That said, I'm trying to be as realistic as possible and not discourage you, but not to sugar coat it either.

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