Is becoming a Nurse hard? - page 2

Hi, I'm new and I would like to introduce myself. I'm very interested in becoming a nurse. I'm 42 years of age, I'm a single parent with 2 teenage daughters. I never been to college and I have... Read More

  1. by   TexasPoodleMix
    I am NOT nurse so I can't speak 100% but I think there are aspects to every career/ job that suck. There are ALWAYS a**holes in every field just lurking and planning schemes. Every job and field I have been in there have been PITAs. I just learn to ignore them. One thing I cannot do is kiss butt. I just can't do it.... I am nice, respectful, polite, verypositive etc. but I just can't kiss butt.
  2. by   NA NA
    Thanks... I'm glad to hear positive feed back. I know it not going to be easy, but it's always good to know some one else been down that road as well and made it. My daughters are both teenagers. 13 and 16. I know they will be very supportive and understanding because they're very mature and respectful girls. I may have to work with them on not being so lazy, but they will support me in all other areas. I do have a question: Are you and ASN NURSE OR A BSN NURSE and are you please with the money you making after going back to school for nursing?
    Quote from uk_nurse
    i didnt find the academic work or placements too difficult. Mt problem was when i was training i had young children 2 yr old 3 yr 7 yr old. I must admit what helped me was having support from my hubby and family. It was hard juggling and finding time to do assignments etc, but hey it was worth it. I managed it. I hadnt studied for years but soon got back into it. i was tired alot of time but glad i did it.

    good luck in whatever you decide.
  3. by   Loraineo
    Hi, I am 39 years old and just passed my boards (RN). Age helped me. When I was younger I never took things seriously. If you really want this -- you can do it. Since I have a full time job and a family with 3 kids I decided to go to school part time. You could consider that route, it would only add approximately 1 year to your program. Even part time You must put forth alot of effortand study time to pass the classes. There are many study hours but it pays off. I not only have a new profession, but new friends for life. Good luck to you in the future.
  4. by   lifeisbeautiful
    I found Nursing school very hard. The hours the non-stop clinicals, etc. I also had a couple of instructors that I think enjoyed trying to make people cry. Thank god they never "broke" me. If people did cry, they would say something mean like, "If you think I am being tough, wait until you are working with Nurses with 20yrs experience that might not care for you". A rude thing to say, but very true (as I quickly learned when I first started working just out of school). It is just a matter of finding your niche where ever you may be. Good Luck!!


    PS I find Nursing to be a lot more physically demanding than I thought it would be! Being on my feet so much has caused me to get plantar faciitis and I had to get cortisone shots in the bottom of my feet or I was practically unable to walk!! Moving people can be hard on the back, too, so always get help!
  5. by   karenG
    Quote from lifeisbeautiful
    I found Nursing school very hard. The hours the non-stop clinicals, etc. I also had a couple of instructors that I think enjoyed trying to make people cry. Thank god they never "broke" me. If people did cry, they would say something mean like, "If you think I am being tough, wait until you are working with Nurses with 20yrs experience that might not care for you". A rude thing to say, but very true (as I quickly learned when I first started working just out of school). It is just a matter of finding your niche where ever you may be. Good Luck!!


    what a shame you had instructors with this attitude. I have been a nurse over 20yrs and would not do that!! nursing is hard enough, physically and emotionally without being given a hard time by your instructors. I remember what being a student was like (maybe cos I keep doing more study!) and think todays students dont have half as much fun as we had as students!

    Karen
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from NA NA
    Are you and ASN NURSE OR A BSN NURSE and are you please with the money you making after going back to school for nursing?

    I'm an Associate Degree nurse. There are all kinds of threads about this very subject ASN vs. BSN.

    Basically, both degrees get you to the bedside, passing the same RN exam (NCLEX), and making just about the same amount of money.

    The BSN is an investment in the future, it allows for more job options later on down the line in other areas of nursing besides the bedside and gives you a competetive edge and a more well-rounded education.

    Go for the BSN if able is what I always advice folks. But ADNs are excellent nurses and do o.k. in the money department. I'm quite happy with the money I make as an ADN. I'd like to have a BSN in case this isn't what I want to be doing 20 years from now when I'm 65 and still have ten more years to work.

    Good luck!
  7. by   nursemike
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    Becoming a nurse isn't as hard as being a nurse .
    Uh-oh. Is it too late to change my major?
  8. by   cabbage patch rn
    From my own personal perspective, yes it was hard and required intense studying. But it was so much easier to study and prepare since I found it very interesting and satisfying.
  9. by   SCRN1
    I went to nursing school when my baby entered 1st grade. The hardest part for me was not being able to spend as much time doing fun things with my family as I had been accustomed. They didn't understand why they had to keep the noise level down when mommy was studying for a big exam. But, all in all, everything worked out and I would go back and do it all over again. Since your kids are older, they probably have their own social life which would allow you the time to study and aren't quite as dependant on you as young children are.

    Something else I found interesting was that as an adult student, I actually loved classes that I hated in high school, like Anatomy & Physiology. Kinda like how you like certain foods as an adult that you hated as a kid, LOL. I'd made pretty good grades in high school, but made even better ones and enjoyed studying while in nursing school. Maybe it was the maturity and maybe because as a teenager, it got in the way of my busy social life. I was told by some instructors that they've found adult students do actually do better...as a whole. (This is not to discourage younger students, nor give them the idea I'm meaning all younger students.)

    There are tons of nurses who become nurses as "older" adults. If you are interested in nursing, I say GO FOR IT.
  10. by   TexasPoodleMix
    Great post, SCRN! How are you liking nursing as a profession ?



    Quote from SCRN1
    I went to nursing school when my baby entered 1st grade. The hardest part for me was not being able to spend as much time doing fun things with my family as I had been accustomed. They didn't understand why they had to keep the noise level down when mommy was studying for a big exam. But, all in all, everything worked out and I would go back and do it all over again. Since your kids are older, they probably have their own social life which would allow you the time to study and aren't quite as dependant on you as young children are.

    Something else I found interesting was that as an adult student, I actually loved classes that I hated in high school, like Anatomy & Physiology. Kinda like how you like certain foods as an adult that you hated as a kid, LOL. I'd made pretty good grades in high school, but made even better ones and enjoyed studying while in nursing school. Maybe it was the maturity and maybe because as a teenager, it got in the way of my busy social life. I was told by some instructors that they've found adult students do actually do better...as a whole. (This is not to discourage younger students, nor give them the idea I'm meaning all younger students.)

    There are tons of nurses who become nurses as "older" adults. If you are interested in nursing, I say GO FOR IT.
  11. by   SCRN1
    Thanks. Even though it has it's ups & downs (as MOST kinds of jobs do), I really do enjoy nursing and wish I'd started right out of high school. I wanted then to either be a nurse or a teacher, but my guidance counselor talked me out of it and to go to college to become a CPA instead. I tried, but while in college that go-round, I was miserable. When I later decided to go back to school, I decided to go into what I wanted to do and have had no regrets since.
    Quote from TexasPoodleMix
    Great post, SCRN! How are you liking nursing as a profession ?
  12. by   Annabelle57
    I can speak from a student's point of view...

    I'm on the younger end of "adult student" - I've only been out of school and in the working world now for a little over 6 years, but that time has made a world of difference in my studies. I'm much more disciplined and responsible - I used to be the kid who would wait until the very, very last minute to do ANYTHING, and now, I'm more apt to be overly-prepared for tests, quizzes, projects, etc. I'm with SCRN: I used to hate any science class, precisely because I always performed so poorly (see aforementioned study habits) and made such crappy grades, and now, much to my surprise, I *love* my microbiology class and have a high A average (I'm actually a TUTOR!).

    It's been said before: if you want to be a nurse badly enough, you will be. Sometimes the route that gets you there is different than you expected, but it still reaches the same destination. Go for it! :hatparty:

    As for the ADN vs BSN... well, take it for what it's worth from a student, but if you can do the BSN, I would go for that over the ADN. A lot of times, the time difference in completing the degrees is minimal, and if you find a good program at a state school (vs a private, more expensive school), the cost won't vary that much either. Plus, I hear ADN waiting list times are ridiculously long, but I guess that depends on the school. As far as quality of care and nursing between the two - that depends on the individual, not the degree! Pay is the same, although sometimes employers will give a *small* difference for BSN (maybe $.50/hr more) - again, depends on the location. A BSN just opens more doors: graduate degrees, leadership/management opportunities, etc.

    Good luck!
  13. by   NA NA
    Hi Tweety, thanks for responding. What exactly do you have to do to get excepted into the nursing program. I've only applied for financial aid and submitted applications at a few colleges. I'm really trying. I haven't been in school for years, so I know I will have to be tested? What is the procedures?
    Last edit by NA NA on Jun 19, '04

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