inverview question how would you answer?

  1. Hello I would like to ask all of you a few questions. I completed a two year RN school last week and did quit well, but I plan to continue to get my BS and even my Masters. Personality wise, I am bit shy and introverted. About the only question I do not look forward too and hope I do not get asked is, "Tell me about your self". So for you Managers who performs interview; what would the interviewer look for in an answer, how would you answer? thank you inadvance
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Duckyaryj
    Talk about your strengths...what you have achieved over the past years clinical wise, and in class. dont mention your shyness or weaknesses. (if that question is asked give the "I can never learn enough" answer).

    This is what my clinical instructor told me to say on interviews
  4. by   fronkey bean
    Quote from rn660r
    Hello I would like to ask all of you a few questions. I completed a two year RN school last week and did quit well, but I plan to continue to get my BS and even my Masters. Personality wise, I am bit shy and introverted. About the only question I do not look forward too and hope I do not get asked is, "Tell me about your self". So for you Managers who performs interview; what would the interviewer look for in an answer, how would you answer? thank you inadvance
    The key is to look confident, look them in the eye (practice w/ friends if you need to) and talk about the things that are important to you, your professional interests, your goals, etc. Sell yourself, make them believe you are special (b/c you are)! Good luck!
  5. by   AprilRNhere
    Ditto...tell your strong points. Are you detail oriented,organized, good time management skills, empathetic, hypervigilent about healthcare, health promotion...etc...

    If specifically asked about weaknesses....use the obvious...your inexperience at nursing. They already know it...and it's definately improvable.

    Mock confidence....you have the education....you WILL be a good nurse...go in and show them that.

    Good luck!
  6. by   flashpoint
    When I ask the "Tell me about yourself" question, I like to hear about the person...not their education, not their work experience, not awards they have earned. It is a good time to talk about things like hobbies, families, future plans and things that don't really impact the job, but let them know that you are a well rounded person with a life outside of the work place. A lot of the things like being organized, strong points and weak points, and things like that should pop up later in the interview.

    I wouldn't mention anything that could be controverisal...this is not the time to tell them that you are trying to learn how to make voodoo dolls or that you are on a committee that is trying to close all of the bars in town or that you would like to see LPNs abolished and go to RNs only. And yes...I've actually been told all three things...not a good plan when your staff development nurse is a preacher's wife, when your DON's husband owns one of the bars in town, or when two of the people on the interview committee are LPNs.

    Oh...a few more things...don't tell them you are a vegetarian and that you wouldl like to encourage all of the residents to give up meat if you live in 'cattle country' and the corproation who owns the facility owns a bunch of cattle ranches. Don't belch, fart, or pick your nose. And don't call one of your former DONs a bad name...she may be the DON you are interviewing with five years later after losing 120 pounds, dyeing her har, having a nose job, and getting married.

    Last edit by sirI on Dec 19, '07 : Reason: TOS
  7. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from duckyaryj
    ...(if that question ["what are your weaknesses?"] is asked give the "i can never learn enough" answer).
    this is always a matter of debate and i strongly advise against responding with such banal answers. remember that the person asking the question is doing so for a reason and has asked it a lot. they know all of the "make me look good" answers like, "i work too hard" or "i can't learn enough."

    they're not looking for a particular answer, they're trying to see how you think and to assess your introspection and self-objectiveness.

    i've interviewed numerous people for various positions, both singly and as part of a panel, and i can guarantee you that i've not seen one person hired who's given a pat answer to a sincere question.

    if asked a question about a weakness, respond with something that you think is a legitimate deficit for you (we all have 'em, don't pretend that you're perfect) and then discuss how you actively work to improve in that area.
  8. by   Daytonite
    well, first off, i probably wouldn't ask that question. i ask more directed questions. with this kind of question i never know what i'm liable to get back from the person. they could start talking about strawberry farming and as interesting as that might be, it's really not what we are there to talk about. however, when i interview i am interested in a person's character. this is a list of characteristics that i am looking for:
    • positive attitude
    • motivation
    • initiative
    • dynamic energy
    • responsibility
    • ability to give good customer service
    • capacity to learn
    • productivity
    • flexibility
    • leadership
    • team work
    • ability to tolerate pressure
    • analytical ability
    • desire to develop professionally
    now, if you can develop an answer that incorporates one or more of these attributes and how in a clever way, all the better for you.
  9. by   JaneyW
    For the OP. Please don't take this the wrong way. I am not trying to flame you but am trying to be helpful. I am in an MSN program and this is a huge pet peeve of mine. If you are planning on pursuing higher education in English, please spend some time working on your spelling and grammar skills. If this means taking a course or buying a workbook from a teacher supply store please take the initiative to do just that. I fully realize that this is just a message board, and, again, I am not trying to be mean. However, if I were in the position to hire you and received writing like your post I might wonder if you were just not a very careful person or maybe you didn't understand the reality involved in furthering your education.

    Please take this post in the spirit it was intended and good luck to you. Working on my MSN has been a real adventure and has broadened my view of nursing.
  10. by   llg
    As someone who has conducted many, many interviews in my life, I STRONGLY agree with those who say to avoid anything that sounds like a "pat," "standard," or "rehearsed" answer. Make it personal so that you stand out from the other applicants. If you feel you NEED to mention things on your resume because it appears they haven't read it, point out the poisitive highlights briefly. Then go on to more personal things -- such as your reasons for wanting the job, what you hope to do in your career long term, etc. Sprinle a few details about your personal life (non-controversial ones) and smile, appear confident, etc.
  11. by   NurseCherlove
    Quote from cotjockey
    When I ask the "Tell me about yourself" question, I like to hear about the person...not their education, not their work experience, not awards they have earned. It is a good time to talk about things like hobbies, families, future plans and things that don't really impact the job, but let them know that you are a well rounded person with a life outside of the work place. A lot of the things like being organized, strong points and weak points, and things like that should pop up later in the interview.

    While I have never been an interviewer (well not a primary interviewer anyway), I was actually thinking the same thing, but wasn't sure if it was the right thing to say. That is, until I saw this post.

    With a question that broad, you might start with something like, "I'm a mother of 2 boys and I'm married to my high school sweetheart. I've recently started learning how to play piano - I find it's an excellent stress reliever. My first degree is in X, and while I loved X for X reasons, I still needed something more - and that something more is nursing in X arena." You then of course can segue into your reasons for wanting this particular position. You get the picture.

    Good luck!
  12. by   Dental Hygienist
    Well, I don't know if it's good or bad, but I just try and be cautiously honest and answer the irritating questions honestly and throw in a little humor where appropriate...I know that is redundant advice, but I think that if I was an interviewer I'd get sick of all the canned responses; but the person who gave an honest answer and made us all chuckle; that candidate would stick out in my mind.

    The weakness question; this is what I've been know to say:

    "oh boy...I knew THIS question was coming [chuckle] well, like all people I do have some weaknesses. I need to develop a thicker skin when being coached, I need to learn not to take professional critcism personally. These are things that I've been working on as I grow professionally, but I'm not perfect just yet [chuckle]"

    The tell me about yourself question:

    "I'm married to my wonderful husband ______ and we live on a small farm in ________; but I don't really have a green thumb, so that is interesting. [chuckle] We like to camp in the summer and go snowboarding in the winter. I like working out at the gym before work to keep my energy up for the day. I'm a vegetarian and kind of a health nut, but I don't like to cook, so that's interesting too! [chuckle] I'd be lying if I told you that being a dental hygienist was my life's dream and my life's passion; but I am very good at what I do and I do enjoy it most of the time; and the rest of the time you'd never know the difference! [chuckle]"

    You do have to find your own style and selectively devulge information. For me rehearsing is just too over the top; but I do decide ahead of time which parts of my life they will and will not be hearing about. For instance, they don't need to know about my back problems or that I want to have kids in the next couple of years. I tend to interview well; so it must be working out OK!
  13. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from NurseCherlove
    ... you might start with something like, "I'm a mother of 2 boys and I'm married to ...
    You should stay away from saying things that would be answers to illegal questions. They are not allowed to ask about marital or paternal status and you should not divulge it (though you're allowed to). It puts the interviewer in a bit of an awkward position if they're aware of federal law.
  14. by   EricJRN
    I agree with you on the weakness question, Hygienist. Trying to outfox the interviewer is never the way to go. Naming a specific weakness and how you're addressing it - that's the best way to go.

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