Inappropriate CNA behavior? - page 7

Hi, so I just had my first clinical this past Saturday, and the CNA that my partner and I were shadowing had some unsettling behaviors... I've read a few posts that were similar to this one, and a... Read More

  1. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from Timbal
    You did good! I'm loosing my patients with the other posters stating you should essentially ignore the situation. I feel like you are going to be a caring, good provider. It is not easy to go in on day one and have to deal with this kind of situation. You did the appropriate thing by informing your instructor.
    Thank you lol, I didn't ignore the situation. I literally reported it as soon as I could. My partner did nothing, and I wonder if half the people on here saying "I would've confronted right then and there" would've actually done so. Not to mention, we all handle situations differently. I didn't start drama or make tension with a person I knew nothing about within 5 minutes. I also think, that if I had gotten into a "tiff" with my CNA and it was brought up to the instructor, she would've told me to talk to her about it so she could speak to the CNA, and I think that if I had posted that on here then people would be agreeing with her. And I told her that I wanted her input as to how to handle the situation and just her input overall. It's easy to go "*GASP!* I would've handled it this way *puts hand on hip and checks nails, goes back to reading comments on the internet*"

    (not to put down anyone who commented with good intentions, but seriously? glad to know you're a saint, but I've still got some learning to do)
  2. by   quazar
    I think you handled it as well as could be expected. Had I been confronted with this as a student on my first day of clinical, I have no idea if I would have had the stones to speak up. Sad but true. It has taken me years to grow the cajones and backbone that I have now. You are on your way to a good start.
  3. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Timbal
    You did good! I'm loosing my patients with the other posters stating you should essentially ignore the situation. I feel like you are going to be a caring, good provider. It is not easy to go in on day one and have to deal with this kind of situation. You did the appropriate thing by informing your instructor.
    I think you meant you are losing your patience.
  4. by   Kooky Korky
    So, OP - did you tell your Instructor on Saturday? What came of it? Where do things stand? Did you find out why people tell the
    patient to go in his briefs?
  5. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    So, OP - did you tell your Instructor on Saturday? What came of it? Where do things stand? Did you find out why people tell the
    patient to go in his briefs?
    I don't know how you'll feel about this, but when I talked to my instructor, she seemed genuinely concerned, she really wanted to hear what I had to say and she took out pen and paper and noted it down, but at the same time she also told me that she thought that the way I saw it might've been because I was new and that was my first clinical. She did come and check up on my CNA a lot. I saw her sitting in the hall with the residents, making talk as she tried to watch my CNA. I don't know if she had a talk with her, but her personality did a 180. My last clinical she was like a different person. She was gently nudging patients awake and using "affection", saying things like "are you okay? Here, I'll turn the light on the lowest setting for you..." etc. She was completely kind to the residents this time, and they in turn were more talkative with her.

    I know what I saw wasn't in my head, though. Not just the "actual" incidents, but my partner showed great disdain with our CNA, too, and told me she thought she was rude and liked the other CNA who was helping out more. A resident also told her to change her tone of voice when speaking to him, and then after my CNA bumped into another CNA (who was covering her break and mentoring us), she asked "I don't know what her problem is, if she's in a bad mood or what." It definitely wasn't in my head, other people saw it, too, but as of right now it seems she's changed, though I'll of course continue to watch.
  6. by   Macropsia
    I had a similar experience many moons ago and reported it to my instructor and was upset that I wasn't learning proper ways due to the inappropriate behavior of person I was shadowing. I was told that indeed I WAS learning... what NOT to do. True but I felt it should have been addressed. I realized it was better not to for the school-facility relationship in the big picture... It's difficult to find places to host students for clinicals and the schools are at their mercy in a sense to accomplish getting those clinical hours in. So try to lead by example and offer to assist the resident yourself if it is a task you are allowed to do.
  7. by   Bobbipoo
    WOW!!! Always think of it this way...would you want your mother, father, grandmother, or grandfather to be spoken to that way or treated that way??? If the answer is NO, then it probably isn't right for any other resident. And truly should be reported to the abuse coordinator and investigated. I'm sure both of those girls have bowel movements that smell like roses...not! It hurts my heart to hear of residents being done this way! And so what if they are grouchy!! We would be too if someone took us out of our home and put us in some unfamiliar place with people that don't even care about us. Took all our freedom away for some little brats to be rude and unappreciative of our lives. Oh this makes me angry!!!
    If you feel it's not right in your heart and wouldn't want your family member being done that way then you can bet your bottom dollar it's probably not right!!!
  8. by   bathrobemom
    I've met CNAs like that, they do exist unfortunately. They either leave or get fired. You talked to your instructor about it already, which was the right thing to do. What you described is verbal and emotional abuse.
    I don't know what else you can do right now. If I was the instructor I would investigate and that would take a little time. I wouldn't instantly fire someone because another CNA told me what you described. She will probably try to discreetly observe the CNA and talk to the residents. Your instructor might already be aware and might be in the process of trying to hire someone to replace her. This could take some time, not a lot of people apply to be CNAs.
    You can encourage residents to talk to the instructor if they have complaints. You might have to reassure them that what they say will be confidential and they won't face retaliation.
    I would wait a week and see what happens. Only if you continue to notice further inappropriate behaviors then I would ask to speak with the instructor to follow up on your concern. I doubt it, but that CNA could've just been having a bad day. Think carefully about what you want to say first so you sound like you're advocating for your residents and not tattling on a coworker.
  9. by   Alexandra1998
    WOW!!!! I have been a nurse for over 30 years and can't tell you how often I have seen this behaviour. Yes management is aware of this. But because of short staffing they are NOT going to do anything about it. It needs to be brought their attention often. You do the right thing always. In everything you do. At the end of the day, uou need to be able to think you did what you could to make someone's day better. Can you imagine being the patient and seeing that this CNA is yours all day? Thank God I am not a family member overhearthis CNA...you just be you, God bless.
  10. by   Thirtybird0623
    If what you are saying is exactly what happened, it's an issue, should be reported and investigated. Period.
  11. by   maggieellis
    Honestly, it's hard to find good CNAs because they're not paid well--particularly in nursing homes-- and this is the result. When I worked as a CNA in a nursing home, there was a coworker who was caught *kissing* one of the residents! On the mouth! Did he get fired? No! Because he showed up and did a "good job" -- other than the fact that he had a habit of molesting elderly people. One resident in particular used to sun-down really badly: she'd basically scream for hours every evening. My coworker would shut himself in her room with her and she'd go miraculously silent. What the heck was going on in there?? No one asked, because everyone was just relieved this poor woman wasn't screaming--and they felt like they couldn't fire anyone because they were minimally staffed as it was. (I think of this often and wish I'd reported the situation to someone... but I was young and dumb. )

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Inappropriate CNA behavior?