imposter nurse???? - page 2

hi. we had a nurse hired to our unit and oriented for about a month. she had told management that she had worked med surg at a major county hospital prior to moving to here. during orientation... Read More

  1. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from jnette
    WOW, Mattsmom !!!

    What a mess ! Had no idea it could involve all this ! Shew !
    Yup I sure learned my lesson ..LOL...sorry my post was kinda off topic but this thread reminded me of the current paranoia out there with increased identity theft.
  2. by   nesher
    In Washington state, a license can be checked on line - never need to drag it around any more.
    We haven't had any imposter RN's but we did have a fake doc once. This guy walked around, white coat, scrubs, stethscope - would would show up for codes - did CPR etc - never hurt anyone... took awhile to figure it out, but he did get caught. It pays to ask someone who they are is one of the lessons learned from that - plus to check name badges!
  3. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from nesher
    In Washington state, a license can be checked on line - never need to drag it around any more.
    Yes! The board keeps a picture of us on file too which is a great idea...Texas never wanted a pic so it made it easier for identity thieves.
  4. by   tommycher
    I am in Texas, and the BON has a picture of me and all of the other nurses I graduated with on file. The school sent them to the board before we could sit for the NCLEX, then when we took the NCLEX, they took a picture there that they could verify with the one sent by the school. I am sure it is standard procedure, required by the BON. However, there is no picture on the license.
  5. by   SophieMae
    Quote from tommycher
    I am in Texas, and the BON has a picture of me and all of the other nurses I graduated with on file. The school sent them to the board before we could sit for the NCLEX, then when we took the NCLEX, they took a picture there that they could verify with the one sent by the school. I am sure it is standard procedure, required by the BON. However, there is no picture on the license.

    Photos on the license, a great idea. If not the next best thing is the "chip".....no thanks, I dont want to be scanned like a can of peas!!!!!
  6. by   Salty1
    Quote from lllliv
    hi. we had a nurse hired to our unit and oriented for about a month. she had told management that she had worked med surg at a major county hospital prior to moving to here.

    during orientation she proved to have no clue about anything. she did not know how to flush an iv(flush already prepared in a syringe--she just looked at it like she had never seen one before and asked what to do.when told she refused.).. didn't understand how to d/c a foley even after the syringe was handed to her and she was looking right at it. basically she could do nothing fo a pt. without asking her preceptor what to do. makes me wonder if she really passed boards. when questioned why she didn't know these things she changed her story. stated she worked in a clinic. then when someone said "i thought you did med surg?" , she claimed she did both.

    she was scheduled to go off orientation this week(she had already been given extra days). she didn't show up. the charge nurse called and it was really weird. first, someone answered the phone, charge asked for nurse by name, passed to another person, asked again---went on for four people before she got to speak to this nurse. then this nurse stated she was sick.

    next day---no show. charge called her home. someone answered-- "oh you want ______," click---hung up. called back. someone answered. "oh, she went out." this was within one minute.

    called back within 20minutes--answering machine.message left."just let us know if you will be here tomorrow or if you will be off sick again."

    she calls back later in afternoon----"i am sick and cannot work."

    ok "so, you are calling in sick for tomorrow???"


    she replies. "i cannot come back to work anymore."



    i'm thinking of calling the boards and ask them to investigate. what say you???
    I do not doubt for one minute that this person is a bogus Nurse. The real question is why was she in a medical facility? Any drugs missing? Any syringes missing? Any babies missing (God forbid) ? Certainly, the BON should be notified. I expect Administration has already done so unless, of course, they are engaged in a CYA maneuver because of their failure to require credentials prior to hiring someone. I recall an episode some 15 years ago wherein a supposedly experienced "Nurse" was transferred from med/surg to ICU and during orientation received an order for 40 of KCL IV. Fortunately, she asked me if that was to be given IV push or added to a liter of IV fluid. I thanked her for asking and then spoke with administration questioning her experience and my feeling that she constitued a danger in the ICU milieu. At that point I learned that she was supposed to present her license the following day in the Nursing Office. Reporting to work the next day she was challenged to present her license and claimed that her wallet, containing her license, had been stolen after work. A call to the BON at that point revealed "no such person".

    Salty
  7. by   renerian
    Supervisors will do that most likely with board help.

    renerian
  8. by   TennNurse
    [QUOTE=Blackcat99] When I was a CNA many many years ago, I had to train a new RN in many basic nursing skills such as giving an enema etc. QUOTE]

    I agree, the OP's co-worker definitely sounds fishy. But I have to make a confession here, y'all. Though I graduated from nursing school in 2001, I only recently performed my 2nd enema. By the grace of God, the need simply never arose during my nursing clinicals, and throughout my travels in OB-GYN (office) nursing, telemetry, and ER, I have been in the right place at the right time only twice. Same for inserting Foleys in males. In school, I never had a male pt who needed one at the time I was there, and certainly in OB-GYN I had numerous females but no men. So now I've done a couple, but people I work with are always amazed that such "basic" procedures weren't plentiful during my clinicals in school. Where you choose to work definitely has an impact on the skills you pick up.

    Having said that, though, I cannot imagine a nurse who has worked in Med-Surg looking at a prefilled flush syringe, or a syringe to deflate a catheter balloon, and asking what to do with it. Under no circumstances is that plausible.
  9. by   lllliv
    thanks for the responses.

    we've had new nurses with no experience come to work on our unit, and i can understand the need for orientation. everyone on my unit are very helpful with newbies. you learn many things after you start to work but this girl had no knowledge whatsoever.

    another thing her preceptor told us---she was handed a vial of zofran and told to draw up the med for iv push through a picc. she got an insulin syringe and was going to use that. also she had no idea what a sliding scale was or how to use it.

    i haven't called anyone yet but i still think i will.

    my manager says she terminated her---even though the girl stated she wasn't coming back to work first. she is no longer eligble for rehire at my facility, or so i am told.
  10. by   weesyanne
    Quote from lllliv
    thanks for the responses.

    we've had new nurses with no experience come to work on our unit, and i can understand the need for orientation. everyone on my unit are very helpful with newbies. you learn many things after you start to work but this girl had no knowledge whatsoever.

    another thing her preceptor told us---she was handed a vial of zofran and told to draw up the med for iv push through a picc. she got an insulin syringe and was going to use that. also she had no idea what a sliding scale was or how to use it.

    i haven't called anyone yet but i still think i will.

    my manager says she terminated her---even though the girl stated she wasn't coming back to work first. she is no longer eligble for rehire at my facility, or so i am told.
    I have seen nurses over the years from a very prestigious nursing program nearby who did not know how to open a syringe because they had not done it in clinicals. I think that they got cheated by their instructors somehow, especially since that nursing school costs $30,000 a year to attend. One fairly recent grad told me that she had given one injection during her 4 years in school, and was told that she could learn that "on the job" once she got out of school. So this "nurse" could have been from that type of program or she could have very well been an imposter (which I'm guessing she was).
    I can also remember years ago, a nurse that graduated from a local program tried to start an IV with a regular needle AND she gave IV potassium directly to a patient without diluting. My friend was in charge on that unit and could hear the lady screaming all the way down the hall! Lucky the patient's potassium level was only 2 point something when this happened.
  11. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from tommycher
    I am in Texas, and the BON has a picture of me and all of the other nurses I graduated with on file. The school sent them to the board before we could sit for the NCLEX, then when we took the NCLEX, they took a picture there that they could verify with the one sent by the school. I am sure it is standard procedure, required by the BON. However, there is no picture on the license.
    Must be for new grads...my license in Tx was by endorsement in 1981...they have never asked ME for a picture, but I hear now they want fingerprints too both of which are probably good ideas today.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Feb 19, '05
  12. by   zambezi
    When I took the boards two years ago, I had to bring a picture (passport size/requirements) and my drivers license to my NCLEX testing site, the two were compared and I had to give all ten fingerprints...One thing that I like about the licenses that my state give out is that they are like a credit card/drivers license...not paper....so I could probably wash it and it would be okay...It also has the holograms on it to make it harder to copy...I'm glad I don't have to worry about wrinking or tearing it...they also have a bar code on them but I don't know what for- I have never seen it used...

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