"I'm too young for a living will" - page 4

by somenurse

3,913 Views | 34 Comments

(this is copied as it was becoming a derail on the "Slow Code" thread). Some ppl think a living will = self DNR order. Many ppl seem to think of living wills as something old ppl should do, but young ppl don't need one. ... Read More


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    As a 25 year old diagnosed with a brain tumor a year ago last week at the ripe age of 24 I realized there were quite a few things I'd never thought of...like short term disability for instance . Obviously I didn't have a living will at the time of diagnosis either but between the diagnosis and the major 10 hour brain surgery a week later I did put together some advanced directives and get them notarized. Working in an ICU there are just too many scenarios I have seen and never want happen to me to risk it. My dad actually suggested I do it, I was hesitant but then realized it was probably a good idea. Thankfully my surgery went fine but you just never know.
    somenurse likes this.
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    I really didn't read most posts, but had to mention...

    If anyone really says they're too young; ask them if they wear a seatbelt, use a fourwheeler, or ride a motorbike.

    Just saying... 5 years in surgery; all my trauma activations were due to one of those... not saying it doesn't happen, but of those trauma surgery pts, never saw seatbelt marks.
    somenurse likes this.
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    While you're doing the papers with a lawyer, finish the process with your final will (not just the 'living will'/adv dir/MPOA). You can change it if cicrcumstances change for you later. And for some, you should consider a life insurance policy to help pay for some left over bills and/or funeral expenses. (Sheesh - I sound like that TV commercial!)

    Had all my paperwork done some 15 years ago after my Mom went critical - without her documentation. She did recover and then subsequently had it all taken care of, along with that of my Dad who could not make the DNR decision by himself at the time she was so sick.

    There's no Mr. amoLucia or any little amos in my life; both my parents have passed away. I just want it quick and easy for my sisters to proceed re my end-of-life wishes and to have access to all my vast worldly possessions. I don't want any long-lost faux relative to contest anything.

    As experienced nurses, I believe we have all seen way too many tragic horror stories. Some of us, personally, have been only an eyelash away from being one of those stories. Life IS too short; OnlybyHisgrace said it very well.
    somenurse likes this.
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    Here's a twist: when I filled out my POLST (physician's orders for life-sustaining treatment) form at the age of 50, my doctor told me I was 'too young'!! Especially because I'd chosen to be a DNR. I looked at him and said "Look, we've both been in codes and we both know how all that works. I don't want that for myself. If I've still got a pulse, sure, go for it....but if I'm dead, for God's sake LEAVE me that way." He signed the order.
    somenurse likes this.
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    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    Here's a twist: when I filled out my POLST (physician's orders for life-sustaining treatment) form at the age of 50, my doctor told me I was 'too young'!! Especially because I'd chosen to be a DNR. I looked at him and said "Look, we've both been in codes and we both know how all that works. I don't want that for myself. If I've still got a pulse, sure, go for it....but if I'm dead, for God's sake LEAVE me that way." He signed the order.

    Good on you, Viva, for getting YOUR wishes on paper, this will help someone else someday, further on down the road. I kind of almost see doing our own living wills, as an act of kindness, helping out someone ELSE who will be faced with tough choices know what we'd want done.

    It's always an option to have the DNR be conditional,

    such as "I'm a DNR if i am terminally ill/end stage disease process"
    or,
    "I'm a DNR if i am certifiably brain dead."

    etc. Probably many docs would balk at a wide-open, general DNR on a young person, but, a conditional DNR is something we can stipulate even decades before the criteria IS met, even when we are very young, we can have it written, and our medical POA be told, "I'm a DNR if i am _____" (whatever criteria each individual wants put in there.)
    VivaLasViejas likes this.


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