"I'm too young for a living will" - page 3

(this is copied as it was becoming a derail on the "Slow Code" thread). Some ppl think a living will = self DNR order. Many ppl seem to think of living wills as something old ppl should do, but young ppl don't need one. ... Read More

  1. 1
    How can anyone working in nursing think s/he is too young for this? laughable.
    somenurse likes this.

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  2. 1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    How To Create a Living Will | Legal Wills

    ^good info on that site, with tips and pointers.
    Thank you so much! I havent had time to look it over since last night but i plan to today. Thank you for taking the time to do this! Very kind of you!
    somenurse likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    In my state you just choose whether or not you want to be an organ donor when you get your driver's license. Is it not like that everywhere? The back of my license has a blurb about being an organ donor that I've not paid attention to, but I know there's a little heart "icon" on the top of my photo which means I told them at the DMV when asked that I wanted to be an organ donor.

    Not that I'm wishing more work on nurses, but it would be kind of nice if there was a fill in the blank type of living will that was an automatic process for being admitted into the hospital rather than just asking, do you have one?

    yes, it is the same in most states i have lived in. I only mentioned one could be an organ donor, and later, ALSO donate entire body to science, as some ppl don't know this, thinking, if some organs have been removed, that the org would no longer accept the dead body, but, that is false.

    Most hospitals i've worked in, can also accept a patient as an organ donor, whose family say okay, even if the license doesn't specify it. I've sat in on many many of these conversations about organ donation, when patient is brain dead on a vent in ICU and termination of the vent is being planned. (often a family mtg with doc and nurse) and the myths surrounding organ donation are rampant. Everyone be sure to tell your family you DO want to be an organ donor. That always always helps, when one relative or close pals states, "Yes, i did hear John say he'd want to be an organ donor." Helps family make decision if they have heard it from the patient at some point.

    Science orgs and medical schools will take dead bodies which have been formally embalmed, or not, or bodies which have had organs harvested, or not. Almost all diseases are accepted, too, with a very very few exceptions.
    I see donating my body as a rational thing to do, if it helps some med student, plus, the free cremation is plus, imo. For $3,000 to $5,000 dollars (2012 prices, but, varies from state to state) my family could go have a good time instead. Makes more sense, imo.
  4. 0
    Quote from Orange Tree
    You are torturing some readers (me) by using "ppl" so much (or at all). Otherwise, your message is a good one.

    such a great point to add. Having a brilliant but dyslexic person in my family, i long ago got over being pedantic about deciphering messages, took me a while, but, i did. So long as i 'get it', i'm good. I guess i just don't stress out about it now.

    sorry, it's habit whenever i type now, from texting to pals whose phones only accept so many characters per msg. But, i'm working on it, okay? I also have to work on not posting LOL, too, keep doing that by accident, too. (hangs head)


    so many abbreviations on most pages....

    Me, as an older nurse, sometimes i find the medical abbreviations sometimes odd, these acronyms and nicknames vary sometimes from state to state,
    and from decade to decade,
    and every once in while, i have to google or guess what these initials, or those initials, mean. To me, so long as the person posting can be understood, it's helpful. but, i'll try harder.
    Last edit by somenurse on Dec 8, '12
  5. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    In my state you just choose whether or not you want to be an organ donor when you get your driver's license. Is it not like that everywhere? The back of my license has a blurb about being an organ donor that I've not paid attention to, but I know there's a little heart "icon" on the top of my photo which means I told them at the DMV when asked that I wanted to be an organ donor.

    Not that I'm wishing more work on nurses, but it would be kind of nice if there was a fill in the blank type of living will that was an automatic process for being admitted into the hospital rather than just asking, do you have one?

    Asking if a person has a living will, is now a normal part of admissions to the hospitals i've worked in. If the person says "No", that automatically triggers an offer to have some dept come by and help person fill one in. I've forgotten now, what dept did that. Maybe social services, but, i'm not sure.

    still, a lot of peole don't take up the offer,
    cuz
    they think a living will equates to "do not resuscitate.".


    *sigh*

    Obamacare's offer to pay for/cover everyone to have that doctor office visit, specifically to learn about what a living will IS,
    was what falsely labelled as "death panels"....this only added to some ppl's false perception that a living will IS a 'DNR' order...(the bulk of someone's medical bills often happen AFTER a code, wowza, ka-CHING!!, and/or in final year or two of a terminal illness..so the cost would having insurance companies cover people all having a doctor visit specifically for finding out about what they want in THEIR own personalized, individual, living will, would have paid for itself, as, no doubt, some would have opted "no code if i am terminally ill, or brain dead" and "no tube feeds if i am brain dead" etc.)
    Last edit by somenurse on Dec 8, '12
  6. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    When I was doing C&L psych at a large urban teaching hospital quite a few years ago, I saw the hospital honor advanced directives and POAs that were handwritten on notebook paper -- as long as it was in ink (not pencil), and signed and witnessed, that was good enough. The hospital's position (although I'm sure this is not universal ) was that you didn't have to pay an attorney to draw something official up; as long as the hospital could determine clearly what your wishes were, and that they were really your wishes, that was good enough.

    It is interesting how much variety there is in what is accepted, from one hospital to another, and from one state to another.
    This also varies occasionally, from one doc to another, too. I can't recall ever seeing a doc order 'DNR' when the nurses were like, "No way, that pt is so viable!!"
    but, i can recall this one doc we had, who almost never ever would write a DNR order, no matter what. That was about 15 years ago, he was kinda different.

    but, yes yes yes, everyone should at the least, tell their family their wishes, but, a written living will is better,
    and a medical power of attorney is even better, imo. I've seen brain dead, or terminally ill ppl "living" on vents, tube fed, who probably never ever would have chosen that.
  7. 2
    Wrote my living well at 21 but haven't gotten it legalized yet. I need to get started on that, life is too short. Lord knows I don't wanna be trached, peg, and left on a vent.
    amoLucia and somenurse like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from OnlybyHisgraceRN
    Wrote my living well at 21 but haven't gotten it legalized yet. I need to get started on that, life is too short. Lord knows I don't wanna be trached, peg, and left on a vent.
    GOOD ON YOU!!


    I'm not sure if the links in reply #13 and reply #15 are accurate, but, if they are, then apparently, in some states, just signing it in front of 2 other people is all that's required. But, so worth checking on to be sure!!
  9. 1
    This is an excellent topic. I've actually had a living will since I was 22 (I'm 27 now). I was taking a medical ethics course, and I came to a personal realization that it was necessary after reading several case studies.
    somenurse likes this.
  10. 2
    You are never too young to have a MPOA and a living will. Those nurses who think they are too young need to go work Trauma for a while. A real eye opener for sure. My husband and I discussed on more than one occasion about what he wanted done as he got sicker and if he was no longer a transplant candidate. It was to take him home. We had an advance directive in place. It amazes me that in the light of a terminal illness and an advance directive how much the medical establishment will still try to push dialysis, intubation, pressors etc. on families. I was at home when the doctor told my husband he was unlisted. When I got back to the hospital I requested to see the resident. I insisted that she make him DNR/DNI at that point. She said "well we have to discuss it" I told her no discussion was necessary and to write the order. She hemmed and hawed and I finally told her that if I went to get something to eat and I came back and they were coding him, there would be hell to pay. It got written. The nephrology resident came in to discuss dialysis. I asked the resident if it came with a liver and she said no. I sent her packing. Then she had the fellow come in and once again I had to shut him down too. He needed dialysis 3 days prior! So why then? What part of DNR/DNI didn't they get?? It's all about the money honey! We had insurance and this was a University hospital (that's another story) I shudder to think if one of his kids or his mom was his MPOA. Long story short you certainly need a MPOA that will hold their ground as far as what you want done.

    I think it is a sign of maturity that younger people think about these issues and plan before having their families thrown into the medical maelstrom.
    somenurse and amoLucia like this.


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