I'm Quitting nursing to work in coffee shop

  1. It's decided. Nursing chewed me up and spit me out. In the short 4 year period I've been in healthcare, I'm just fed up with everything. My plan B is opening a coffee shop. So the plan is go work at a coffee shop and get experience in the industry while my husband and I save to open our own.

    Im wondering if any of you have done anything similar only to come back to nursing.
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from remotefuse
    It's decided. Nursing chewed me up and spit me out. In the short 4 year period I've been in healthcare, I'm just fed up with everything. My plan B is opening a coffee shop. So the plan is go work at a coffee shop and get experience in the industry while my husband and I save to open our own.

    Im wondering if any of you have done anything similar only to come back to nursing.
    The coffee market seems way over-saturated, to me ...a setting sun. I also perceive people who sit around in coffee shops as selfie-taking types. I would not be able to cope, but I do wish you luck!
  4. by   Flatline
    To be honest, it does not seem like you are fed up with nursing and quitting the profession...you are looking for an excuse to scratch your entrepreneurial itch.

    Good luck with your future endeavors, many nurses make excellent entrepreneurs.

    Out of curiosity, have you considered a franchise? Many (most if not all) send their new franchise owners through training programs that not only includes the basics but also business ownership training. You would be surprised at how little some franchises cost, hell of a lot less than starting a business from scratch that is for sure.
  5. by   Kristenlaurenw
    It's going to be hard to save money on a barista salary when you are used to nursing pay. Good luck!
  6. by   MJB2010
    Actually one of the most fun jobs I hve ever had was a barista at a mall chain many years ago. They went out of business, but I worked there in high school and summers during college. I enjoyed having regular customers, and I enjoyed making specialty drinks. It was very cozy. I made about 30$ a day in the tip jar alone, so not bad money either.
  7. by   remotefuse
    .....
  8. by   remotefuse
    Quote from Kristenlaurenw
    It's going to be hard to save money on a barista salary when you are used to nursing pay. Good luck!
    My husband will continue with his 6 figure job
  9. by   RNperdiem
    Talk to some self-employed people too. My parents were self-employed and work was way more than a 40 hour week sometimes. If you accept that you might work harder and longer than you did in nursing, and not see any profit for a long time, then consider your own business.
  10. by   NurseSpeedy
    Quote from RNperdiem
    Talk to some self-employed people too. My parents were self-employed and work was way more than a 40 hour week sometimes. If you accept that you might work harder and longer than you did in nursing, and not see any profit for a long time, then consider your own business.
    Some shows easily found on Hulu like restaurant impossible, kitchen nightmares or even hotel hell can show what kind of money people put into a business without really knowing how to run it. hundreds of thousands of dollars lost and in debt.

    I would look into some formal training so that you really know what you are getting into before jumping into a huge investment. If you enjoy the barista/coffee shop idea it may be a better idea to just be an employee (Since you offered up the info that your husband makes six figures. Most families can live within their means on that kind of money. It will go fast, however, if poorly invested).

    About 20 years ago there were independently owned coffee shops on every corner of well-to-do neighborhoods. Then Starbucks moved into town and there is one on every corner. All of the independently owned ones went out of business. I did find one (which was not only a coffee shop but a full service bar and nightclub) that relocated about an hour away in a crappy area where there are no Starbucks to compete with. That area doesn't really have clientele that can spend $5 on a coffee.
  11. by   SouthernLPN2RN
    Good luck! Nursing isn't for everyone.
  12. by   remotefuse
    Quote from NurseSpeedy
    Some shows easily found on Hulu like restaurant impossible, kitchen nightmares or even hotel hell can show what kind of money people put into a business without really knowing how to run it. hundreds of thousands of dollars lost and in debt.

    I would look into some formal training so that you really know what you are getting into before jumping into a huge investment. If you enjoy the barista/coffee shop idea it may be a better idea to just be an employee (Since you offered up the info that your husband makes six figures. Most families can live within their means on that kind of money. It will go fast, however, if poorly invested).

    About 20 years ago there were independently owned coffee shops on every corner of well-to-do neighborhoods. Then Starbucks moved into town and there is one on every corner. All of the independently owned ones went out of business. I did find one (which was not only a coffee shop but a full service bar and nightclub) that relocated about an hour away in a crappy area where there are no Starbucks to compete with. That area doesn't really have clientele that can spend $5 on a coffee.
    Lots of great points and advice, thank you.

    Before nursing, this was the world I was happiest in. While I am still in the early planning phase, I did not mention all the ways my business will differ from Starbucks. Kind of the reason we also have a two year time frame and plan on doing a lot of formal training in that time.
  13. by   remotefuse
    Quote from SouthernLPN2RN
    Good luck! Nursing isn't for everyone.
    This sums it up perfectly.
  14. by   3ringnursing
    My husband was a real estate appraiser, and the way the industry went working for someone in a company became an extinct animal, so most appraisers were forced to open their own company and work solo. That meant opening an LLC, payroll, and dealing with taxes. There is no employer match when you are it.

    My husband did pretty well initially until the financial bubble on Wall Street burst, followed by the housing industry. There were so many changes that came about in it's wake that real estate appraising became a very tough business to survive in. It also became a proverbial witch hunt. Some bad appraisers were made a public example - soon all of them began to fear for their freedom given the microscope they all found themselves scrutinized by the Fed's and the FDIC. Eventually jobs became scarce, and those being offered were now only available by 3rd party endorser's to "keep things honest" and they also took a cut of the pay. Jobs began to pay less (even difficult one's) and the amount of time it took to ensure all the I's were dotted and all the T's were crossed made the pay far below minimum wage. Some companies began a policy of paying 3 months out - so you had to actually load the front end of the pipe so to speak before paying jobs began spilling out the other end. Soon appraisers were unable to make a descent living, and many were leaving the industry in droves - but that didn't mean available jobs were any more plentiful. Fanny Mae and Freddy Mac soon had a monopoly.

    My husband had been a real estate appraiser for over 20 years at this time, and well into his late 40's. I at the time was on medical disability retirement for a chronic illness and hadn't worked (nursing, or anywhere - other than staying alive) in nearly 10 years.

    We began to have to use our credit cards to live on, and we went into even more debt then we had been (and no retirement saved). Things looked very bleak ...

    We had some hard choices to make. I wasn't well by any means, but had to return to work as a nurse full time or we were screwed - good and proper.

    My husband had to return to college at almost age 50. We went into even more debt due to student loans (my income was enough that 3 people wouldn't go hungry, but we weren't living wonderful either. It also ensured my husband didn't qualify for financial aid - which only pays 70% of all schooling combined anyway - not like when I went to college, graduating in 1993. We didn't even have computers then for God's sake - this was a whole new educational system).

    My husband did a fast track COTA course while returning to restaurant work part-time, and had a very busy 23 months. The end result was he had a AD and a new career to get used to at 51 years old, and we were another $25,000.00 in debt.

    So, before you consider what is ahead of you in your possible present course of action, think about the financial cycles - there have been bubbles enough bursting all along for those in a bad enough position to witness them. Will there be another one? You betcha. Will you be in a strong enough financial position to endure it and weather the next storm? Only time will tell.

    Nursing isn't all you've experienced in the past 4 years. Think of nursing like a big diamond - there are many facets to nursing, and I bet there is one you may like - or at least one you can live with.

    I despised bedside nursing for the simple fact that every place I worked put me personally in danger, as well as the patients, with unsafe staffing ratios. Plus, it was exhausting work for someone who didn't realize they had an autoimmune illness yet. However, I returned to nursing as a telephone triage nurse and now work from home. It works for me. I didn't like nursing either before I got sick, but I can honestly say I don't dislike it any more. My present job turned out to be exactly what I needed to work full time as an RN, even with a chronic illness.

    Maybe you have the panache to open a business and do really well, but consider long time contender's in the financial business game have closed their doors forever in the tsunami of the last financial meltdown, which even now still continues to reverberate shock waves through the United States. Healthcare - particularly nursing, is one of the few careers that is built to weather the storm.

    On one hand you only live once, therefore you will never know what you can accomplish unless you try. If opening a coffee shop is your dream - really your dream, then how can I tell you not to roll the dice and give it your best shot? But if it is something you have come upon with as an alternative career choice recently then I do encourage you to proceed with caution and really consider all choices before you take the Nestea plunge (yeah, I'm showing my age again - sorry about that).

    That's our family's tale of financial woe, and it wasn't an easy story to tell by any means. I really do hope you come out on top instead, but please give your next move very careful consideration.
    Last edit by 3ringnursing on Oct 16

close