IM Injection, Hitting Bone? IM Injection, Hitting Bone? - pg.2 | allnurses

IM Injection, Hitting Bone? - page 2

So I was giving my mother an IM injection for the Flu Vaccine at the hospital, I did the injection and went the whole needle inside and felt that I hit a bone or something. I did aspirate and... Read More

  1. Visit  Mo_RN profile page
    #13 0
    In nursing school we were instructed to use 1-1 and a half inch needles IM, depending on the patient's chubbiness. But now on the floor, some nurses actually use five-eigths needles on skinny adolescents for deltoid injections. My colleagues also insert 1 and a half inch needles only half way when administering IM. I question this.
  2. Visit  GrumpyRN63 profile page
    #14 0
    Flu shots are given IM, most times you can get away with a 5/8" in the deltoid on someone who is fairly lean, and yeh I've hit bone a couple of times, just pulled back a smidge before injecting, no problems but I HATED the feeling
  3. Visit  etep1209 profile page
    #15 0
    Thanks folks for the reply...

    The problem was that I did not pull back when I hit the bone...all I did was aspirate and then inject the medication. My mother didn't twitch or anything...

    I'm scared it might have a negative effect on her...
  4. Visit  woknblues profile page
    #16 1
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    if there is limited underlying adipose tissue pull up a pinch..flu vaccines are usually given sub q
    hitting the bone can cause some site pain
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    Flu vaccines aren't given subq....or am I missing something? I've never known of a vaccine that wasn't IM.
    I believe what CHATSDALE is referring to is that if you have a very low body fat client, they also tend to be low muscle. You see this type a lot in the elderly (deltiod) or in low birthweight infants (Vastus Lateralis). The technique is to grab some muscle and draw it together, and up just a little, so that the tip of your needle is dwelling inside a "pocket of muscle" that you aggregated, rather than hitting bone.
  5. Visit  GrumpyRN63 profile page
    #17 0
    Quote from etep1209
    Thanks folks for the reply...

    The problem was that I did not pull back when I hit the bone...all I did was aspirate and then inject the medication. My mother didn't twitch or anything...

    I'm scared it might have a negative effect on her...
    Don't worry, I'm sure she'll be just fine!
  6. Visit  cherrybreeze profile page
    #18 0
    Quote from woknblues
    I believe what CHATSDALE is referring to is that if you have a very low body fat client, they also tend to be low muscle. You see this type a lot in the elderly (deltiod) or in low birthweight infants (Vastus Lateralis). The technique is to grab some muscle and draw it together, and up just a little, so that the tip of your needle is dwelling inside a "pocket of muscle" that you aggregated, rather than hitting bone.
    I understand that. What CHATSDALE said was that flu vaccines are given subq, and they are not. This doesn't explain that statement.
  7. Visit  woknblues profile page
    #19 0
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    I understand that. What CHATSDALE said was that flu vaccines are given subq, and they are not. This doesn't explain that statement.
    Hmm. Good point.
  8. Visit  ianonline profile page
    #20 0
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    Flu vaccines aren't given subq....or am I missing something? I've never known of a vaccine that wasn't IM.

    this is a pretty late response but measles vaccine is given subcutaneously.
  9. Visit  chelynn profile page
    #21 0
    Measles vaccines is in the MMR. I never knew that to be subq?
  10. Visit  ianonline profile page
    #22 0
    Quote from chelynn
    Measles vaccines is in the MMR. I never knew that to be subq?
    in my area of assignment we do not give MMR (all in one), instead we have it on a separate doses with measles vaccine administered subcutaneously.

    mumps and rubella vaccines are available only in private institutions, so you have to take your kids to some private hospital if you want your kids to be immunized.

    the vaccines that we give to babys for free are DPT, BCG, HEP B, Measles, and OPV

    DPT (IM)
    BCG (Intradermal)
    HEP B (IM)
    Measles (Subcu)
    OPV (oral drops)

    (Philippines)
  11. Visit  Spacklehead profile page
    #23 0
    Quote from ianonline
    this is a pretty late response but measles vaccine is given subcutaneously.
    Yes, as is the Varicella vaccine.
  12. Visit  chelynn profile page
    #24 0
    Ianoline thanks for clearing that up
  13. Visit  Spacklehead profile page
    #25 0
    The MMR vax is administered SQ, also, not just the measles vax (for those who administer only the measles component). I also used to run flu vax clinics - we always gave them IM.

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