Illnesses and calling in sick - page 2

I"m a little worried that I'm in trouble at work. This morning, I woke up feeling terrible. I had a very bad sore throat and was terribly nauseated. I went ahead and tried to get ready for work,... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    Quote from HappyJaxRN
    My employer is cracking down...and rightfully so..because there are people that are taking advantage of the call out policy. But it's hurting people like me who are truly sick.

    So the happy ending, I WILL have FMLA papers filled out when I see my GP in June. But I have to hope I don't get sick again until then.
    And my hospital has the opposite problem......people taking advantage of FMLA.

    You most definitely should fill out your FMLA paperwork because it truely does protect you and you are entitled to do so, but since you brought up FMLA I have to say that I'm getting tired of people taking advanatge of it.

    My manager knows that she can't touch anyone on FMLA so she takes it out on the rest of us who call in once or twice per year. I get the guilt trips, attitude, and punished via bad schedule whenever I call in which was a grand total of two times for fiscal year 2006.

    I wish I could get a doctor to say that I have chronic "migraines" because it burns me to see people partying it up friday night knowing that they can call in once again on saturday with one of their famous chronic "migraines" protected by FMLA. Or they suddenly come down with a migraine if they get a hard assignment and conveniently have to go home. Or their child has yet another flare-up of some chronic illness, chronic back pain, etc. it just gets ridiculous how much FMLA gets abused on the units where I work.

    FMLA has it's place and everyone who qualifies should most definitely use it, but make no mistake about it, FMLA gets just as abused by people as any call out policy.
  2. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from RN34TX
    And my hospital has the opposite problem......people taking advantage of FMLA.

    You most definitely should fill out your FMLA paperwork because it truely does protect you and you are entitled to do so, but since you brought up FMLA I have to say that I'm getting tired of people taking advanatge of it.

    My manager knows that she can't touch anyone on FMLA so she takes it out on the rest of us who call in once or twice per year. I get the guilt trips, attitude, and punished via bad schedule whenever I call in which was a grand total of two times for fiscal year 2006.

    I wish I could get a doctor to say that I have chronic "migraines" because it burns me to see people partying it up friday night knowing that they can call in once again on saturday with one of their famous chronic "migraines" protected by FMLA. Or they suddenly come down with a migraine if they get a hard assignment and conveniently have to go home. Or their child has yet another flare-up of some chronic illness, chronic back pain, etc. it just gets ridiculous how much FMLA gets abused on the units where I work.

    FMLA has it's place and everyone who qualifies should most definitely use it, but make no mistake about it, FMLA gets just as abused by people as any call out policy.
    Yep. I've seen that too. People call out with the FMLA when they want to have a day off just for the FUN of it...Just doesn't seem fair no matter what you do.
  3. by   wonderbee
    Sounds typical to me and very much like the way my former place of employment was run. I'm good for at least one bout with a cold/flu a year that's bad enough to keep me out of work for a couple of days. Throw in an injury and an urgent family matter and voila! We're in write up territory.

    I mean we get all this bombardment with health information from our insurance companies on eating right, getting enough sleep and taking care of illnesses when they occur but the culture is the exact antithesis. Do they think that if they tell us "hope you feel better" wen we call off that we'l take advantage or something? What's wrong with a little compassion shown toward each other?

    A rant.... sorry. I left hospital work for hospice because of just such nonsensical insensitive doctrines. I haven't heard the word "write up" since I left. Union is the only way I'd work in a hospital again.
  4. by   KellieNurse06
    I think some places have such strict rules for calling out sick because people have abused it so much.....so it ruined it for those who really were sick.......I know someone who worked in a big hospital and unless you were crawling in dying, you had to be there (unless of course you could trade off a shift with someone else on your own) , they had a rule ......the people in the hospital are sick, so if you are sick as well it doesn't matter.....and they would adjust your patient assignments accordingly.....if someone was immunocompromised then you wouldn't have them if you had a contagious illness like a cold etc.And they had a person who was working with a cold, wear a mask for example.....
    I think rules have to be made even as crazy as they may sound because if not , then people take advantage......give an inch they take a mile so to speak......
    I don't know how I feel because I am not one who ever really calls out sick....if I call out it's pretty serious.......I know people get sick & have no control over it, it's a fact of life......I can see both sides of it though...
  5. by   nurseinlimbo
    We accrue sick time at a rate of 1 day for every 120 hours. It is implied that you have to be on deaths door before you call in, and depending on who answers, you will be harrassed (usually). UNA (Alberta's nurses union) has a strict no harassment policy, but it still happens and isn't enforced. I don't get sick often thank goodness, and if I was, I wouldn't feel guilty about calling in. It is sort of absurd to have notices posted on entrance doors about not visiting patients if you have a cold or flu, yet staff are expected to work. Especially when our jobs are what are running us into the ground and making us sick in the first place.

    It sounds like you have something serious enough to stay home for, and I'd get a doctor's note and forget about it. I can't believe they'd give you grief over an appendectomy, WOW! What were you supposed to do? That is just heartless.
  6. by   Cmariehart
    The first time I called in I was taken out by an MD and no one gave me grief about it- probably because I came to work anyways and my right eye was swollen shut and the supervisor took me to the ER to have it looked at and I was out for 2 days......

    I called in sick in November and got a hard time about it-- our unit had been on look down due to some nasty stomach bug and 18 out of 42 people had it and I got it..

    So when I got sick in Feb and needed to call in my fiance call in for me and he asked for the DON and told her I wasn't coming in because I was throwing up, diarrhea, temp was 102.6 and guess what they DIDN"T give him a hard time at all....
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    jax if you have documented autoimmune disorder that qualifies as a disability...follow up on this because it may be to your benefit
  8. by   welnet66
    Calling out sick is a tough issue for nursing. First, you're sick and shouldn't be around patients. Second, you're very likely not going to be replaced, leaving your coworkers to sweat it out that day. Here's a few tips for you and anyone else out there compelled to pick up the phone...
    1. Make sure you are the one calling in, not your spouse/partner.
    2. Never ever tell your employer/supervisor/charge nurse what is wrong with you. You are sick and that's it. If asked, it is none of their business. Ever hear of HIPPA?
    3. Don't make it a habit. If you think for one second that your sick calls are not kept track of, you will be in for a rude awakening.
    4. Really, don't make it a habit. Your coworkers will appreciate it.
  9. by   Dalzac
    when my arthritis got so bad I would call in. My manager told me to go to HR and pick up forms for FMLA and have intermittant fmla that means if you have to callin it is covered underthat
  10. by   nurseinlimbo
    What is FMLA?
  11. by   Djuna
    I don't know what 'written up' means but it sounds bad. In Australia we have an allocated 5 days of paid sick leave per year. If we take more sick leave we don't get paid for that, but we are never reprimanded for being ill.
  12. by   Susan9608
    I went to the doctor. I definitely have strep throat. She also thinks I have some kind of gastro, probably from being in Mexico last week. The doctor said it was ridiculous to think I should be working with critically ill kids (I'm a PICU nurse) with strep throat; her exact words were, "don't they care if you give strep to all the kids and all your coworkers?"

    Ha! Answer is NO. They just want me to work.

    I got a note. I faxed it to them and emailed my direct supervisor. I think I'm going to talk to my nurse manager about this problem, and maybe even HR. It seems like it's a common problem, from what all of you say, and I personally think that it needs to be dealt with.

    I wouldn't want someone who was ill taking care of me. I doubt any of the parents would want someone who was ill caring for their children. Plus, we have had a low census lately; when I was at work on Thursday, they were sending nurses home. Sheesh.
  13. by   reesern63
    You can't use FMLA for a cold one time, then stomach flu the next, etc. If you have a chronic illness (e.g. heart problems, diabetes, migraines), you may use FMLA in blocks of time or intermittently up to a total of 12 weeks. You cannot be penalized for utilizing FMLA time, but it must be related to your illness. Unrelated illness won't be covered. You may also use FMLA for the serious illness of a family member

    You also have to have been employed by the facility for at least one year and worked for at least 1250 hours to qualify.

    FAQs on FMLA

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