If you could redo it....would you choose nursing? - page 3

Would you redo choosing nursing or the medical profession? Curious to the feelings of others... Read More

  1. by   Workitinurfava
    I am going for MD right now. It is not about the money but rather the way in which they work. At the same time as a nurse I work my buns off and don't feel that the risk, and hard-work equal out to the pay I am getting. I just can't see myself being the doctors assistant forever. I would rather be in charge as a MD and direct people on what to do.
    Last edit by Workitinurfava on Jun 28
  2. by   CBlover
    I have mixed feelings. I wish now I had chosen some branch of law enforcement. I do enjoy what I do more now since finding the ER. More my niche. Floor nursing just stinks most of the time. What I REALLY would rather do is stay home with my almost 2 y.o. I LOVE my days off with him. I never pick up extra anymore. I just rather be home with him than make an extra buck.
  3. by   firemedic12
    I'd do it again without question. I started out in a level 1 trauma ICU and loved it. I still work there PRN. I'm now in the PICU at a level 1 teaching facility and love it just as much. My patients are super interesting and I love a fresh, ***** trauma admit.
  4. by   popopopo
    I voted for medical school, but the me 10 years ago in nursing school would have failed out of pre-med courses. Ask me 10 years ago and I would have absolutely choose nursing. I'm thankful for nursing for giving me many valuable clinical skills and now I'm more mature and better at schooling. I plan to go to medical school before I'm a grandpa.
  5. by   middleagednurse
    I don't really regret being a nurse however I wish I had furthered my education. As it is 'I don't get no respect".
  6. by   middleagednurse
    I have been a nurse for 46 years and nobody gives a dam.If I had been an MD that long people would revere me.
  7. by   FolksBtrippin
    Quote from purplegal
    If I'd known I'd end up working most days of the month, including a period of 38 days in a row without a day off, with absolutely no weekends or holidays off, then no, I wouldn't have chosen nursing.
    That's not because you are a nurse. That's because you choose to work 2 jobs.
  8. by   kbrn2002
    I came into nursing as a second career and don't regret it. Right out of high school my plan was to be a teacher, less than two years of college in I changed my mind. Boy am I glad I did. I make as much or more money with my lowly ADN than teachers I know. I also have more job security, it's not easy getting a full time teaching job in a good school district and some of the horror stories I've heard from teacher acquaintances that live and work in higher crime areas rival any horror story I've heard from nurses. Nursing has been a good fit for me. So yes, I'd do it again.
  9. by   cunninghamtarra
    WITHOUT A DOUBT! When I started this, I was a young single mother and wasn't sure what I wanted to do with my life. My mom was a nurse, but it definitely was not on my radar growing up. I got my CNA just so I could support my son, and it snowballed from there. I have never once regretted it. I came into this profession to make a living, but I mostly definitely stayed and continued my education because I love what I do.
  10. by   puravidaLV
    Yep, wouldn't have waited till my thirties thought. I think of all the cool JDM race parts, club nights, places i could have done 13 week contracts in/at/around, that 250cc ninja would have been a hyabusa, student loands would be long paid off, NP school done, heck i might even had been able to continue living in palo alto with no house payment.

    Both my parents talked me out of going to medical school (both doctors and screwed by HMO), I have a business degree (B.S) which is basically useless (Finance & accounting are the only two that matter the rest pretty much are summer camp don't learn anything classes, I've been in management and that sucks, and other well I have an awesome collection of name tags from fast food places which just helps me each year now for holloween.
  11. by   llg
    I probably would do a few things differently, but still become a nurse. Mostly, I would have double-majored in college or gotten more education in a different field (either history or statistics) to give me more options at an advanced level.

    I grew up in a very small town and didn't realize all the possibilities to combine nursing with another field. So I didn't take advantage of college opportunities to double-major (just out of high school) and felt intimidated by suddenly jumping into another field in my 20's and 30's. Also, it was harder to go to school back then "just for fun" because online education didn't exist. It would have been very difficult to work rotating shifts as a staff nurse, get my MSN, and also take a few courses in mathematics or history having to go to campus for all classes. So I stuck with 100% at the graduate level, missing opportunities to get credentials in history or math to combine with my nursing career.

    I would love to have become a nurse historian or a research statistician.
  12. by   middleagedRN
    Absolutely! Love my job, love my residents. Then payday rolls around and I'm like "Are you kidding me?? I made this much money for doing what I love??" Yup, so thankful to be where I'm at and what I'm doing! ❤️
  13. by   SurfCA40
    Quote from CBlover
    I have mixed feelings. I wish now I had chosen some branch of law enforcement. I do enjoy what I do more now since finding the ER. More my niche. Floor nursing just stinks most of the time. What I REALLY would rather do is stay home with my almost 2 y.o. I LOVE my days off with him. I never pick up extra anymore. I just rather be home with him than make an extra buck.
    To each is their own, but I'm coming from law enforcement trying to get out and get into nursing. I started working my first non-cop job in law enforcement 12 years ago, and have been a cop for 7 years. Things have changed so much, it's a terrible time to enter law enforcement. You're much better off in healthcare.

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