If you are drunk, don't drive! - page 9

If you are a nurse, and you drive while you are drunk; the Board of Nursing can suspend your nursing license for good!!! This is hard to believe...but it is true!!!!... Read More

  1. by   piper_for_hire
    And of course .... if someone has a DUI they must be drunk at work. WHAT? And of course ... to force someone to have morality you threaten them - in this case with taking their license away. HUH? Truly illogical conclusions to justify a truly unethical practice.

    -S
  2. by   katilynn
    Shoot, the people at my work in debt or have bad credit are always covering shifts, working doubles, holiday whatever.

    Good luck getting a hold of this girl with good credit scores.
  3. by   LeahJet
    Sorry if this is Off Topic.....but I've always wondered.....

    What does a person's credit rating have to do with anything??
  4. by   gemini81sg
    I agree...there are many things that nurses do that they shouldn't do. Think about how many obese nurses you see in any facility or how many nurses (including Respiratory Therapists!) sneak out to smoke on their breaks.

    I'm not voting for Pro-Drinking and Driving or anything, but you can get an OWI or DUI pretty easy with the legal limit being .08 in most states. That's a drink or two from a christmas party....not everyone who gets these tickets are "drunks". Stealing money from patients, taking narcotics from the job, denying pain meds to a patient because it's your opinion that he or she is not in pain, denying eqaul cares and services to a patient because you don't like their lifestyle or race for that matter.....these things to me, are much worse than getting a drinking and driving ticket.

    I don't think a license should be taken for this pending the extent of the circumstances of course. I mean, if you get a DUI on your way to work as a nurse, then I really think you should reconsider being a nurse, and check in to some counseling and rehab real soon!!
  5. by   LuvMyGamecocks
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    And of course .... if someone has a DUI they must be drunk at work. WHAT? And of course ... to force someone to have morality you threaten them - in this case with taking their license away. HUH? Truly illogical conclusions to justify a truly unethical practice.

    -S
    I never said that is someone has a DUI they must be drunk at work. You assumed that. Separate the DUI issue from clinical ability. The MINDSET is still the same. IF you're holding your OWN self (without the involvement of anything or anyone else) accountable for the drinks you had at a Christmas party or at happy hour with your colleagues, there's NO NEED for anyone else to hold you accountable. But, if someone cannot exercise that good judgment and hold themselves accountable for any repercussions, do you just expect to sweep it under the rug? Where's the demand for integrity?

    I agree that not all circumstances are the same. But, expecting some sort of acceptable moral code (and integrity...personal accountability) of nurses (of anyone, really) is illogical? Seriously?
  6. by   Quickbeam
    Since I work with driver's licenses all day long (DOT nurse) I wanted to add something else to the discussion. I just finished a review of the prohibitions for being a school bus driver in my state. The list is 10 pages long. About 75% of those things are completely not driving related. Any felony convictions. Most misdemeanors too. By record check, it is harder to get a school bus driver's license than it is to teach children or be a nurse in my state.

    I'm not saying that this is right. But many professions have standards above and beyond the minimal licensure.

    The credit check stuff? Creeps me out.
  7. by   piper_for_hire
    of course it is illogical. how would one do that? who is qualified to determine what the proper moral code is for nurses? for anyone? certainly not the people who run the licensing board. how would one prove that a person is acting morally or not? the courts can't determine this - how would a nursing board determine this? this would be an epic undertaking. instead, the nursing board moronically decided that a DUI is the equivalent of a moral judgment. laws do not govern morality, obviously. such open stupidity should be grounds for termination from such a job. this behavior is appalling.
  8. by   Ann RN
    "the nursing board moronically decided that a DUI is the equivalent of a moral judgment. laws do not govern morality"

    Actually, they do. Take a really close look at your State Board's laws. Whether you agree or not, you are bound by them. If you disagree that much, you have the option to leave the profession.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from Ann RN
    "the nursing board moronically decided that a DUI is the equivalent of a moral judgment. laws do not govern morality"

    Actually, they do. Take a really close look at your State Board's laws. Whether you agree or not, you are bound by them. If you disagree that much, you have the option to leave the profession.
    Yep, many BON have defined a minimum standard of morality.

    In some states it's a felony conviction, in others this might include a DUI. Yes, it might catch the person who drank a couple of glasses of wine at a Chrsitmas party that is an outstanding nurse in every way, but it's their minimum standard.

    BTW the 0.08 that most states now use is not a moral judgement. It's based on scientific evidence that a person is too impaired to drive at this level. Every body is different. Most people who claim they are fine after a few drinks, probably would indeed not perform 100% if they were put to the task under observation because we tend to overestimate our abilities. People with high tolerances, like alcholics, as was mentioned live a 0.08 and probably aren't impaired at all, but still have no business driving after drinking.

    So to the excellent nursing innocently drinking a couple of drinks after work, or at a Christmas party, think twice.
  10. by   piper_for_hire
    We are talking about apples and oranges here. The state boards "laws" are not the same as actual legal laws. Just like the laws of physics are different than the state boards "laws". They are different.

    Yes - everyone has the option to tuck-tail and run when faced with an authority in the wrong. The idea that laws are absolute and correct just because someone has written them down is terrifying and quite the opposite of how we do things in America.

    -S
  11. by   Ann RN
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    We are talking about apples and oranges here. The state boards "laws" are not the same as actual legal laws. Just like the laws of physics are different than the state boards "laws". They are different.

    Yes - everyone has the option to tuck-tail and run when faced with an authority in the wrong. The idea that laws are absolute and correct just because someone has written them down is terrifying and quite the opposite of how we do things in America.

    -S
    Last time I looked, I did work in America (although on a busy day in the Trauma ICU with 15 family members setting up Aero beds in the waiting room I might think differently). And I'm not terrified.
  12. by   piper_for_hire
    Wow - so you are saying that laws are absolute and should not be challenged? It's good that you admitted that. Now I totally understand your point of view. Some are leaders and some are followers. I get what you are saying. From my point of view such a state of affairs would be truly terrifying but we don't have such a system in America, although it can feel that way from time to time.

    -S
  13. by   Ann RN
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    Wow - so you are saying that laws are absolute and should not be challenged? It's good that you admitted that. Now I totally understand your point of view. Some are leaders and some are followers. I get what you are saying. From my point of view such a state of affairs would be truly terrifying but we don't have such a system in America, although it can feel that way from time to time.

    -S
    If you want to be what you believe a leader is, take your sarcasm and challange the laws. Offer a solution. Don't just say something is wrong. I wish you the best. But for the time being, you are working under these laws.

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