If not bedside, where do you work?

  1. I'm looking into alternatives to bedside nursing. I'm in too much pain to be able to do anything but my job at this point, so I definitely need something less physical. I don't want to live at my chiropractors and I refuse to get pain meds.

    I have an ADN, plenty of (adult, especially geriatric) clinical experience, very strong office, writing, and teaching skills. I do not want to be a manager, nor do I think I would like to be on salary.

    I am willing to learn but have zero desire to go back to school.

    Any suggestions?
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Dec 18, '06
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   SharonH, RN
    Angie, in my 15+ years of nursing working at the bedside has always been my side job. I never could stand to work 40 hours a week at the bedside. Currently I am a research nurse. Prior to this I worked in:

    1)Employee health
    2)Telephone advice
    3)Pre-admission testing
    4)Home Health
    5)Corrections

    There was probably some other things along the way but I cannot remember them right now. None of these positions required extra training that I could not get in orientation nor did they require a BSN although I was one(now a MSN). Keep your eyes open and you will find your opportunity.
  4. by   UM Review RN
    Could you please elaborate? What exactly does your job entail? What training, hours, experience? How's the pay and benes? Do you work at an office, a hospital, or some other location?

    I never investigated any of these jobs before because I was quite happy at the bedside until a few months ago.
  5. by   tnbutterfly
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I'm looking into alternatives to bedside nursing. I'm in too much pain to be able to do anything but my job at this point, so I definitely need something less physical. I don't want to live at my chiropractors and I refuse to get pain meds.

    I have an ADN, plenty of (adult, especially geriatric) clinical experience, very strong office, writing, and teaching skills. I do not want to be a manager, nor do I think I would like to be on salary.

    I am willing to learn but have zero desire to go back to school.

    Any suggestions?
    Hi Angie O'Plasty
    I am employed as a Parish Nurse. I don't do any "bedside nursing" so to speak. I am employed jointly by a hospital and a church. If you are interested in learning more about this, check out the Parish Nursing forum or feel free to pm me.
  6. by   allantiques4me
    Youre lucky youre an RN,the door is open wideI,personally work at a residential facility for kids with behavioral issues.I totally love it!I medicate about 35 kids at 8am( or not) sometimes we have a medication aid that does that.I basically feel like a mom.I treat small skin wounds rashes,minor sicknesses,immunizations,hts,wts,v/svery low stress.I dont do a lot of physical exhertion,however alot of walking since it is a campus.Good luck in your search.:spin:
  7. by   sourkuss
    I work as an office nurse with LPN's and RN's. I love it but I feel guilty I dont use my skills! I just schedule procedures and give pt's instructions. But the pay is good and the people rock...and who cant love no nights weekends or holidays???
  8. by   mercyteapot
    I work for a disability resource agency. It is interesting (most days), but the pay is about half that of what most bedside nurses make here. Still, it is largely M-F, holidays off, good benes (because we're affiliated with a major state university) and lots of flexibility in scheduling.
  9. by   SaderNurse05
    I work in public health as a case manager. It is 8-5 M-F and very autonomous. I can decide whether I need to stay in the office all day or maybe schedule a day to go out in the surrounding counties to see patients. I make the exact same as my compadres at the hospital per hour but I get much better benefits such as actual holidays, good insurance and a great retirement plan. In Texas almost all counties and cities participate in TMRS. Feel free to PM me if you need more information. I enjoy reading your posts and have no doubt there is an awesome job out there with your name on it!
  10. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I'm looking into alternatives to bedside nursing. I'm in too much pain to be able to do anything but my job at this point, so I definitely need something less physical. I don't want to live at my chiropractors and I refuse to get pain meds.

    I have an ADN, plenty of (adult, especially geriatric) clinical experience, very strong office, writing, and teaching skills. I do not want to be a manager, nor do I think I would like to be on salary.

    I am willing to learn but have zero desire to go back to school.

    Any suggestions?
    Sounds like you're in a similar place where I was a year ago. I was in a lot of physical pain from pushing my forty-something, out-of-condition body through four 8-hour shifts per week on a Med/Surg floor, and I knew I had to make a change. I had no idea how I was going to accomplish this, however; I'd been trying to convince myself for years that I really should go back and get my BSN, but the trouble was, I had no desire whatsoever to do so.

    Luckily, my current position as DNS in an assisted living facility doesn't require a bachelor's (although it was 'strongly preferred' according to the job description), and since I hope to continue in this same job, or one like it, for the rest of my career, I'm no longer feeling the pressure to go back to school. It's also much easier on me physically, as I no longer do 'bedside' care, except when I want to follow a particular situation or just give someone a little extra TLC.

    Now, I'm one of those weird people who actually LIKES being a manager, but if you don't, you could try utilization review, discharge planning, even geriatric case management.........many organizations are willing to train a nurse with lots of experience in lieu of a bachelor's degree. I wish you all the luck in the world, Angie; please keep us posted and let us know how things are going.:spin:
  11. by   UM Review RN
    That's it, Marla. I'm a little older, but I've whined enough about my back and my feet to feel I've sufficiently martyred myself to the cause.

    Maybe it was those 10+ years of being a CNA and doing thousands of hours of overtime that finally added up to this, but I'm not the kind to be in tears over being a little footsore and a little stiff in the back.

    We've been doing almost all primary care lately. I LOVE the patient contact, BUT it's killing me physically. What's worse is, my assignments aren't all that hard, they're not like they're all confused train wrecks and such.

    I hate the thought of changing, but this morning when I just touched my finger to my heel and it felt like I'd driven a spike through my foot, I broke down and took about 1000 mg of Advil. I seriously think it's plantar fasciitis.

    Anyhow, an office job where I could have normal hours and get a decent pay that would pay the bills would be just great for me. Patient contact would be nice, but I'd prefer telephone contact.

    But I simply cannot do a lot of lifting, pulling, or walking.

    And I'm not sure what's worse--having to admit that I can't cut it anymore or having to deal with the pain.
  12. by   Valanda
    I worked for a medical equipment company for awhile. I really enjoyed it. No two days were the same. Orders would come in for everything from home oxygen to penile pumps. I was responsible for obtaining the ordered item. Sometimes this meant just getting it from the warehouse, but sometimes it involved internet research to find some obsure item. Also had to contact insurance companies, make sure the item would be covered, then teach the patient how to use the item.
    I learned so many different things through this experience. Learned how to select the best interface for CPAP, how to measure for custom compression hose, how to select the most appropriate ostomy products for a patient, I started to learn how to fit post mastectomy women for prosthetics.
    I only suggest this line of work because you mentioned that you were a good teacher, and above all this placement required teaching.

    I'd still be doing it except that it was straight office hours, Monday-Friday, no holidays and I just don't function well on dayshift hours.
  13. by   outcomesfirst
    Please see your doctor about your physical issues - treatment is the best prevention of chronic illness. You must care for yourself first.
  14. by   tiggerforhim
    Angie, I'm a disease manager working for an insurance company. We work with chronic diseases (16) including some you've never heard of. We are not Ask-a-Nurse, we actually call the members every 3 months and assess them. It's all over the phone, there is no hands on or walking. The training is pretty intensive but it's good pay, comparable to bedside nursing here. It's a salaried position with no paid overtime but if you work 10/12 hour shifts you get a shift diff. It is VERY different working in the corporate world rather than health care per se, but it's a good job for me at this time in my life. I'm licensed in all the lower 48 states and will never be able to commit any crimes because at least half the states in the Union already have my fingerprints! You can work from home at this job, and this has been one of the major perks. It has helped a lot for me as I'm currently about 7 months pregnant and am not having to kill myself out on the floor. You can PM me if you have further questions.

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