I was "terminated" because of school!!!

  1. I just found out last Friday that I was terminated from my job when I started school!

    I had worked in a LTCF as a CNA for awhile. I enjoyed my job, not necessarily the people I worked with, but I loved the ones I worked for (the elderly). I have always thought of going back to school when our youngest went to 1st grade. Now I am in LPN school. I had always been under the impression that if you worked in Health Care, the company would stand behind you and be for you going back to school to get a nursing degree.... not so.

    As the time for school approached, I went in to my DON and told her of my plans, in plenty of time to find a replacement for me on my 1st shift, full time CNA status. About 2 months in advance. She told me she would put me on "Casual Status" when school started and they would call me when they were short to see if I could work. I agreed. After about a month of no phone calls, and after my school schedule was pretty much in a routine, I called to ask her if I could work every other Friday night. (I was doing Home Health every other Saturday all day.)

    When I asked her that, she sounded a bit shocked and said, "Julie, your job has been terminated. Since you didn't work one day last month, we took you off our schedule."

    WHAT?????

    But to make me feel better she did say that if I wanted to continue working for that company, I could come in and reapply and start the whole process over.
    I said, "No thanks."

    And you know the worst part of the whole deal? I have to do a 6 week clinical rotation there, starting next month!!!


    Oh well..... Thanks for letting me blow off some steam!

    Julie
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Genista
    Wow! Talk about poor communication. Maybe they should have told you that ahead of time! Anyway, best of luck in school, Julie. Hope your rotation on your old floor goes well (at least you are familiar w/ the place). ;-)
  4. by   moonshadeau
    Congratulations on going back to school. As for the job, well, the places that I have worked in the past had stated that to be on casual duty is to still have the responsibilty to work one shift a month and ususally they don't call you. You have to call them and let them know when you are available to work. But I do have to say that it is pretty crummy that they didn't write you a letter with a warning that you needed to work a shift before being terminated. As for going there for clinicals, I wouldn't worry about it. It sounds like you left in good standing and they were willing to hire you back.
  5. by   Q.
    Hi Julie:

    Moonshadeau has it pretty well done pat. I also work casual status (per diem) at the hospital while working full time in the clinic setting. They call me once in a while for extra help, but it is my responsibility to make sure I work the minimum number of hours, which is usually 1 shift per pay period. I have to tell them when I am available for work. Working a minimum is necessary to ensure that you are competent and safe to continue working on the floor. Any less than that and you could pose a risk, as far as knowing new policies, procedures, etc.

    Sounds like there was a gap in communication; your manager should have made it clear to you what your responsibilities were when accepting a casual position.

    Good luck in school.
  6. by   h vigliotti
    holy cow! well, i guess you can grace some other institution with your pressence. could you work evry other weekend? that is what i did when i went to nursing school. but the nursing home i worked at understood, they didn't get in the way of my "bettering" myself, and any institution that doesn't recognize the nature of that game will find that other institutions will gladly except your application of employment. the world is in your hands, baby! if you work 100% in most hospitals for as little as one year, many of them will foot the bill for your education (you will owe them a year of employment) i'm also sure its a little more complicated than that, but heck! i don't know how it is for lpn's but rn school is definitely an investment that under these times, an institution is willing to invest in.
    Originally posted by Julielpn
    I just found out last Friday that I was terminated from my job when I started school!

    I had worked in a LTCF as a CNA for awhile. I enjoyed my job, not necessarily the people I worked with, but I loved the ones I worked for (the elderly). I have always thought of going back to school when our youngest went to 1st grade. Now I am in LPN school. I had always been under the impression that if you worked in Health Care, the company would stand behind you and be for you going back to school to get a nursing degree.... not so.

    As the time for school approached, I went in to my DON and told her of my plans, in plenty of time to find a replacement for me on my 1st shift, full time CNA status. About 2 months in advance. She told me she would put me on "Casual Status" when school started and they would call me when they were short to see if I could work. I agreed. After about a month of no phone calls, and after my school schedule was pretty much in a routine, I called to ask her if I could work every other Friday night. (I was doing Home Health every other Saturday all day.)

    When I asked her that, she sounded a bit shocked and said, "Julie, your job has been terminated. Since you didn't work one day last month, we took you off our schedule."

    WHAT?????

    But to make me feel better she did say that if I wanted to continue working for that company, I could come in and reapply and start the whole process over.
    I said, "No thanks."

    And you know the worst part of the whole deal? I have to do a 6 week clinical rotation there, starting next month!!!


    Oh well..... Thanks for letting me blow off some steam!

    Julie
  7. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Did this former employer have a tuition reimbursement plan?

    Betcha you don't qualify if your terminated

    Some places have a minimum time you have to work for them to get a reimbursement, as a previouse post suggested.
    Sounds like an administrative ploy to get around helping with the tuition, but still retaining your qualified services by hiring you back.

    When someone is terminated and then offered the job back with no performance issues and no pre-termination counciling, something is not right.

    Administration............the ominouse growth you're afraid might be cancer, on the epidermal layer of our lives.

    Brad
    Columbia, MD

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