I think nurses share some of the blame for the nursing shortage. - page 3

I read recently that only 12% of all nurses are under the age of 30. Being a new graduate BSN and practicing nursing for 18 months, I found that statistic pretty horrifying. I have been visiting... Read More

  1. by   nightingale
    thegame: Again, I am sorry you were treated badly. I do not agree it is the majority at all.

    B.
  2. by   sjoe
    nightngale, you said it in posts 11 and 17 about standing up for ourselves.

    What is most amazing is that nursing students seem to have the notion that they are powerless--forgetting WHO is paying these instructors to teach THEM what they need to be a licensed/registered nurse AND paying the schools to provide suitable clinical placements. If this is not being done for whatever reason, raise hell and demand the quality for which you are paying! Why accept ridicule or belittling from instructors or from anyone else? Why just passively leave a program in which one has invested time and money instead of kicking some butt?

    School is a good time for learning, including learning how to stand up for oneself. Not doing so simply perpetuates the "righteous victim" and "superior victimizer" cycle.
    Last edit by sjoe on Sep 3, '02
  3. by   Teshiee
    fergus51

    I have heard of that. There was an article in Nurseweek speaking on abuses from physicians. I don't that is the main reason it falls under the abuse but there are many more reasons one gets tired of their profession. I have been a RN for 2 years and understand why nurses want to go. I on the other hand know there is too much to do in this field to let it go. I am trying to make the most of it even when I don't want too.
  4. by   txsugar
    thegame...I work for Pacificare Health Systems as an auditor. The offices are actually located just down the road from UTSA. If you are going to medical school, you will be going to the UT Health Science center which is located in heart of the medical center of San Antonio and about 15 minutes from me. I am near the Fiesta Texas grounds. UTHS is a really good school and the hospital you will intern at (University) is a huge teaching hospital. Everyone in town knows if you want to learn, whether you are a nurse or a lab tech or a doc, you go to University because you see everything there. Good choice.
    I apologize for insinuating that you abandoned patients. I misunderstood your post. there was no abandonment in your situation because you were never put on the floor or assigned any patients. sorry about that.
    With the agency I work for I do prn shifts in the Baptist Health System hospitals including St. Luke's Hospital. It's amazing how the hospitals can all be in the same system and yet so completely different. I recently had surgery at St. Luke's and the staff, especially my pre-op RN were so great I have praised them over and over to anyone who will listen!
    Keep me posted on how you do. I had a friend who came over here from Poland as a nun. She left the nunnery and got her CNA then her LVN then her RN and she is currently attending medical school and will move to Florida to share a practice with her brother. It took her a while but she was very encouraging and I think she did great.
    Best of luck!!
  5. by   Flo1216
    I agree with you. when we have our clinicals most of the nurses are nasty *****es to us and make fun of us, etc. Like they were never students and they came out of school knowing everything. The doctors are nicer. One nurse actually got fired for her treatment of the students. And our school was actually dropped by one of the facilities where we did our pysch rotation because the head nurse decided to curse out one of my classmates(in public) and then she and my instructor got into it, etc. I know not all nurses are ogres but i am now a senior and I have found that the majority of them are not very receptive to students. Then they ***** if the student graduates and doesn't know anything. People just suck sometimes, i guess.
  6. by   NurseDianne
    I agree with "some" of the thread starting comments. Only about 10%. Ever heard, if you can't stand the heat?.......... One of the reasons staff doesn't like to have nursing students is this....very few are really interested in learning. They are only there because it is a requirement for the class. And it is a burden when you have someone on the floor that isn't willing the pitch in and help, with whatever the task may be. Not "oh, I really didn't want to feed that patient, I can give meds now". When I was a student, I got some of both reception from staff. I found that when I pitched in to help the CNA's or do whatever needed to be done, I was welcomed w/ open arms.
    As far as RN's in training, yes, as an LPN, I have been guilty of saying, OH NO, I don't want to train that new RN. :imbar so, sue me, i'm human. But, alot of the time, instead of the new nurse accepting what they can learn from this "old" LPN, they have "RN-itis". A good LPN or CNA can teach a new RN plenty, if they will just learn.
    I am back in school now, to reach that goal of RN. Hopefully I can steer clear of the RN-itis myself .
    In fact, several of my charge nurses at work now, where once being trained by me. And if I may say so, are damn fine charge nurses today.........especially "CHARGERN" you see on here occasionally!
  7. by   NurseDianne
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by JailRN
    [B]Thegame

    Am I the only one to see something VERY wrong here?? You stated that you "Told the charge nurse that you didn't like the way things were run here and left in the middle of your shift??" Can we say, patient abandonment?? Do you value your license? If I had been the charge nurse, not only would have I been glad to see you go, but also have seen to it that you were reported to the BRN.

    :stone I did forget to comment on this..........I am very much appalled that you would leave in the middle of a shift, regardless of what was going on. I'm certain there was someone you could have gone to. I aggree w/ JailRN, that is a very BIG NONO! Didn't they teach you that? And how did you possibly get another job? Forget to say you had abandoned the first one?
  8. by   ACNORN
    I did forget to comment on this..........I am very much appalled that you would leave in the middle of a shift, regardless of what was going on. I'm certain there was someone you could have gone to. I aggree w/ JailRN, that is a very BIG NONO! Didn't they teach you that? And how did you possibly get another job? Forget to say you had abandoned the first one?
    Nurse Diane, please refer to the last post by TheGame. IMO it was not patient abandonment. Yes, the supervisor could have been called, the orientee could have sought another preceptor during that shift, but it would not surprise me one bit if many employees would choose to leave when they were just sitting around waiting for someone to be willing to orient them.
  9. by   Pretzlgl
    ... One of the reasons staff doesn't like to have nursing students is this....very few are really interested in learning. They are only there because it is a requirement for the class. And it is a burden when you have someone on the floor that isn't willing the pitch in and help, with whatever the task may be. Not "oh, I really didn't want to feed that patient, I can give meds now".

    I agree with this totally NurseDiane - I've had the same experience with some nursing students. Some are more interested in what they did over the weekend than taking care of patients!
  10. by   pebbles
    .... and lets look at some of the factors that make experienced nurses get grouchy or fed up with students, make them not want to mentor students. (I refused a student preceptor assignment this past summer because I was so burnt out I was barely holding myself afloat...) I'm too tired from work to find links to the many, many threads on this issue right now, but they are there if you look.

    Lashing back at the senior nurses makes you part of the problem, makes you just as bad in a way. If all of the nurses in a clinical placement are rude or belittling to you, if they are hostile and unreceptive to students as a whole, then the nursing unit probably has bigger problems that the students just get stuck in the middle of. Take this up with your school, and get them to not place students there. Grouching about the nasty B........es on a bb on the net won't help them, and it won't help you deal with this problem constructively. Vent, sure. But that is different from blaming, which is what this thread started as....


    There are many, many factors that contribute to the "health" of a nursing unit and workplace environment. Placing students in an unhealthy environment does not make sense... both for the students and for the nurses that work there. When you are burnt out, overworked and dealing with big work-related stress already, having to mentor students IS a BURDEN...... when the unit is healthy, decently staffed, etc.... it is easier to treat the students as just beginners and to have the time to be a sympathetic teacher..... Bottom line: This is far from being a one sided issue. Please stop flinging mud before you become as bitter as the people you claim to resent.
  11. by   thegame
    Thanks Acnorn for covering for me.
    What brough up this subject was a recent article in the New York Times. They stated that only 12% of all nurses are below the age of thiry. I began thinking, why is there very few nurses entering the profession of nursing? The pay is not bad by all means, one could live comfterably on a nursing salery. Hince more males entering the profession.

    Since I graduated in the class of 2000, and being such a new nurse what would swade young men and women from entering the profession. There seems to be an over abundance of applications for other medical professions requiring a 4 year degree. Since we are all nurses we know that the profession is not a glamerous as being a physician or physical therapist. This is due to the nature of of our profession (hint dirty work). I currently work with nurses who say they would not recommend the profession to any relative, nursing has taken a turn for the worse the last 10 years. How about the students who dropped out becuase they thought nurses were very disresptuful to them during clinicals. Two of them now are teachers and love it. Is everyone getting the message?

    I would say a majority of students going into clinicals are more than earger to impress. I know there to be a few who are hung over from the night before. This is not an excuse to make it open season for LVN's and Nursing Assistants to dump as much work on you as possible and then complain to other nurses about you.

    I thought we were there to learn pt care, and I know some of you will say that is part of pt care. Belive me I know becasue I worked as a Nursing Assistant for a year, but I did not once dump on students. Becuase I knew what it felt like to being new to a hopital settging, for me it was like going to a foriegn country for the first time. The setting it selfe is overwhelming and intimadating.

    I not beating up on the profession of nursing. All I am saying if the profession in it self starting with the ANA would make changes to make nursing more applealing, just maybe this would help with the shortage by attracting new blood and new ideas.

    For me it felt very fustrating spending 5 years in college ( the only reason it took 5 years because of dule majored) and acquire a student loan up to $50,000 only to be treated as a telemarketer your fisrt day. I was lucky to have the military pay for my BSN, but there are ones that are not so lucky. To me first impressions are everyting, what happend on that first day left bad taste in my mouth

    I am the person who treats people like the way I like to be treated and I am also big on respect guy. This is how my family raised me on Texas values. I thought what happed that day was very disrespectful not only to me but to the profession of nursing. And if this has happend to me I garuntee this has happed to a lot other nurses in the USA. I was treated better on my first day of waiting table my freshman year at a local Outback Steakhouse making only $2.50 and hour.

    I know a lot of nurses is going to take this advise personal and thing is I am not anti-nursing. To tell the truth if I had to do it again, I would. This might sound suprising to most of you all in Nursing land. One thing I did enjoy while nursing was pt care. I got chace while working a medical surgical unit along with ecperince in the ER to hone my critical thinking skills and fine tune my assessment capabilities. This will pave the road to making me a great provider in the future.

    Thanks for everyones two cents, good or bad.
    Last edit by thegame on Sep 4, '02
  12. by   fergus51
    Pebbles, I just had to note, a lot of places don't have the option of not placing students on certain "unfriendly" units. I went to a school where nursing enrollment was at the maximum and we had to use every unit in the hospital and still do a lot of juggling to fit us in for our mandatory rotations there.

    When I did my first interviews as a new grad, several asked me what I was looking for in a job. My answer was the most important thing was a supportive environment for new grads. More important than the money, and I have never regretted taking the lower paying, more friendly job. As a new grad I knew I was a burden at times, I just hoped that the more experienced nurses remembered that they started out that way too.
  13. by   pebbles
    I know, fergus, I know. It's not an easy problem.

    We have four brand new grads on our unit.... and we are severely short staffed and poorly managed. They got thrown to the wolves, and I'm pretty sure we are going to scare them off. We have no time to mentor them, we're too busy flying around with our own workload (new grads get buddied for a total of three shifts if they are lucky)... and we ALL feel horrible about it. Instead of getting resentful at the new grads, we get pissed off at our manager for doing this to them (and therefore all of us, because one weak link in the chain is all it takes to affect the workload and the pt care).

    I think a lot of it boils down to management.... creating a healthy work environment for us all. Schools and instructos have no power over most of these factors, and I think the nurses are just as much victims of this maelstrom as the students.
    Last edit by pebbles on Sep 4, '02

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