I think I'm done with nursing. - page 6

by MBrickle

13,670 Visits | 71 Comments

I've had a tough few weeks of self-reflection. My mind has gone back and forth over my preferred career path, and, ultimately, I think I'm going to bow out gracefully. I am a career-change RN. After receiving two bachelor... Read More


  1. 0
    I have been a nurse for almost 13 years and I can tell you it's the best choice I ever made.
    I worked in the hospital for many years and I am soooo glad I came out of that. I do home care now and absolutely love it.
    You can make money doing this (I made over $120,000 for 2012). You don't have to break your back to be a good nurse and make money. There is a future, you just have to figure it out.
    Oh yeah, and I'm just a ASN.















































































































    ou just have to make the right choices and not get stuck into thinking that the hospital is the only place you can make money.
    In this economy places are not looking to train someone from scratch but






    Quote from MBrickle
    I've had a tough few weeks of self-reflection. My mind has gone back and forth over my preferred career path, and, ultimately, I think I'm going to bow out gracefully.

    I am a career-change RN. After receiving two bachelor degrees in non-nursing fields, I realized what I had really known all along - nursing was for me. I worked hard, I worked full time, I put myself through school, I was at the top of my class....andddd...I got a pedi home health job. My ADN isn't worth the paper it's written on in the Northeast.

    THEN, I blew my back out. Massive herniation, 6 months off work, and pain to end all pain. I deal with workers comp, I rehab (luckily no surgery) and I get back to work this past June.

    My DREAM is to be an acute care nurse. I love working with high-acuity and in a fast-paced, think-on-your-feet environment...as someone who as always craved more 'excitement,' this is for me. BUT, I have an ADN. And even with a BSN, hospitals aren't hiring you unless you have previous hospital experience (usually already in the specialty you are trying to break in to,) and you can't get experience of any kind because nobody will hire you to begin with. Add to that a back injury, and I'm further limited to PICU, but preferably NICU as I really do not want to temp fate with my back...and REFUSE a future filled with spinal fusions and all that jazz.

    I tried to convince myself to be an FNP. I even toyed with PA school, but I'm so frustrated by all of the courses that I will have to re-take since I am past my 10 year expiration for most schools.

    I'm frustrated. I would be a STELLAR ICU nurse. I really would. I have fought so hard to get here and it's taken years. I just don't think I have much fight left in me. Moving isn't an option as my husband makes more than double what I do and has a job with a large pay potential.

    It is just so discouraging to see that travel nurses are getting hired all over the place because they are cheaper from every angle. Local nurses need the jobs! I'm just over it at this moment. I am just treading water and getting sick of it. Hard work has officially gotten me nowhere and there is no silver lining in sight.

    Just needed to rant/vent/sulk/express my frustration

    May as well go back to my pre-nursing legal career where I made the same money, didn't have to do nearly as much work, and wasn't in a field that constantly tempted me to do more and be more, but knowing that the goals I have in mind are pretty unattainable.

    :::END PITY PARTY:::
  2. 0
    Quote from MBrickle
    First of all, yes, I have been spending a lot of time pursuing "interests/goals" because pursuing those interests is how I am going to achieve my goals (PALS certification, neonatal resuscitation, BSN, etc.) And in my humble opinion, having goals leads to success in life and helps to direct a path. Sorry if you feel differently. Also, yes, frustration is a part of life, a big one, but I'm sorry that I didn't know that means I can't vent about it? In that case, half the posts on this site shouldn't even be allowed since many of them are the result of ACTUAL NURSES venting about their jobs! I am more than aware of the commitment it takes to achieve my goal, as I was well aware of the commitment it would take to change careers and become a nurse, or the commitment I would need to make to becoming a home care nurse and researching techniques and information on diagnoses, etc. But that doesn't mean that sometimes I cannot feel frustrated that the only thing holding me back from advancing in my self-appointed career path is the economy and the lack of jobs in my area, especially when some nurses are swimming in job offers. That IS frustrating. Especially when I have a bad back from working in home health where the environment is set up for the patient and NOT the nurse (as it should be) and I have nobody to ask for help in repositioning a patient...that limits my job prospects significantly and adds another obstacle.Yes, ultimately the higher goal is to be in a "good" place, but part of that includes job satisfaction as a piece of the whole. For someone so "enlightened" you should take a minute to jump off your high horse...the view is more realistic from down here.
    MBrickle, I'm very sorry to have upset you. In my original response to your post (my second post was not addressing you at all), my intention was to be positive, and to possibly motivate you to remember why you decided to pursue nursing in the first place; perhaps in an effort to help you decide whether or not it was a career worth salvaging. It's unfortunate that you are entitled to an opinion worth posting for the world to see and respond to, but others are limited only to sharing your opinion and not having their own. By all means, leave nursing if you wish. More room for the rest of us. How horrible that your post, in a public forum, fell victim to some random Jane Doe's feedback.
  3. 1
    Quote from Vishwamitr
    Dear VICEDRN, In my hospital, nurses have to do the in-take, get approval from insurance companies (which can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 6 hours), transfer patients out, arrange for follow-up appointments, and arrange for transportation (cab, or ambulance, etc.) They never taught us that in nursing school about 2 decades ago. Is it in the curriculum now?
    That would drive me crazy. I resent those particular roles, but not because I feel I'm above those duties. Nurses all ready have so much on their plate no matter what specialty it seems, u mean to tell me you can't find one person in this economy willing to help. It doesn't require a college education to do a lot of the things dumped on us. Hire a few workers around minimum wage and watch how much money that it saves in the long run. I'm pretty sure staff turn over will decrease.
    anotherone likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    We? Who is we? You are a nursing student. Have you even worked as a nurse's aid? I worked as a sitter for fifteen months and now have two jobs as a PCA (nurse's aid), and let me tell you, nurses have HARD jobs. The TV is broken? Ask the nurse. Wrong food tray? Complain to the nurse. I have chest pain? Talk to the nurse. So much falls onto the nurse, even issues that are not relating to nursing practice, but because healthcare has become a business, nurses are forced to become super nurses and do anything and everything to get great patient satisfaction ratings.Until you have worked out in the field as a nurse or have had lots of healthcare experience working closely with nurses like I have, you are in no position to really comment about the state of nursing. Sorry.
    Lol. I really really wanted to word my comment this way, but decided to hold back a little. I completely agree with you. I too was a sitter and PCT so I knew what I was getting myself into as far as patient and family attitudes and unrealistic expectations from management. However, so many students in my school never worked health care, and I just shook my head sometimes thinking 'they have no idea what they are in for.'
    ThePrincessBride likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from gcupid
    That would drive me crazy. I resent those particular roles, but not because I feel I'm above those duties. Nurses all ready have so much on their plate no matter what specialty it seems, u mean to tell me you can't find one person in this economy willing to help. It doesn't require a college education to do a lot of the things dumped on us. Hire a few workers around minimum wage and watch how much money that it saves in the long run. I'm pretty sure staff turn over will decrease.
    A friend that was an RT told me a while back she went back to school for Radiology because so much of the RT's job was taken from them and given to RN's. She said some of the treatments that were the domain of RT is now done by RN's. She said at first it was great not to have to run all shift. After a while they noticed they were running again because there were now fewer RT's in the hospital.
  6. 1
    Quote from VICEDRN
    I hear ya! Sat in the staff meeting the other day and listened to the manager heap praise on a nurse who "took the initiative" to clean a room when the housekeeper had disappeared. Again. When the manager started in about how we can all take more initiative, I mentally added it to the list of idiotic jobs I do that really someone else is getting paid for: answering phones,administering breathing treatments, social work stuff, etc. I thought nursing will always be a hell hole because rns are a glutton for punishment. They refuse to advance themselves. They insist on having the lowest standard of education possible in health care and are proud of it! Started my applications to grad school. Can't wait to put bedside behind me.
    I'm feel quite sorry for your coworkers. It sounds like you are one of those people who go around saying "that's not my job" instead of helping. I'm by no means a glutton for punishment but if I just discharged someone and have a free sec you bet your hiney I'm cleaning that room! I love my housekeepers and am more than willing to help them out. That's part of being a good thoughtful employee.
    OnlybyHisgraceRN likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from VICEDRN
    I hear ya! Sat in the staff meeting the other day and listened to the manager heap praise on a nurse who "took the initiative" to clean a room when the housekeeper had disappeared. Again. When the manager started in about how we can all take more initiative, I mentally added it to the list of idiotic jobs I do that really someone else is getting paid for: answering phones,administering breathing treatments, social work stuff, etc. I thought nursing will always be a hell hole because rns are a glutton for punishment. They refuse to advance themselves. They insist on having the lowest standard of education possible in health care and are proud of it! Started my applications to grad school. Can't wait to put bedside behind me.
    Lol!!!
    cardiacrocks likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from VICEDRN

    No, they don't teach it. For the record, t bothers me more to do a job someone else is already getting paid and isn't doing then to do something that no one is doing for patient and I haven't been trained to do.
    My thoughts exactly...
  9. 1
    I'm sorry to hear of your situation. I am also frustrated with nursing in general, but I keep telling myself there's light at the end of the tunnel. I started on a small Med-Surg unit in the Southeast. I didn't make good money, I worked my butt off, and honestly I didn't learn a whole lot. I moved to the Northwest where I jumped back into Med-Surg in a larger hospital. Wow. I've learned SO much.. but I still hate my job for the most part. There are many positive aspects of nursing.. Look at how many lives you have influenced, how many lives you may have saved. You may be the only positive person they ever meet. You may be the only person who's ever cared for them and shown them compassion. Those things are what get me up in the morning.. It's not the money, or the absence of "thata girl!"s, or the fact that my bladder, back, and feet ALWAYS hurt, or that I go home feeling defeated more than successful.. It's the little things that keep me in nursing. I completely understand why you want out. Some days I do too. Just make sure you weigh all of your options first. Make sure you've tried new things, new places. You may be surprised to find that something you never anticipated is the right fit for you. If you haven't already, try to find a seasoned nursing friend that you can go to for advice. It helps to talk to someone who's worked in many areas of nursing. Good luck to you. I hope you find the right fit.
    pattylee1122 likes this.
  10. 1
    I didn't read this entire thread, just the original post and a few comments. How long have you been working as a peds home health nurse? It seems a little silly to give up on nursing altogether when you've only had one nursing job. I despised my first 2 RN jobs in acute care (blah, no one could pay me enough to go back to the bedside), until I fell into home health, which was my niche in nursing. I ended up going back to school for a master's degree and now I don't do any direct patient care. I have a full-time job that I absolutely love and I also own my own business on the side. The point being that there are tons of ways to use your nursing degree. Yes, you may need to put in a little bit more time and get the "experience" and you may be better off if you go back to school to get a BSN eventually, but maybe that is just part of the investment that you have to put into making it a career instead of a job. I spent a fortune on my master's degree, but I can't say that I regret it because it has opened up a whole new world of opportunities for me. Nursing is what you make it.
    TheBlackDogWaits likes this.


Top