I really hate going to clinicals - page 2

Here I am on vacation, but already dreading starting school again b/c of clinicals. I've pinpointed a few reasons why I hate them, and I'm hoping someone here can help me out... 1) It's not... Read More

  1. by   S.N. Visit
    [QUOTE= I'm paying very good money for this education and I expect a teacher, not a judge, when I'm at clinical.
    QUOTE]


    That is a classic come-back! I love it :chuckle
  2. by   LPN1974
    I agree with what the last 4 posters all just said. I didn't have to go thru the experience in nursing school of having a bully for an instructor, but I have worked under a one for 20-something years. If it were not having so many years invested on my job I would leave today. However, I have learned to somewhat deal with it, mostly I try to stay out of her way, but in some situations I have called her on her bullying. And she DID back down. She is also an "eye-roller" and I find that very unprofessional.
    She has always had one person to pick on most, but has bullied all of us to some degree. Then she's also had her favorites, too. Her all time favorite was a tattletale and that person was always tattling on others to get her brownie points.
    It just makes me sick to hear about nurses doing this to other nurses, even more so a nursing INSTRUCTOR doing it to students. I have wondered why nursing schools didn't do more to start combating the bully situation while students were students. Now I know why...instructors can be bullies, too.
    Best advice I can offer is not to let her see your fear of her. They THRIVE on that.
  3. by   bookwormom
    Dear Raindrop,

    I graduated in '75, but can identify with your experience. In my case, it was a community health instructor. Looking back, I don't think I was an outstanding student, and I didn't have a clue on how to write a care plan, etc. But it all came together after graduation. I went on to graduate school and am now an instructor myself. My advice: just hang in and do your best. Your goal is not really to please your instructor, but rather to learn nursing. It sounds to me like you are learning, and I urge you to have faith in yourself.

    Sincerely,

    Bookwormom
  4. by   mitchsmom
    Best advice I can offer is not to let her see your fear of her. They THRIVE on that.
    I agree. I have an instructor that preys on scared students who lack confidence or who are weaker in their performance &/or preparation &/or academic work. I was always one of those people when I was younger... if I had done nursing school when I was young I would have cried every day I bet... but I'm older now and I probably have more confidence than the instructor - I think she's more rattled by me than the other way around! That's a laugh when I think about how thin-skinned and underconfident I was at one time! Now my instructor doesn't even spend much time on me compared to the other students because she thinks that I'm ok with everything (and I am for the most part, and seek out her help if I'm not).

    Don't fear her... you KNOW you can do this program and be a good nurse (you DO, right? If you don't then you need to get that firmly set in your mind 100%)... so she is mearly another step in your path. And if you can't make it, fake it... feel it inside or let it out later, but develop a thick skin and don't let her see you sweat. Be prepared at all times, appear confident and unrattled. At an appropriate point, ask her something mundane/conversational, like how her cat is or where she got her PhD to show that you are calm and collected. I know it sounds impossible to do but when you get there you won't look back. And she'll concentrate her time on someone else.
  5. by   Euskadi1946
    Hang in there Raindrop, I had several instructors just like her and was dropped twice from my nursing program but I didn't let that stop me. Trust me, you will be thankful to these instructors when you graduate and you're out on the floors. I had alot of nightmares about nursing school, but I'm grateful for the instructors being such b***hs because they want to make sure they graduate good nurses. If they or one of their familiy members should be fortunate to get you as a nurse someday down the road, they want to make sure that they/they're family members are getting the best care possible and they will because they taught you. You will toughen up and when you're out on the floors you will appreciate it.
  6. by   Soleilpie
    Quote from cecirn
    hang in there raindrop, i had several instructors just like her and was dropped twice from my nursing program but i didn't let that stop me. trust me, you will be thankful to these instructors when you graduate and you're out on the floors. i had alot of nightmares about nursing school, but i'm grateful for the instructors being such b***hs because they want to make sure they graduate good nurses. if they or one of their familiy members should be fortunate to get you as a nurse someday down the road, they want to make sure that they/they're family members are getting the best care possible and they will because they taught you. you will toughen up and when you're out on the floors you will appreciate it.
    granted a person may become tougher after dealing with an instructor with no sense of professionalism, but i think this also perpetuates the bullying environment that continues to exist within the nursing profession. in some cases, this kind of bullying may weaken an already insecure person. it's the instructor's job to teach these nurses a sense of professionalism, not how to survive in a bullying environment. this bullying environment shouldn't even exist and so the goal should be to end it. the start to ending it is by having instructors behave how they want future nurse to behave. in other words, instructors should be role models. if you want to teach students about bullying, then discuss it and let them know that they may encounter less than professional nurses and how to handle them. nursing students are already on an emotional rollercoaster. they don't need an instructor to belittle them on top of it. i seriously doubt this instructor has a legitimate reason for behaving this way. is this the bullying role playing class in disguise?

  7. by   dustydog
    Well said Soleilpie. When I went thru LPN school the instructors were awesome role models. They were professionals thru and thru and held us to high standards but without the abuse and ridicule you hear so much of. It was simply not professional to act in this manner. As such, we were never afraid to approach them or fear intimidation and embarrassment. We learned faster and better without the fear which translated into more productive clinicals. So many of the students I encounter now think that this cruel behavior from instructors is just part of the ritual of becoming a nurse and in most cases just suffer in silence and accept it. I try to imagine the other instructors I've had in my life behaving the way some of these prima donas do and I just can't. They've gotten away with it for so long they may actually think - and have others think that this is an acceptable method of instruction Abuse is abuse and it is unnecessary and wrong.
  8. by   purplemania
    I suggest a conference with her IF she starts this up again this semester. Maybe have it in the presence of another teacher or the Dean. Or go straight to the Dean. The good news is, you are getting practice in dealing with difficult people. So far you have managed to stay afloat and that is a good thing. Your fears are very personal, but sometimes we tend to globalize our fears and let paranoia settle in. Been there and done that. As for the test, take one day at a time. Almost EVERYBODY passes it the first time. Don't worry about it now.
  9. by   jeepgirl
    I use gloves for my IV pushes. It is stupid not to... when you flush during your first saline (SASH), you're aspirating back to see if you get a blood return. you're very very close to an infectious body fluid. i'd sure as heck use gloves. What if that INT cap fell off? Or something became disconnected?

    And what is the problem with using the B/P cuff upside down anyway? All a BP cuff does is use pressure to obliterate blood flow through an artery. The cuffs I have used have an air bladder inside that is centered vertically in the cuff with a little mark to help you center it.

    As long as you have the cuff centered over the artery, its going to blow up, apply pressure, measure the amount of pressure in the cuff and do its job. it's stupid to get pissy over something like that... it looks like she has no critical thinking skills to think through the mechanics of how a manual b/p cuff works. all i can say is "puh - lease".

    The reading should not be different if the bladder of the cuff is upside down or not. heck, if you use it upside down then you're not smacking the patient in the face with the tubing thats connected to the wall.

    now, i don't know about the dinamap ones. but it should not matter while taking a manual b/p. i'd just ignore her and do what she wants while you are forced to be in her clinical. then, when you graduate, hopefully you'll be able to look at what she taught you and be able to pick out what was really important and what was not.

    we all have different styles. but it is my experience that some of these people are just SO picky that they want everything want their way. and they aren't open to different techniques that still fall within the "proper" realm.
    it is control issues, honey! take it at that. as i have learned, people like this are really miserable inside and have internal chaos. so, they try to control others around then. just remind yourself that... and believe it... and you'll be a much happier person!
  10. by   Mystery5
    We had a former clinical instructor hired this year at our facility. There's an old saying, you know, that those that can't do, teach. Well, this lady supposedly had these great credentials. But the story that sticks in my mind is that she was helping in the CCU and needed to get a UA from a Foley. So, she deflated the balloon instead, and accidentally pulled out the cath. Turns out she was RATHER rusty on her real life skills.

    When she was told that she's need more orientation, she got pretty huffy, I'm told, and quit!
  11. by   raindrop
    Thanks alot guys. I printed out all of your responses and I will read them all the time during my clinicals with her.

    I REALLY don't want to report her. There are 3 nursing instructors for my class (including her). They all teach a different area; however, we have clinicals with each and every one of them. We have 3 rotations total per semester. 2 of them are for 4 weeks, the other one is for 6. Blahhhhh. 2 days a week.

    All three of them are very, very close. They've all worked together for eons. They told us on the first day of school that they "communicate with eachother everyday about everything, so, don't you people try to pull any fast ones by us. It won't work. HaHaHa."

    There is one that I really like alot, and I know she likes me, but I just don't feel very comfy talking to her about my problem with Paula. I will DEFINETELY speak up though, to the director, when my rotation is over with her - if I haven't had a TIA that is.

    Anyhow, I will just grin & bear it, and say lots of prayers until then.

    Merry Christmas!
  12. by   BS Nursing Student
    It sounds like your instructor has a problem. I had a clinical instructor who was kicked out of nursing school about 50 years ago, so maybe something in her past is haunting her. Anyway, it's not your problem to solve her problem. Just hang it there, new instructors always come along next semester.
  13. by   Chaya
    Quote from CeCiRN
    Hang in there Raindrop, I had several instructors just like her and was dropped twice from my nursing program but I didn't let that stop me. Trust me, you will be thankful to these instructors when you graduate and you're out on the floors. I had alot of nightmares about nursing school, but I'm grateful for the instructors being such b***hs because they want to make sure they graduate good nurses. If they or one of their familiy members should be fortunate to get you as a nurse someday down the road, they want to make sure that they/they're family members are getting the best care possible and they will because they taught you. You will toughen up and when you're out on the floors you will appreciate it.
    I disagree. There is a world of difference between being tough but fair and just plain being a b****. I attracted that kind of attention from more than one instructor in school five years ago; I now believe it was because of my hesitant and unsure manner. At the time, I told myself it was for my own good and sucked it up. I have since come to realize that this kind of pressure NEVER helped me to learn, or to toughen up, or any of those things they tell you. It just stressed me out more, sometimes to the point of totally blanking out on info I was totally knowledgable of. (No, nothing like that has happened to me on the unit with a patient- only when I had an instructor hovering over me specifically TRYING to trip me up...). This is not the way to help a student become confident OR competent. I have no respect and certainly no thanks for instructors who liken bullying to legitimate instruction. The only positive thing I learned from their negative example was I vowed I would never treat a student, new grad or any other co-worker in this way, and I never have. I am a tough mentor with new orientees but I prefer to let them think a problem through if the situation permits. They seem to be able to come to me with the questions that begin "this is a stupid question but...". I tell them that very few questions are stupid, help them think it through, and we get it resolved once and forever. I now have a number of newer colleagues who are competent, critical thinkers and with whom I share a mutual professional respect.

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