I Put In My Notice!!!...Now what??? - page 2

I could really use some help here! I am an Rn graduate of 8 months now...I started straight out of school on a cardiac/telemetry floor...THEY do not label this floor a step down floor, but we have... Read More

  1. by   gonzo1
    I have several acquaintances I graduated with and they have hopped around multiple jobs, sometimes only staying a couple of days. They never have any trouble getting yet another job. Job hopping is bad, but you should never compromise your integrity or license, they are both hard to earn.
    You have now learned valuable lessons about what to look out for at next job.
    Good luck, you will do fine.
    I have a friend that was thinking of moving to another state so she went looking through a couple of hospitals while on vacation. She was dressed in tank top, cutoff shorts and flip/flops and walked out of each facility with job offers after being approached (they thought she was loitering). So it isn't hard to get a job in most places.
  2. by   traumaRUs
    I too have done the "lets look around while on vacation" routine. I have been offered jobs every single time too and they are asking when I can start! lol
  3. by   msmel321
    Thanks for the replys so far....
    As far as how I have handled this situation...I have told my NM, many times of my concerns with the ratio, which is usually the times that 3 nurses will be scheduled, then it goes back to the usual 2.She has also told me that I can always ask someone from the unit for help!She has told me many times that they are working on the staffing, and I have heard thru the grapevine that they have hired 2 new graduates to fill these positions.This staffing problem is a management problem and has been going on for over a year now.Our floor is connected to the CCU and as of next week there will have been 9(from the floor and the unit) that have left due to this same issue.I love cardiac nursing,but this is not an issue that will be resolved quickly.As far as burning bridges, I did put in my resignation letter a request to stay PRN, so as not to totally cut all ties.Which may sound dumb, but I do love this floor.I also thought it may sound better when applying for another posistion.Am I wrong?
    I may have pulled the plug too soon, but my big concern is how this will affect being hired elsewhere.Will they look at me as a quitter?
  4. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from msmel321
    Thanks for the replys so far....
    As far as how I have handled this situation...I have told my NM, many times of my concerns with the ratio, which is usually the times that 3 nurses will be scheduled, then it goes back to the usual 2.She has also told me that I can always ask someone from the unit for help!She has told me many times that they are working on the staffing, and I have heard thru the grapevine that they have hired 2 new graduates to fill these positions.This staffing problem is a management problem and has been going on for over a year now.Our floor is connected to the CCU and as of next week there will have been 9(from the floor and the unit) that have left due to this same issue.I love cardiac nursing,but this is not an issue that will be resolved quickly.As far as burning bridges, I did put in my resignation letter a request to stay PRN, so as not to totally cut all ties.Which may sound dumb, but I do love this floor.I also thought it may sound better when applying for another posistion.Am I wrong?
    I may have pulled the plug too soon, but my big concern is how this will affect being hired elsewhere.Will they look at me as a quitter?
    It shouldn't affect your ability to get a job at all. Constant nursing movement is a CONSEQUENCE of hospital mismanagement. They are all saavy enough to know that they have to deal with problems of their own making. That means a constant level of transient f/t staff.

    Believe me, as you cited, it's an everyday occurance for HR managers. From both sides of the picture: recruiting AND retaining.

    Firm up your resume, interview smartly, and you'll have a job almost immediately.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  5. by   gonzo1
    Kind of reminds me of trips to Mexico in the shopping districts when they follow you down the street lowering the prices of goods till you can't resist buying. I have a little picture in my head of recruiters following me down the hallway offereing ever better salaries.
    It's almost to the point where you don't dare even inquire about a job unless you are really sure you want it because you just know they are gonna give you a job offer.
  6. by   msmel321
    As far as the job offers jumping at you....I am in SE Alabama and not alot of choices really...but the wall I keep coming up against is everywhere seems to want at least one year experience.Where were you getting all of your offers from?...Also, I don't know if I mentioned, but I am 47.So I hope that won't play a part in getting a new job!
  7. by   lovinghands
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA

    Remember this: being a good nurse is NOT always the same as being a good employee. And you - you are a nurse first.
    Great quote!
  8. by   cookie102
    well you followed the chain of command, there isn't much you can do after that, you did what you feel is the right thing, that patient ratio is terrible, these are acutely ill patients, not chronics....i am a nsg supervior in home health and i am in need of a RN , and 8 months of cardiac experience would be great. we do 90% of the things they do in the hospital at home. so don't worry about getting a job. and the fact that you are 47 to me is a plus!!
  9. by   msmel321
    cookie102...Thanks so much .....you really boosted my spirits..Home health is actually an avenue I had thought about.....but,again I was told 1 yr experience..but I will keep looking with other companies. Are you in Alabama?....I would think home health could afford me more 1 on 1 time with patients if the time is managed well.
  10. by   lannisz
    Don't worry. You absolutely did the right thing! Isn't it ironic that 8 months of experience was considered adequate enough for you to handle 8 or more patients of severe acuity almost single handedly at night? Don't worry about the one year thing...or your age. You have showed maturity and wisdom by leaving. Now, take time to think about where you want to go next. You already have valuable experience even if you don't realize it. Be honest in your interviews about why you left. The right manager will see your leaving that situation as a good thing. And please, pay no attention to that second poster who thinks "20 years of corporate experience" is relevant to the nursing world. Things are very different in Nursing.
    Last edit by lannisz on Aug 26, '06
  11. by   HyperRNRachel
    Quote from maryshome8
    I'm a pre-nursing student...but I have over 20 years of Corporate working experience, and hospitals are a business like any other, complete with their corporate and administrative headaches.

    I'll be brutally honest here, I think you pulled the plug too soon.

    As a new graduate, even though your current situation is very difficult, future hospitals may look at it as you 'can't handle' the stress of nursing.

    It is always, always better to look for a job when you already have one. This is no matter what profession you are working in.

    I don't think your license is in jeapardy because 8/1 ratio in post-op is ridiculous, and it's the hospital that is responsible for staffing, not you. Let's say you had two life-threatening situations to occur with your patients in two different rooms at once...do you feel a license review board would think you could be at two places at the same time, or would they take a good hard look at the staffing?

    The hospital is CLEARLY cutting the staffing cord too short with only 2 RN's for 16 patients.

    There is a serious difference between not being adequately staffed (for comfort) and being critically short staffed (before patient care starts to suffer).

    I feel sorry for the patients at this hospital, because they are not getting the care they deserve, and with post-op, I think their lives are at risk.
    Please tell me you are joking!
  12. by   neetnik461
    [FONT=Arial Narrow]I would think maryshome8 is probably ready to have second thoughts about going into nursing after being chewed alive on this post. Let's cut her a break . . .she gave the best advice she could from a corporate view . . let it be already!!

    [FONT=Arial Narrow]Otherwise, to msmel 321, I'm 45 and have just decided to leave my first RN job after 10 months (for different reasons than yourself). I wondered how important the 1 year experience would be also. Went to an RN open house last week and have been offered a job no problem. My sister, who has been a nurse for 18 years, gave me a few good pieces of advice I thought I would pass along:
    • [FONT=Arial Narrow]Don't badmouth the job you are leaving. Come from the angle of loving your current job and being torn about leaving, but staffing issues are a concern.
    • [FONT=Arial Narrow]Dress very professional and conservative at interviews and bring a resume with you. My sister swears by the "power suit". Some of you may disagree and with the job market the way it is I'm sure employers will hire RN's in jeans/t-shirt, but why not put your very best foot forward and give yourself every advantage for the best job offer possible?
    • [FONT=Arial Narrow]Play the "cheerleader". When getting a tour of the floor make sure you express a lot of ooh's and ahh's about whatever you can. " I love the way this floor is set-up", "Your computer charting program is impressive" etc., etc.
    • [FONT=Arial Narrow]Be careful of coming off as if you are just "shopping around" for a job. A lot of managers are offended by this. Make it seem that this is the job you really want to have (even if in your mind you are thinking . . .no way!).
    [FONT=Arial Narrow]These tips have worked great for me, I had 3 simultaneous job offers right out of school. Yeah, I was way overdressed at the RN open house in my power suit, pumps and leather portfolio. Every other attendee I saw had on khaki's and casual tops, but the HR rep. told me in a phone call yesterday that the nurse manager was "all over her back" to get an offer in the works . . .as soon as I walked out the door!!

    [FONT=Arial Narrow]I'm sure it can work out the same for you too . . . good luck!!!!
  13. by   maryshome8
    Quote from Elisheva
    Nursing school is a WORLD away from reality nursing. Just wait.

    I stuck it out for two years on a busy med-surg floor. I wish I'd just admitted that it wasn't for me sooner and looked for something else. As a result, I stayed out of nursing for many years. I'm taking a refresher course to return soon.

    Nursing is the one career where changing jobs is completely acceptable, although I think staying a year is probably preferable. However, I won't put myself or my patients in an unsafe situation just to finish out a year.

    Althought medicine is definitely a business, there's no comparision to a job in nursing and a job in the "corporate" world. I know because I've done both.

    Hang on to your hat, Maryshome
    All I was trying to say is that the reason her employment situation is so bad , and she is overloaded, is because some hospitals are making decisions based on business and profit and they are forgetting that there are real people sitting in those beds that are in pain, uncomfortable, may need immediate attention, monitoring, etc. 1/8 doesn't quite get them the care they deserve...and pay for.

    I wasn't in any way trying to compare NURSING to a corporate job, just that some hospital administrations treat it too much like one, and that is where the problem lies and why so many good nurses are leaving hospitals. Administration sometimes forgets exactly what it's "commodity" is...the comfort and safety of patients. Patients are people..not a number on an insurance card.

    There is obviously, no substitution for being responsible for someone'e life.

    I apologize if I wasn't more clear.

    I don't mind being corrected or disagreed with...I just wished some folks (not you) would keep it professional because some of the comments that were made were 100% uncalled for and just plain nasty. i totally respect everyone has "hot button" issues...but I think we can disagree and still be civil.
    Last edit by maryshome8 on Oct 1, '06

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