I need advise - page 2

Hi, I really love this forum. I have read a lot of threads and posting that I can relate to. I guess my dilemma would be.....Well, I've always heard horror stories about how Doctors treat Nurses at... Read More

  1. by   saskrn
    Quote from future nurse jess
    Of course, you're right. I didn't even get that from the above post that the order was a "stat" one.

    In past jobs, when there was an inappropriate interchange betwen co-workers *in front of a customer/client* I certainly could see waiting to discuss it till in private. I wonder, though, what that says to patients when they see nurses silently taking crap from MDs and not knowing if the nurse ever followed up and confronted the doc? Doesn't it just reinforce the idea that nurses can be treated poorly- by docs, patients, families, etc? What if - in a non stat situation of course- the doc makes a rude comment/request in front of a patient- and the nurse asks him to step outside to discuss? That way the patient is clued into the fact that the nurse is not about to be spoken to that way and the doc knows that the patient knows he's been "called out" on his poor behavior?

    I'm sorry if I'm beating a dead horse here- and I know nursing is all about patient care and their needs, etc- but I don't see how it does anyone nurses, patients, or docs a service by letting that kind of behavior stand and just dealing with it later.

    Am I way off base here?
    In my experience, whenever an MD acts inappropriately towards a nurse, in front of a patient, the MD still looks like an a$$. I've only experienced this once or twice, but I remember the patient commenting on how the MD was a jerk. Once I confronted the MD, told him to make up his mind, and never do that to me again. I apparently made my point because he was afraid to come near me afterwards. lol

    I actually believe, though, conflict in front of a patient for any reason is a no-no.
  2. by   Jess RN
    Once I confronted the MD, told him to make up his mind, and never do that to me again. I apparently made my point because he was afraid to come near me afterwards. lol
    Nice! LOL

    My husband worries that I'll have trouble "taking orders from rude men- especially residents- and particularly once you have been a nurse for a while and probably will know more then they do!" I have to say I worry about the same thing some days...
  3. by   saskrn
    Quote from future nurse jess
    Nice! LOL

    My husband worries that I'll have trouble "taking orders from rude men- especially residents- and particularly once you have been a nurse for a while and probably will know more then they do!" I have to say I worry about the same thing some days...

    lol

    Residents are easy, just threaten to call the Attending.
  4. by   Jess RN
    Quote from saskrn
    lol

    Residents are easy, just threaten to call the Attending.
    I love it!
  5. by   nesher
    What has always helped me is the role we as nurses play as patient advocate. What matters most is their needs, not a doc's ego or your fear. Your patient needs you to speak for them.
    You know what kills rudeness in its tracks - kindness...
    This line of thinking has been of use to me...
  6. by   CHATSDALE
    several years ago there was the certain doctor who could be very rude...he was a foreign md and he was always on the defensive about whether the americans could understand what he was talking about...much was understanbable,,better his writing by a long shot,
    he could be very rude to certanin nurses about issues that did not concern the medical field ie one example...he was leaving icu where somepart of his order was left or something don't know th particulat..amd he yelled at them, calling the nurses incaring and rude...
    the funny things were that because he was a competent m d every one wo know him respected.he was the type yo u would want to work on you if you coded there were those who loved him and those who hateed hem but very few with no opionon choose your battle carefully and yu will nevr find life dull
  7. by   Tweety
    Forget the docs, it's your coworkers, management, patients, patient's families that are going to give you the most grief that first year. Doctors are low on the list of aggravating persons.

    There are a couple of docs here that are just flat out miserable people. But there are also dozens that are fine. Don't let the trolls bother you.

    Let them know what you need. If they are angry deal with the issue, not their anger. If they are unprofressional, walk away.

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