I just love CODES!. . . Not!

  1. Let's face it, I am not a glutton for punishment. I dread to hear the dreaded "code blue in room 302" overhead; I panic and loose all compass to the situation at hand, nurses scurrying and a doctor barking orders...Call me a fool to have ever entered the nursing profession, but I sometimes feel like coding during a code LOL

    PS. Call me a thief, but I took liberties and stole this theme from a wise OP at the male nurse forum.
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Feb 17, '07
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    {{{Tele}}}


    Deeeeeeep breath, girlfriend!!
  4. by   Antikigirl
    When I learned about codes it was in an ALF where all the sudden I was the only person to get things started till paramedics arrived. Needless to say it was pretty much trial by fire. Thankfully I did marry a paramedic and had heard so many stories that after my first time, I really wasn't too stressed out about them anymore.

    I don't know what it is really...I just kinda go into 'code mode', not quite an automatic pilot, but just...well nothing else is happening at all except that code in my mind. That tends to help me. Also realizing that if someone is not breathing, and has no pulse...they are dead, so whatever you do to bring them back is one heck of a big bonus! I mean, I only know of one other being that has ever truely done that..LOL! .

    But wow, after a code, my adreniline is up so high I think I may start throwing some PVC's of my own! LOL! It is hard to continue working on other patients when all I can think about is that code and going over it in my mind to make sure I did my part right and helped others on theirs. And well...I tend to also have a smile a mile long after a code (if sucessful) and people must wonder "what is she thinking?"....LOL!

    I am lucky we don't have many codes on our floor (med/surge ortho), but strokes are something we have to watch for carefully...to bad the signs and symptoms of that aren't typically as clear as most of the pre-code symptoms I have seen. Strokes...now that one scares me since there is virtually nothing I can do but get them down to ICU to start immediate treatments and scans. I kinda feel less involved and helpful in those cases like I do cardiopulmonary codes. (I know I am very important by simply seeing the signs and getting help fast...but you know what I mean...).

    THe last code (last week) the poor nurse had JUST been in the pts room and he was fine, then two minutes later she returned with some bed bath supplies and the dude was grey! She called the rapid responce team and I came running to help. First thing I saw was the typcial open mouth no breather, and greyish blue all over....I said "oh no sweety, call the code, this is a dead dude!". I hit the button, freed his IV line, got the bed into CPR mode, and jumped on and started compressions even before the code cart got there..and it was three rooms away! LOL! HE LIVED! But everyone joked about how matter of fact I was when I said so calmly "dead dude"...they said, it certainly stated the point...got action going...and allowed for some giggle time after we were done. LOL!~
  5. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from TriageRN_34
    When I learned about codes it was in an ALF where all the sudden I was the only person to get things started till paramedics arrived. Needless to say it was pretty much trial by fire. Thankfully I did marry a paramedic and had heard so many stories that after my first time, I really wasn't too stressed out about them anymore.

    I don't know what it is really...I just kinda go into 'code mode', not quite an automatic pilot, but just...well nothing else is happening at all except that code in my mind. That tends to help me. Also realizing that if someone is not breathing, and has no pulse...they are dead, so whatever you do to bring them back is one heck of a big bonus! I mean, I only know of one other being that has ever truely done that..LOL! .

    But wow, after a code, my adreniline is up so high I think I may start throwing some PVC's of my own! LOL! It is hard to continue working on other patients when all I can think about is that code and going over it in my mind to make sure I did my part right and helped others on theirs. And well...I tend to also have a smile a mile long after a code (if sucessful) and people must wonder "what is she thinking?"....LOL!

    I am lucky we don't have many codes on our floor (med/surge ortho), but strokes are something we have to watch for carefully...to bad the signs and symptoms of that aren't typically as clear as most of the pre-code symptoms I have seen. Strokes...now that one scares me since there is virtually nothing I can do but get them down to ICU to start immediate treatments and scans. I kinda feel less involved and helpful in those cases like I do cardiopulmonary codes. (I know I am very important by simply seeing the signs and getting help fast...but you know what I mean...).

    THe last code (last week) the poor nurse had JUST been in the pts room and he was fine, then two minutes later she returned with some bed bath supplies and the dude was grey! She called the rapid responce team and I came running to help. First thing I saw was the typcial open mouth no breather, and greyish blue all over....I said "oh no sweety, call the code, this is a dead dude!". I hit the button, freed his IV line, got the bed into CPR mode, and jumped on and started compressions even before the code cart got there..and it was three rooms away! LOL! HE LIVED! But everyone joked about how matter of fact I was when I said so calmly "dead dude"...they said, it certainly stated the point...got action going...and allowed for some giggle time after we were done. LOL!~
    Thank you TriageNurse...

    I truely plea for more understanding to handle codes with ease...and I envy your having a code expert in your family. Thanks for turning my vent around to a teaching opportunity; however, I may in future need to be defibbed, intubated, and rushed down to ICU after my next code situation...because it's so much stress!!! And so much so I need to cut it with a butter knife!
  6. by   blueheaven
    When I was a younger nurse, code blues used to freak me out too! I worked on a tele floor so we had our fair share. The take a deep breath thingy works! If anything else, go grab the clip board and start recording and observing. Hopefully in your facility you will see some well ran codes that aren't all crazy and see the logic and process in everything that is going on. Some times if you see a downward trend, you can go over what to do, the ABCs. Make sure your room has an ambu bag, airway, suction etc. to that when the time comes there isn't all the drama. Takes time, triage and tazzi always has good advice! ((((((((all of ya))))))))) My coworkers knew that if I calmly said "Oh, ****"....it was time to call a code.
    Last edit by blueheaven on Feb 17, '07 : Reason: it needed it
  7. by   wonderbee
    Having to run codes was one of the reasons I left critical care. We would take turns as code responder. I realized that at 52 and having bad knees, running with the code bag up and down stairs was impractical and put patients at risk. You gotta be able to move fast.
  8. by   muffie
    we run our own codes

    i usually grab the cart, grab the document and bark stuff at everybody else
  9. by   piper_for_hire
    codes were fun for a while but after my first dozen or so it just got to be routine.

    -S
  10. by   Rabid Badger
    I enjoy working codes, but dammit, why do they always happen at shift change?
  11. by   piper_for_hire
    That's because someone is finally assessing that patient! Every time I was on code call I knew I would catch 2 or 3 during the time I should be giving report.
  12. by   tatgirl
    In LTC we do our own codes. I had one Friday nite. I was eating my dinner and one of my CNA's comes up to me and says "Miss so and so doesnt look like they're breatihing". I jump up and run to the room. Nope she aint breathing and no pulse, start cpr and scream for a code blue to be paged, bring the crash cart. Ems was called, and in the 15 minutes it took them to get here we did cpr. Ems arrives and kicks all of us nurses out of the room and they work on her for about 20 minutes, and take her to the er. I get a call from the hosp that sadly she didnt make it. I have bee involved in codes before, but this was my first time doing cpr. I just went into autopilot .

    Wendy

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