I have a surname. I'd like to use it. - page 3

At the hospital at which I'm planning to work, Nurses' name tags say (in big letters) SUSAN and in little letters below that... Smith, RN. Consequently nurses are called by their first names just... Read More

  1. by   ZASHAGALKA
    But see, not using your last name as a protective issue is a ruse.

    Look, somebody forcused enough to employ extreme measures to find where you live doesn't have to jump through all that many more hoops to find your last name. They just have to exercise their right to review their chart. It's right there, in black and white.

    If somebody is THAT motivated, not having your last name on your tag or not using it in your practice isn't going to stop them.

    In the meantime, to "protect" us in ways that really don't protect us at all, we are selling our professionalism.

    Language and the way we communicate means somthing. Dr. Smith and nurse sally is a communication structure that say oodles about the state of nursing today.

    Not only are we being shown are place, we are readily, eagerly staking it out.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  2. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    But see, not using your last name as a protective issue is a ruse.

    Look, somebody forcused enough to employ extreme measures to find where you live doesn't have to jump through all that many more hoops to find your last name. They just have to exercise their right to review their chart. It's right there, in black and white.

    If somebody is THAT motivated, not having your last name on your tag or not using it in your practice isn't going to stop them.

    In the meantime, to "protect" us in ways that really don't protect us at all, we are selling our professionalism.

    Language and the way we communicate means somthing. Dr. Smith and nurse sally is a communication structure that say oodles about the state of nursing today.

    Not only are we being shown are place, we are readily, eagerly staking it out.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    An out-of-control visitor, family member (or anyone else that may have to be removed from the premises by security) would NOT have access to the medical record.
  3. by   Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Nurse 'Smith'

    Or Mr. 'Smith'

    for me.





    Thank you.
  4. by   fergus51
    Quote from RN4NICU
    An out-of-control visitor, family member (or anyone else that may have to be removed from the premises by security) would NOT have access to the medical record.
    True, but they know where you work. They just have to wait for you to leave the hospital. Unfortunately that's the reality of life today.

    I have had the siblings of my patients call me by my first name and title because their parents don't allow them to call adults by just their first name. I thought it was sweet. The other nurses called me Miss Tracy for a few shifts:chuckle

    This is an individual choice and I have never seen someone be called by their surname if they introduce themselves by their first name or vice versa.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from fergus51
    True, but they know where you work. They just have to wait for you to leave the hospital. Unfortunately that's the reality of life today.

    I have had the siblings of my patients call me by my first name and title because their parents don't allow them to call adults by just their first name. I thought it was sweet. The other nurses called me Miss Tracy for a few shifts:chuckle

    This is an individual choice and I have never seen someone be called by their surname if they introduce themselves by their first name or vice versa.
    I think your last paragraph should sum it up.

    This IS an individual choice.

    I don't want to be called "Nurse Last Name" . . . . too reminiscent of

    Nurse Goodbody

    Which I've heard and hate . . . . .

    steph
  6. by   SouthernLPN2RN
    I've always used my first name. I call pts by their first names as well if I have their permission. I also think it's better when trying to arouse someone who's been sedated or is having changes in LOC to address them by their first names. If nothing else, they can wake up and cuss me out for not choosing the appropriate name, lol!!!
  7. by   fergus51
    Quote from stevielynn
    I think your last paragraph should sum it up.

    This IS an individual choice.

    I don't want to be called "Nurse Last Name" . . . . too reminiscent of

    Nurse Goodbody

    Which I've heard and hate . . . . .

    steph
    :chuckle It makes me think of Nurse Ratched. But, like I said if someone else considers using last names as a sign of respect I would consider it disrespectful for them to call me only by my first name. Those are the people who call me Miss X or Nurse X.
  8. by   artistnurse
    If the other staff are called by their surnames. The housekeeping staff should be also. Beyond titles each person is just that-a person, everyone deserves the same respect, regardless of occupation.
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from fergus51
    :chuckle It makes me think of Nurse Ratched. But, like I said if someone else considers using last names as a sign of respect I would consider it disrespectful for them to call me only by my first name. Those are the people who call me Miss X or Nurse X.
    Well, that rarely happens. There is one guy who walks to the hospital every day - one of our cardiac rehab graduates. He visits the LTC folks. He always says "Hi, Mrs. Last Name" to me. Cracks me up. But I wouldn't change it.

    steph
  10. by   Daytonite
    Our hospital permits us to put the name that we want to be called in the large letters on our name tag. Our full name is printed down near to bottom in much smaller print (state law). I know a couple of nurses that like being called by their last name only (an old practice).
  11. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from fergus51
    True, but they know where you work. They just have to wait for you to leave the hospital. Unfortunately that's the reality of life today.

    I have had the siblings of my patients call me by my first name and title because their parents don't allow them to call adults by just their first name. I thought it was sweet. The other nurses called me Miss Tracy for a few shifts:chuckle

    This is an individual choice and I have never seen someone be called by their surname if they introduce themselves by their first name or vice versa.
    yeah- i had a really sweet 11 year old boy in last week who called me 'miss rachel', as did his brother. i thought it was cute- he also said 'yes ma'am, no ma'am' when he answered me.

    then again, several of the nurses introduce themselves to their patients (remember this is peds) as 'miss susie'....they refer to each other this way when talking to the kids ('miss karen is your nurse today, so you have to ask her if you can go to the playroom'). it's perfectly fine, but makes me think of my dance teachers as a kid, who all went by 'miss first-name'. i hear that title and want to go get my tap shoes out.

    funny what associations we each have with certain honorifics.

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