I have a real problem with ancillary staff and am at my wits end. I need help. - page 3

I hesitate to submit this issue, as I know that most Techs, Aides, and HUCS are dedicated and professional, and that I could NOT do my job without these coworkers. Therein lies the problem. On the... Read More

  1. by   HurdYou
    What BSNbedone said. Document, document, document. Have concrete proof of their lack of everything for the next time you bring it up. And like has been said, move it up the chain of command. Is there anyone else willing to support your efforts for change with these two? There is strength in numbers as they say so get as many nurses and even other techs behind you and take it to leadership. I'll bet they can't ignore you then. Good luck and keep us posted.
  2. by   maporcrn1
    I work in a similar environment. I need/want someone (support staff) to do a specific task at a specific time. I do not hesitate to interrupt 'social conversations' to ask the support person to perform the necessary task. Usually, the support person acknowledges my request and acts accordingly. Support personnel are often at the mercy of professional staff. They clean, stock and are expected to respond to requests by multiple staff. I will do the task myself if I know that they are busy helping others. Some professional staff are more than willing to wait for the support staff to perform the task. I am not defending the support persons who chose to defer work, but appreciate those who try to respond to multiple requests.
  3. by   EricaAngela90
    You could go to HR but make sure to point out that their behavior is unprofessional and against your hospitals code of conduct.
  4. by   Proverbs16:24
    OP, sorry you are going through this. I've learned that getting to know your team during orientation is very important to understand each team role and where you fit in. There is nothing like having trust and support among each other. It was a learning experience.
  5. by   billswife
    Quote from maporcrn1
    I work in a similar environment. I need/want someone (support staff) to do a specific task at a specific time. I do not hesitate to interrupt 'social conversations' to ask the support person to perform the necessary task. Usually, the support person acknowledges my request and acts accordingly. Support personnel are often at the mercy of professional staff. They clean, stock and are expected to respond to requests by multiple staff. I will do the task myself if I know that they are busy helping others. Some professional staff are more than willing to wait for the support staff to perform the task. I am not defending the support persons who chose to defer work, but appreciate those who try to respond to multiple requests.

    Exactly! Most of our support staff act in a professional manner. They are self-directed. They do their jobs without prompting and see are a joy to work with.
  6. by   rn&run
    Ick, gross behavior. I second the sexual harassment complaint idea, specifically in that it is creating a hostile work environment for you, uncomfortable enough that you are struggling to do your job. If you have to play up the image of being a prude, fine. You know, and we know, that that's not the real reason, but your company doesn't need to know. Nothing lights the fire under HR like a sexual harassment complaint. I speak from experience. I work in the OR, and things can get pretty crass. I value my docs and coworkers enough not to make a stink every time I get uncomfortable -- usually I just make a joke and with a smile say "and...now I'm uncomfortable," and the conversation moves on. However, I successfully used the sexual harassment card to get out of ever having to work again with a surgeon who truly crossed the line every day, in every case. HR bent over backwards, at the snap of my fingers, to avoid a harassment suit. If you get moved to a less desirable shift or unit as a result of your complaint, that constitutes retaliation, from which you are legally protected. Document document document your evidence. Hopefully your flirty secretary is indiscreet enough to say something inappropriate, in which case you'll be all over it. Good luck!
  7. by   lnvitale
    I agree with those who have suggested to write up and go up the chain of command. When you write her up, leave out the bit about throwing herself at doctors. Be really short and to the point. A list is fine. 1. I asked her to do X. 2. She told me she did X. 3. I checked, and X was not done. 4. I asked why X was not done, she did not answer my question and walked away. Learn to take out the extraneous information, and you have a better chance of really being heard. Better to hand in 10 half page write ups then three 4 page write ups.
  8. by   cwentworth
    Annoying character flaws are one thing, this is something else! We all have to get along to work together, but when patient care is involved, the severity rises to a whole new level. A critical care unit does not and should not offer the opportunity for this outrageous behavior. I may think differently if you were talking about an outpatient practice or different setting. It is beyond inappropriate and the relational dynamics may be enabling this to continue. Our hospital has a "see something, say something", which is an anonymous reporting method. It is obvious that you have tried to rectify this through appropriate channels, now it is time to go a step further. I may reach out to patient care services or your hospital ethics committee. It certainly is a good learning/training opportunity for your fellow co-workers. So glad you shared!
  9. by   fawnmarie
    I just want to say that I'm sorry you have to put up with such unprofessional behavior. Are these unit clerks related to someone in a high position? A nurse manager at one dysfunctional facility where I once worked shared with me his frustration at having a lazy, gossipy unit clerk. This clerk would blatantly sit at the computer and plan her upcoming wedding while MD's orders piled up, phones rang off the hooks, and unit supplies went unordered. Ultimately, the nurse manager asked the DON if she wanted him to give the unit clerk an honest performance evaluation, which would have been an unfavorable evaluation. The DON advised the unit manager to "save trouble" and "not cause any problems" and just give the unit clerk a good evaluation. Why? The lazy unit clerk happened to be the sister of the assistant DON. Both had worked in the facility for more than 10 years, and the clerk knew that she was above reproach because of her sister's status as assistant ADON. That nurse manager would soon move on to another job when he realized that he couldn't effectively manage his unit.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    IF this is tolerated and has been by management, good luck. You are in a toxic environment. I would bring it to their attention but if they are disinclined to fix it, you are going to be the one with the problem. In such a case you will need to move on.

    Try the suggestions above. If nothing changes, move on and get out.
  11. by   quazar
    Quote from Wuzzie
    One tactic I have had success with (although it's not the best way to make friends) is to, in a clear, calm voice so that others can witness, state "Suzie, I have asked you to do such and such. It is part of your job. Are you officially refusing to do it?" If they say yes then I immediately pull out a write-up form but usually it never gets that far because they don't want to look like a fool in front of an audience. Do this a few times and the problem usually gets solved but they won't be friendly about it.
    Oh that's freaking brilliant. LOVE IT.
  12. by   SaltySarcasticSally
    Usually, I would defintely advocate for discussing this with the HUC just the two of you since I like to approach work issues with co-workers this way isntead of going to management. BUT here is the deal you already know, upper managment knows they do not do their job. They always do but because of personal feelings, connections, whatever, they are not going to do anything about it. So, your going to have to get a new job.

    I recently started a PRN job in an ambulatory care center last winter. I have already move onto a different location in the same organization because their clinic staff just did not do their job. They sat on their butts all day while the 2-3 of us who do have work ethic ran circles around them. The office manager knew, we got along great, but there was just nothing she could do about it. I'm not fighting that battle because I have yet to see anyone win that one, plus don't have time for that, and I professionally made my exit.

    I have yet to understand why managers continuously let staff who do not work continue to do. It just makes no sense to me. They are like plagues that infiltrate the unit, destroy team morale, and everyone leaves -- except the offender who year after year is still sitting on their butt.

    Save yourself the stress and anger friend, move on, perhaps a change in environment may end up be a great move for you. I myself am trying to figure out how to work with people who are lazy without being irritated about it so I will be following this to get tips of my own to use in the future.
  13. by   Paws2people
    Out of curiosity, is this a Union job? I've noticed at these places, dead weight staff is in a higher abundance.

    My hospital is a Union, and yes, we have many employees like this. No one wants to work with them, however they also have many "friends" and they stick together. These people know how to finesse the system, and know all the ins and outs. Hurt your hand? They say it happened at work and go out on comp. Nurse X reports you? It must be racial. They are always friendly and familiar with the Union reps in the office. Mostly because of all their time spent whining to them.

    One thing that has always irked me is that because they stink, nurses expect less from them. This causes me to have to work harder to pick up their slack. Many nurses won't even ask them to do anything because it's a hopeless case, so I'm there to fall back on.

    It's unfair to ask me because they are useless, and even more unfair for a nurse to work harder because they aren't reliable.

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