I HATE nursing! (long) - page 8

I really really really need some nurses' advice. So I've realized something about myself lately...I hate nursing. I think I always knew this in college, but I guess I thought things would get better... Read More

  1. Visit  rngolfer53} profile page
    2
    Quote from jjjoy
    How were able to get these jobs, be able to function in them, and get the respect of clinical colleagues without having the requisite at least a "few years" of bedside floor nursing experience? Thanks!

    Good question. As to getting hired, I'm older, in my 50s, which I think people see as indicating stability and good work habits, which I have and references will confirm it. I rarely get sick, and I don't take "mental health" days. When I need time off, I schedule it as far in advance as possible.

    I have some background in EMS, so I already had decent assessment skills. I don't panic easily and I can work in the field without a lot of direction. In interviews, I always made it plain that I would need a longer orientation because I lacked the skills from bedside care.

    No question there are nurses with more knowledge and better skills at procedures than me, but pre-transplant and hospice after-hours visits don't require as broad a range of those. Fortunately, hospice is in many ways a matter of being present and supportive to people in a time of great stress to them. That fits my strengths.

    I have always enjoyed learning, so I spend a lot of time reading journal articles, books, etc on my field. I think people recognize that I work to know as much as I can, and they are thus willing to help me translate print to real life. A curious nature is a boon in any field.

    What I've found is that the way to get colleagues to respect you is to pull your weight, and a little more. Be on time and ready to go so no one has to stay late to cover for you. Stick around past the end of your shift when a family needs support, wake the doctor in the middle of the night to get an order rather than leave it for the next shift. A phone call to update a case manager about what happened to the patient overnight, rather than just putting it in the computer for them to find.

    When you screw up, do it in a novel way, rather than the same way you screwed up last week. This can take some imagination. :chuckle

    And oh yes. Did I mention a bombproof sense of humor, which it never hurts to aim at yourself?

    Reading over the above makes me rather embarrassed at tooting my own horn, but that's my honest eval of what works for me.

    Most of it is just the personality I was born with, shaped by the way my parents raised me.
    Last edit by rngolfer53 on Jan 16, '09
    NRSKarenRN and dianah like this.
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  3. Visit  carebear01} profile page
    0
    Thank you for posting your feelings. I totally understand how you feel. I graduated a little over a year ago, and I can't stand going to my job due to my anxiety level. I'm working towards becoming a Nurse Practitioner and am going to shadow a current NP to make sure that I am not making a mistake. Anyway, I really do understand how you feel. I consider myself an excellent nurse but I'm tired of wondering what family member is going to tear me apart because they are upset about something that I didn't even do. I know that I am not fit to be a staff nurse on the floor, not because of incompetence or anything, but because I feel that it is damaging to my mental and physical health. I wish you the best and just keep remembering that it is only temporary. Keep going to school and eventually you will find a position that you like. In the meantime, keep searching for jobs and you will find one!!!!! Good luck!
  4. Visit  SuperPsychdRN} profile page
    0
    Find an area of Nursing that you love. Sounds like where you are at now isn't a good fit. Best wishes...
  5. Visit  artistnurse} profile page
    0
    I know its been a while but because I feel EXACTLY like the OP, I have to post this as it is currently proving to be therapeutic. Also, I'd like to know if there are any new ideas on how a nurse can do non-floor-nursing I also like using the smilies...
  6. Visit  efda3} profile page
    4
    Quote from artistnurse
    I know its been a while but because I feel EXACTLY like the OP, I have to post this as it is currently proving to be therapeutic. Also, I'd like to know if there are any new ideas on how a nurse can do non-floor-nursing I also like using the smilies...

    In the same boat, and I am only a new grad. It seems it never gets better. I have already started taking business classes to back myself up and get out of the field if I am unable to find a better niche. Don't feel bad about stating your dislike.

    See, people are conditioned, in nursing school, to put up with abuse. If they don't put up with abuse, they are told "It takes a *certain* person to be a nurse" or.."You have to have what it takes". It's all brainwashing, so now you feel guilty for stating your dislike of the field, which is actually quite normal.
    ok2bme, Sisyphus, Ambitiouz, and 1 other like this.
  7. Visit  carolmaccas66} profile page
    0
    Agencies will probably take u as u have 2 years experience, (don't know what country ur in so don't know their requirements). U can then choose days/hours & the areas u want to do, though you might not get totally out of bedside nursing. But many agencies are branching out into different areas, ie: community work, or maybe you can work in a Drs office. Then the days u have off r ur own, u can ask not to be called in & you can have more time for yourself to de-stress a bit. I'd dust off that resume (CV) and start contacting all of them now. U sound like u need to leave that hospital setting for good.
  8. Visit  Ambitiouz} profile page
    2
    Quote from efda3
    In the same boat, and I am only a new grad. It seems it never gets better. I have already started taking business classes to back myself up and get out of the field if I am unable to find a better niche. Don't feel bad about stating your dislike.

    See, people are conditioned, in nursing school, to put up with abuse. If they don't put up with abuse, they are told "It takes a *certain* person to be a nurse" or.."You have to have what it takes". It's all brainwashing, so now you feel guilty for stating your dislike of the field, which is actually quite normal.

    You couldn't be more right about being conditioned to put up with abuse. I'm a new grad myself and I i work on a unit with a lot of new grads at my job feel the same way but none are talking about it because of being made to feel guilty.
    Stayedtoolong and efda3 like this.
  9. Visit  efda3} profile page
    5
    Quote from Ambitiouz
    You couldn't be more right about being conditioned to put up with abuse. I'm a new grad myself and I i work on a unit with a lot of new grads at my job feel the same way but none are talking about it because of being made to feel guilty.
    It took me a second to realize it. Most are in denial, IMHO. Who wants to admit that they were duped into working hard for a profession where abuse, harassment, bullying, and disrespect are to be accepted? Sometimes nurses deal with that reality by living in denial. Everyone has their own ways of coping, I suppose.

    I think a lot of it has to do with the media/gov't as well.
    Lovely_RN, Ambitiouz, Stayedtoolong, and 2 others like this.
  10. Visit  sironside} profile page
    3
    I'm fed up with nursing as many of you are. At least on the med/surg floor. Been doing it for 19 months since graduating. I'm in the process of getting a job in the OR in another hospital if my references check out, so there is still hope. One of my biggest problems is disrespectful and beligerant A&O pts. Had one last week. I work too damn hard and don't make enough to deal with that kind of BS. I'm extremely compassionate, and I will bend over backwards for patients who are truly sick. But a pt with an I&D to his pinky finger who insists his dressing needs to be changed because there is a small spot of blood on it (it was changed 3 hours before this complaint) and who tells me I'm a bad nurse because I won't give him a sleeping pill "NOW!" and 0430, I cannot tolerate. I refuse to be manipilated and disrespected in such a manner. I'm now on anti-anxiety meds because I'm so busy trying to catch up my work and other's (interdisciplinary as well!) while dealing with such pt mistreatment. I haven't really recieved any insults to my intelligence by doctors or other nurses, not even when I first started this career. I am, however, tired of gossip central at the nurses station and the rumors borne by these nurses that I am sleeping with doctors simply because I am thin, intelligent, and respected by the doctors I work closely with. We're not in middle school folks. Try and keep it professional for the 12 hours we are stuck together. I'm also tired of management. Bottom line: too many changes, too little time. And no respect for nurses. What do they care about? Patient satisfaction and expansion. How about employee satisfaction? Make it a goal, at least? My favorite part: I've been a MS nurse for almost 2 years and have been begging my managers for the last 8 months to allow me to transfer to another specialty. I've been an outstanding employee. What do they do? They take 3 new grads that had scholarships through the hospital and placed them in specialty areas (OR, ER, and ICU) upon graduation. I was a scholarship student too, but I had to go through MS. And for those of you who want to tell me to "do something else," rest assured, I have been trying for almost a year. No one can afford to quit their job and just "look for something else." Let's be practical. I'm also tired of being sick with the flu and colds 5 TIMES over just the past year in addition to being hospitalized for 3 days for a kidney infection (worst pain) from not being able to empty my bladder often because of busy nights at work. I had 6 call outs because of being genuinely ill and my manager tells me I cannot call out anymore until April or I will get written up. It won't matter if I have an MD excuse. Really? Really?! The combination of stress and being exposed to all kinds of viruses from bedside nursing has shot my immune system.
    Thanks to all who read this. I really needed to let it out so I can face another night in the Unit from hell. Maybe venting will help prevent me from crying before I go into work, which has been happening fairly frequently lately. Wish me luck in the potential transition to OR.
    Stayedtoolong, Sisyphus, and RNDreamer like this.
  11. Visit  joanna73} profile page
    0
    What about public health? Telehealth? Clinic? Or sales? There are many areas you could move to that do not require direct bedside care. Dr or dentist office maybe? I have a nurse friend who also was sick of bedside and went to work in sales for a pacemaker company. Good luck.
  12. Visit  enchantmentdis} profile page
    1
    Sorry if this post is a bit long, but how about just a bit of patient care?

    Take this scenario: You are guaranteed 40 hours of pay each week at your full rate of pay, and each night from 2-10:30 or 4-midnight all you do is sit at home and wait for triage calls to come in and you occasionally go out for a pt visit. And no, you are not taking phone calls from the patients--a phone service is and the RN is asked to go out only if the service cannot remedy the situation or if the pt has a change in condition, dies or falls. I am doing this now and receive only 0 to 3 calls each night and work no weekends. After paying my dues for 16 years in large hospitals absolutely despising caring for patients, i now have a job i love, mainly because i handle one, not MANY, problems for ONE patient at a time and often i never see that patient again because we have a census of over 300.

    Here is an example of a typical night i had recently. Checked in at office (didn't have to but i live an hour away so i sync my computer in there first); received a request to replace a foley; read my emails, got in car and drove to ALF; while there got a call that another pt had sob, called MD for first pt, replaced catheter; doc on computer took only 10 mins because the call nurse only docs to the problem we fix; head to next patient--next patient sitting up having dinner and smiling--med tech just wants to know if she can give the already ordered roxanol and ativan at night when pt gets sob and anxiety. Med tech very apologetic, but said she just wanted to speak to a nurse in person about the meds. Told her no problem that's what i am here for. Bear in mind, by 5 pm i have seen only 2 people for about a half hour each time and documenting on care plan for 10 mins each visit.

    The rest of the evening went like this: I kept my cell phone volume turned on high and kept it near my body--not one more call the whole night! I even called the phone triage center to make sure they had my number right and to ask if they tried to contact me--nope, this is how a typical night is, the dispatcher said. I went out with my buddy who works from 4-midnight in the same capacity, had dinner at an upscale restaurant, laughed until i peed, and both of us could not believe that the phone never rang. We went back to her house, watched sit-coms and played with her dog the rest of the night.

    Why have i been having such a great time, you ask?--because of great case management of symptoms is why; which i used to do btw. The case managers where i work start work at 0830 and end around 5 pm, and boy, do they do an excellent job of making sure pt's have meds, dme in place, and are comfortable before the case manager ends her day. I couldn't believe this position actually existed, and the manager begged me to take it. This is what she said within moments of meeting her. " Around 2-6 pm when the case managers are still seeing their patients, we are getting calls for simple things like changes in symptoms r/to wounds, catheters, requests for different meds for changes in syptoms; and of course deaths. Basically you will get full time pay to take just a few visits each night--can you help us out?" I could not believe my good fortune.

    Consider home health or hospice nursing as an on call nurse; you will rarely deal with icky situations and most likely you won't see the same patient twice. Most family members are extremely grateful and just need to talk to someone to get validation that they are doing the right thing by having the patient at home. Also, the MDs who work for our company always answer their cell phones and orders are immediate. Meetings are also very rare, maybe one meeting per month for call staff. And, it is common to not know many of the employees, since you are rarely in the office, so there are no politics. So, if you like not seeing patients or co-workers very often, you might consider this type of nursing, especially if you are confident in you ability to use your nursing skills independently.
    pedicurn likes this.
  13. Visit  enchantmentdis} profile page
    0
    Quote from JentheRN05
    Hi - I've read through this long thread. Here's a question I pose to all of you.
    Is it safe to practice while taking an anti-anxiety med? Which med do you take? I have suffered from anxiety so severe that not only do I have panic attacks I also have developed an ulcer. I avoid taking anti-anxiety meds at work because I fear that it is wrong somehow. I have a Rx for Xanax. Is there something else that would level me out rather than keep me constantly worried that taking xanax is wrong while caring for patients? Help me out here. My doctor is very open to suggestion, but because of my anxiety levels he's actually told me to quit nursing altogether, and that was before I ever graduated. I love nursing. I just need to have less anxiety in it! HELP!!

    I sympathize with your situation. I have an Rx for seroquel and ativan for sleep issues relating to hyperthyroidism, but have not taken them for fear of a drug screen. Also, these meds do effect thinking and alertness, especially in the first few weeks; and driving a car can be an issue at first. I can not afford to take these meds while working since i get very sleepy and feel horrible the whole day. Now that my thyroid has been irradiated after developing hashimoto's thyroiditis, the anxiety is less severe and i am less depressed, however, i am up several times a night due to typical menopause symptoms--itching, frequents trips to void, and general insomnia, and it is tempting to take the ativan; but my company states a drug screen will be done if you get a needlestick, any injury whatsoever, or are in a fender bender while working. It is sad that the BRN is just for patient's protection. Where is the help for nurses. I now handle the above issues by refraining from drinking liquids after 8 pm and maybe two to three times a week take cough syrup to stay asleep--coricidin hpb is pretty good; then i go a week without taking any. I just can't affort to be on any psychotropics or narcotics in this economy, just in case i lose my job, and need to submit to a urine test for another job.Patients also complain to management if the nurse looks tired or loopy. Good luck to you. Be sure to have your thyroid checked. Leaving nursing is probably not the answer.
  14. Visit  sironside} profile page
    0
    enchantmentdis, that sounds awesome, but it's a rare opportunity. Most telehealth and phone triage positions are not full-time and they require at least 3 years of experience. I have 1.5. Looked into case management and those require years of experience as well. But reagardless, I just got a job in the OR and I start January. I'm very excited and feel that this is a better fit for my detail-oriented personality! MS is horrific when taking care of 5-8 pts because you work through your 12 hours aware that it's impossible to know everything about every single pt and with the possibility that something important may be missed. Wish me luck and thanks for your insightful post. Maybe when I am no longer able to stand for 10 hour shifts in the OR, I will think about what you're doing!

    Good luck to all of you!


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