I Double Dawg Dare You, Do It! - page 4

In nursing we all do things that we look back on and we are proud of. Even though we do it we don't always acknowledge it. So I double dawg dare you, just HOW have you made a difference in a single... Read More

  1. by   doddlebuggin
    As an aide I took care of a lady named MeaMea she had 1 daughter 2 twin granddaughters and a grandson. Well when one of the grand-daughters got married I took her as a favor and we joked that I was her date. I was in the family photos and I took her back to the nursing home and she was back before she tired out and the daughter got to enjoy her daughters wedding.Any way to make a long story short I became a nurse moved to a different wing and when MeaMea got very very ill had a huge huge decub and was almost non verbal.When I walked in the room she said "theres my Barbara" I cried after I stepped into the hallway.A Cna said Thats so unprofessionally.I told her When I quit crying that will be un professional and time to give it up...
  2. by   clee1
    Quote from Bipley
    ...We sat down and he looked at that tree in awe. He just stared at that tree, I quickly realized I did a good job. It was as he described. I could easily tell just by watching Herbie.

    We sat there for the longest time just watching the tree. Without moving his eyes from the tree he put his hand on mine and said, "Thank you, child."
    THIS is what nursing is all about. Dealing with ALL the needs of a patient.

    I am not normally an emotional person, but I am my eyes out.
  3. by   clee1
    Quote from Bipley
    I am so thrilled I started this thread. I absolutely love every story here.

    Com'on people, we ALL have a story. Spill it!
    Darn you Bipley!
    I'm getting waterworks all over my keyboard!!!
    What an excellent thread.
  4. by   Bipley
    Quote from clee1
    THIS is what nursing is all about. Dealing with ALL the needs of a patient.

    I am not normally an emotional person, but I am my eyes out.
    Agreed, all the needs.

    You know, regarding Herbie from that day on we had a little different relationship. If he was annoyed at my requests for stories it didn't show quite as much.

    We had a preggers cat wander on the property, the patients named her Callie Cat. Poor little thing, she was so thin yet so pregnant. I took her to the vet, got a clean bill of health and brought her back. We kind of decided since she adopted us we needed to take care of her.

    We got some weight on her, got her looking really good and she had her kittens. All the kittens were amazingly healthy. They stayed in my office until they were old enough to venture throughout the care home rec room. (Funny story, my Shih Tzu would babysit when Callie Cat left the kittens for a bit, he just adored them)

    After the kittens were finally old enough for us to find good homes for them I decided to try something. I put one of the kittens in a box, set the box in front of Herbie's door (he had two doors, one leading outside and one leading to the indoor hallway) and quietly walked away.

    Now, Herbie may have been over 90 years old but his hearing wasn't much of a problem when the kitten started screaming in that box. Since the building was a horseshoe shape I could go to the other side and peek through the drapes and watch. He opened his door, looked around, looked down, and saw the box. Slowly he opened the box and found the kitten. He closed the box back up, left it on the doorstep and had someone come and get me.

    I went to Herbie's room and asked what I could do for him. He kept pointing to the door and said that someone left a baby cat on his doorstep. Wide eyed and surprised, I asked if he was sure. He became frustrated and told me of COURSE he was SURE! There is a baby cat outside his doorstep! Then he wanted to know what I was going to do about it. In my mind I was thinking, "Nothing." I opened the door, opened the box and exclaimed, "There is a KITTEN in this box!" LOL

    He was pretty frustrated by this point and explained that is what he was trying to TELL me!!!! He wanted to know what I was going to do about it. I explained that I was really busy and honestly... I just didn't have time to do anything. I didn't know what to tell him. Perhaps that evening when I got off work I'd figure something out but in the meantime, I had patients to care for.

    Now he was angry. He explained to me that it's a good thing I work with retired folks because I don't know the first thing about babies~ ~He explained that something that little can get a chill. They will die if they get a chill. I repeated to him that I was buried that day, the best I could do was to find an appropriate place for the kitten when I got off work. I shrugged my shoulders, said I was quite sure the kitten would be fine for a few hours.

    I left to run back around to the other side of the horseshoe building so I could watch him and after about 10 minutes he finally opened the door to the screaming kitten and brought the box in his room. I couldn't see anything anymore. I waited a couple of hours and went to check on Herbie and here he is taking a nap with the kitten sound asleep on his chest. The kitten was wrapped in a face towel and both were sound asleep.

    From that point on that kitten belonged to Herbie. He claims he never named it but I suspect he did and he simply wouldn't admit it. They sat on the porch for hours just rocking in the chair, watching traffic go by.

    BTW... having pets in a care facility is possible, you just need to get a variance (sp?) from the licensing authority. We had Simone the doberman, Callie Cat, some fish, birds, and I brought my two dogs to work with my daily. DHS only permits so many before they call it a zoo instead of a LTC facility.
    Last edit by Bipley on Jan 10, '06
  5. by   Cute_CNA
    This is another great thread.
  6. by   ShannonB25
    I Love this thread...of course, I am also sitting here with my cheeks that are wet with tears, but I adore these stories, nonetheless.

    So..for mine. One of the first times I *knew* I'd made a difference to a patient was during nursing school. I was doing my ICU rotation and felt pretty overwhelmed. My patient was an ARDS pt that was being extubated that day. She was in restraints and was fighting the tube so badly- they'd stopped medicating her as well for sedation. Being the cautious nursing student that I was, I stayed by her bedside the entire shift, watching her vitals and all, but more for the support.
    After consulting for about the fifth time with my instructor and the nurse I was orienting with, only to be assured that yes, the pt was fine- she was simply bucking the vent and would be extubated as soon as RT came around, I stood helplessly next to the bed as my pt thrashed about. My patient was an elderly black woman and I noticed she had a Bible next to her bed, no doubt brought in by her kind daughter. I took her hand at that point and said, "Ma'am do you pray?" and she nodded yes, then continued to move about, wild-eyed. I did the only thing I felt moved to do, and I held her hand, closed my eyes, and started to pray out loud for her. It was almost instantly that she began to calm down and when the time came shortly thereafter for her to be extubated, I continued to hold her hand. I'll never forget though that first thing she said, in her raspy, dry voice after they pulled the tube out- She looked straight at me and said "thank you".

    I knew exactly what she meant. I drove home happy that day. Stressed but certain that I had done exactly what was needed for that patient.

    You guys are right you know- it's about *all* of the patients needs, not just the numbers that we get so adept at interpreting.
  7. by   JBudd
    I worked LTC a long time ago, but your stories bring to mind a young man I took care of. He was in his 20s, had severe CP, difficulty speaking, was a total care fellow in a WC, but all there mentally. It was hard for him to go out much. The local high school would give us free admission to rodeo competitions, but the folks had to be able to walk from the van over slightly rough ground to the stands. He really wanted to go, but there wasn't WC access, and the activity director had all she could do to drive the ambulatory folks there and watch over them. So I went along, in my full whites and white shoes, and carried him piggy back over to the stands and sat there to hold him up. He loved it! Then one girl said she could have a ride on her horse, if I could get him up there. So I boosted him up, another person walked on one side and I walked on the off side. The girl leading the horse wasn't paying attention to how much space she needed for us on the sides, and walked me right into a car. It was let go, or, well I just went up the bumper and over the car and jumped down and never let go of him. I got as much applause as some of the riders LOL.
  8. by   MMARN
    Quote from ShannonB25
    I Love this thread...of course, I am also sitting here with my cheeks that are wet with tears, but I adore these stories, nonetheless.

    So..for mine. One of the first times I *knew* I'd made a difference to a patient was during nursing school. I was doing my ICU rotation and felt pretty overwhelmed. My patient was an ARDS pt that was being extubated that day. She was in restraints and was fighting the tube so badly- they'd stopped medicating her as well for sedation. Being the cautious nursing student that I was, I stayed by her bedside the entire shift, watching her vitals and all, but more for the support.
    After consulting for about the fifth time with my instructor and the nurse I was orienting with, only to be assured that yes, the pt was fine- she was simply bucking the vent and would be extubated as soon as RT came around, I stood helplessly next to the bed as my pt thrashed about. My patient was an elderly black woman and I noticed she had a Bible next to her bed, no doubt brought in by her kind daughter. I took her hand at that point and said, "Ma'am do you pray?" and she nodded yes, then continued to move about, wild-eyed. I did the only thing I felt moved to do, and I held her hand, closed my eyes, and started to pray out loud for her. It was almost instantly that she began to calm down and when the time came shortly thereafter for her to be extubated, I continued to hold her hand. I'll never forget though that first thing she said, in her raspy, dry voice after they pulled the tube out- She looked straight at me and said "thank you".

    I knew exactly what she meant. I drove home happy that day. Stressed but certain that I had done exactly what was needed for that patient.

    You guys are right you know- it's about *all* of the patients needs, not just the numbers that we get so adept at interpreting.

    Thank you for this story. It really shows one of the things that nursing is all about. I hope I make the same type of difference in my patients as you made in yours. God bless you.
  9. by   patdnurse
    HI there, just love reading these stories, anyway here's mine. I worked as a district nurse [ similar to your home nurse I guess] here in england and 1 of my patients was Colin a 42yr old terminally ill man..He was a lovely, gentle man who never had a cross word to say and faced his impending death with great courage and dignity .During my time looking after him I found out his passion was that he loved anything to do with tigers,[ toys, photos,tshirts etc,] anyway as we got him pain controlled on a syringe pump he was getting very frail and unable to drive, his wife couldn't drive either .There was a warehouse opening that advertised all sorts of stuff inc huge stuffed toys of different animals. I had been to take a look and saw lots of tigers, some were very realistic. Colin had always wanted to visit and see real ones, but has his health deteriorated realised this wasn't going to happen. I visited him every day and we became friends as well as patient / nurse. On this particular day I said that I was coming back after work to take him and his family out for a ride [ he didn't know where, but his family did ]. After settling him in the car etc, we drove to this warehouse, I had arranged for a wheelchair to take him around especially to the display of large stuffed toys. Well, the look on his face was priceless when he saw all these big cats arranged like they were in the forest . The manager of the store came over [ I had previously asked if it was OK to bring Colin in a wheelchair ] and presented him with the cutest looking 'tiger cub' . We drove back with Colin cuddling his tiger.
    From that day on he always had his cuddly toy with him, and when he died a couple of weeks later, the family put his tiger into the coffin with him.
    Nowadays every time I see a toy tiger I think of Colin and remember the happy times we shared and how priveleged I feel to have known him and be a small part of his life .
  10. by   MMARN
    Quote from patdnurse
    HI there, just love reading these stories, anyway here's mine. I worked as a district nurse [ similar to your home nurse I guess] here in england and 1 of my patients was Colin a 42yr old terminally ill man..He was a lovely, gentle man who never had a cross word to say and faced his impending death with great courage and dignity .During my time looking after him I found out his passion was that he loved anything to do with tigers,[ toys, photos,tshirts etc,] anyway as we got him pain controlled on a syringe pump he was getting very frail and unable to drive, his wife couldn't drive either .There was a warehouse opening that advertised all sorts of stuff inc huge stuffed toys of different animals. I had been to take a look and saw lots of tigers, some were very realistic. Colin had always wanted to visit and see real ones, but has his health deteriorated realised this wasn't going to happen. I visited him every day and we became friends as well as patient / nurse. On this particular day I said that I was coming back after work to take him and his family out for a ride [ he didn't know where, but his family did ]. After settling him in the car etc, we drove to this warehouse, I had arranged for a wheelchair to take him around especially to the display of large stuffed toys. Well, the look on his face was priceless when he saw all these big cats arranged like they were in the forest . The manager of the store came over [ I had previously asked if it was OK to bring Colin in a wheelchair ] and presented him with the cutest looking 'tiger cub' . We drove back with Colin cuddling his tiger.
    From that day on he always had his cuddly toy with him, and when he died a couple of weeks later, the family put his tiger into the coffin with him.
    Nowadays every time I see a toy tiger I think of Colin and remember the happy times we shared and how priveleged I feel to have known him and be a small part of his life .

    OMG. This thread is going to kill me!!!
  11. by   sddlnscp
    This thread is so awesome - thanks you guys. You all know I am just a pre-nursing student right now, so I don't have stories like yours. However, I do what I can wherever I can - right now, that is social services. Just yesterday, I had a client who is an older gentleman come in and ask me to help him with his application, he couldn't see very well to fill it out. Well, I kindly took the app. from him and filled it in as we talked. I listened to him talk about his life as a farm-hand when he was younger and how he wished he could still work, but his health will not allow it. I completed the app. silently, then went over it vocally with him and had him sign it. When he left my office, he went into the office right next to me (not knowing that I could hear him) and told my co-worker, "She (meaning me) is the nicest person I have ever met . . . I was afraid to ask for help, but I didn't even have to with her." That was a small feat, but it made me feel so good.

    Similarly, I have a client who is mentally challenged (in his late 40's) and lives with his father. When I first met him, he was also living with his mother who was terminally ill with cancer (she has since passed away). He was too afraid to be in public to come to my office, so I went to his house. I stayed above and beyond simply filling out the app - spent time talking with the family, and even held the dying mother/wife's hand for a while (she was not conscious - but that is just the way I am). Well, after that, I made a point to "need something signed" or some "piece of information" at least once a week and went over to the house to visit with the family. Well, after a couple of months of my visits, the client finally started going out of the house. He would do little things, like go to the grocery store for a loaf of bread or gallon of milk, but these were huge feats for him (the father later told me he hadn't left the house in over a year except to go into the backyard). One day, his father took me aside and said, "Thank you so much. You don't know what you've done for him, he would have never changed without you. You made him see that people can be good, even to him." He was sincerely touched and I had no idea - I just really enjoyed them. Now I don't have to go to the house anymore because he proudly comes into my office once a month to update me on his circumstances and "chat" before going off to run errands for his father (whose health is failing). It puts a huge smile on my face every time I see him and I know that, no matter where I end up, I will never forget him!

    Keep the stories coming - I love them - and it makes me want, all the more, to become a nurse!!!!
  12. by   nhelkhound
    I met a 25yoF who later became my best friend. Although a student nurse, I did all that I could with her and for her. My proudest accomplishment is that I was always her advocate, even when all others were against us. She suffered from juvenile onset Huntington's Disease. She died at home with me at her bedside. I miss her everyday.
  13. by   Bolts
    Guy's you all are soooo cool, this thread is the best. Too often we seem to focus on the bad/dramatic things in life, it is a breath of fresh air to hear about the good thing in life that are so simple yet mean so much to the people involved.

    My story was when I was on a 4 day placment during my training. I was working on a ward, two rooms, 8 patients, and 1 RN to supervise me. Being a bit of a clown I would go in the rooms early in the morning, cracking jokes, organising the patients showers, making beds, ect. I would talk to all the patients except one. The ward was gastrointestinal, so seven of the patients had had proceedures relating to that, the last patient, Geoff was physically handicapped. Not knowing any better I thought it extended to being mentally handicapped, that sort of scared me I really didn't know what to say or do, and the RN really did most of the work where Geoff was concerned.

    That worked for me, till on the last day I was asked to feed Geoff, ok I thought So off I went. I grabbed his tray said G'day and introduced myself, as you do, and was almost floored when he said G'day back. He must have noticed that I was a bit shocked, so he was stirring me up (giving me a bit of lip/cheek). I thought well he started it so I gave him some back. Over the next 10 minutes we are both laughing like lunatic's, what ever was wrong with him physically certainly didn't affect his sense of humour. We were laughing that hard and loud the NUM left the front desk to see what was going on. I was really suprised, I spent the rest of the day with Geoff met his carer. He taught me the most important lesson about nursing, empathy.

    My only regret was that I didn't meet him on the first day, I left that afternoon, placment over.

    Bolts

    Like I sad at the start, the simple thing that mean so much to those involved.
    Last edit by Bolts on Jan 12, '06

close