I didn't know the shortage was THIS bad - page 5

Just visited a unit today in preparation for my students taking clinicals there. On this particular unit, ONE HALF of the nurses are travelers. The unit only houses 6 pods (4-pt module) and one pod... Read More

  1. by   sjoe
    Rather than trashing RNs who might occasionally scab, remember that the villain in this piece is the hospitals who create the market, not the RNs who do it. If the market were not created, there would be no scabbing.
    Bashing fellow RNs is exactly what the hospitals hope we will do--divide and conquer is the name of the game. (And no, I have never strike-broken, but I can't say this is because of any supposed high principle, it is just something that never happened.)
    It is not as though nurses made up a tightly-organized and mutually supportive team, whose "glue" was threatened by strike-breaking, after all.
  2. by   teeituptom
    howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas


    That was very nicely put sjoe. Yes I do a little strikebusting, because it suits me onve in a while to build up my everpresent golf fund. That might seem simple to some, but my golf fund is important to me anyway. You are right if the market wasnt there, then we wouldnt feel the need to do it.
    Ryan Rn, I have always admitted to who and what I am, and believe in. If you are not getting the benefits and the pay and the respect you feel you should be getting. I say look unto yourself. Nursing as a way of life has supported me. my wife and my seven kids, and my enormous golf habit. I am quite content in that aspect of my life. If you are not content with the way things are, then you may need to consider making some changes in your life. But do not blame me for it.






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  3. by   sjoe
    I've got the solution!

    All of us across the country go on a very long term strike--all on the same day. Then we can all get a lot more money working as strikebreakers at each others' facilities!
    A win-win for nurses, a lose-lose for facilities.

    All it would take would be a little cooperation. Organize!
  4. by   DJrn
    What bugs me the most are the nurse administrators that have forgotten (or never knew) what goes on on the nursing units. They sit back and do nothing when administration wants to make nursing cuts or decrease the staffing ratio. They seem to run the good nurse managers that stand up for the staff out of their positions. They hope that eventually they will find a "yes" person that will take a hatchet to the staffing matrix. Eventually, they succeed in finding the right person for the job. Then things really begin to go down hill in a hurry. When I say that nurses need to stick together, I'm talking loudest to the nurses that are at the top of the management ladder. We troopers will always stand together, but without the backing of the people in power, it is difficult to make a significant difference.
  5. by   UKRNinUSA
    Originally posted by sjoe
    I've got the solution!

    All of us across the country go on a very long term strike--all on the same day. Then we can all get a lot more money working as strikebreakers at each others' facilities!
    A win-win for nurses, a lose-lose for facilities.

    All it would take would be a little cooperation. Organize!

    Good thinking batman!
  6. by   RyanRN
    SJOE, I am not 'trashing' anyone here, merely stating the facts. "Bashing fellow RNs is exactly what the hospitals hope we will do--divide and conquer is the name of the game." SJoe , my friend, that is EXACTLY was a scab perpetuates, like it or not. Whom do you think benefits from keeping the nurses profession from uniting and becoming that "tightly organized team"? The hospital, certainly not the nurse. What are you saying, that is isn't worth the fight so every man for himself!

    For example ,one issue that striking nurses have made is for better nurse'/patient ratio. This decreases complications and SAVES lives . There are now studies to back this up, something nurses have been saying for years (nobody listened to that either) but the brave nurses who did strike to make the point. Scabbing nurses who lay in wait exploit their hard earned progress. Scabbing is a million dollar business. How many other professions or businesses have entire companies built on just that premise, It's appalling.. And it's all in the name of MONEY. I don't for a minute believe the altruisic hype they pitch.

    'Benefits, pay and respect' are not easily earned and someone has to be willing to stick their neck out of their comfort zone. Some just take. And if is 'suits you' teeituptom, well by all means justify on. I'll stick to my 'high principals'. And I know I am right, very comfortable with that too.
  7. by   GPatty
    I have to agree with smiling blueeyes...if staff nurses were paid as much as agency nurses to begin with, we'd more than likely come in and work on our days off.
    Personally, I would love to work agency... just can't work it in right now....
  8. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    NO one is blowing smoke here...we are speaking of our experiences and no one is knocking agency/traveler nurses, we are just wanting equal pay for equal education/certification/experience/work. not too much to ask. not all o us CAN travel or want to.

    It is the hospitals who upset me when they are willing to pay an agency 2 to 3 times what we make to staff. make it WORTH my while to come in on a SCHEDULED DAY OFF; pay me just what an agency would get, and I just might come in! And, if they PAID us that in the FIRST place, I think our staffing situations might improve considerably.
    Good Post SmilingBlueEyes! :wink2:
  9. by   James Huffman
    Interesting discussion here. Several points need making.

    First is that there's nothing wrong with hospitals making money. They are (usually) corporations, and that's one of the things corporations are there for. Hospitals used to be charitable operations, but part of the package with being a charitable is that staff (nurses, mostly) were paid next to nothing.

    Secondly, what's wrong with nurses selling their services to the highest bidder? All nurses are "selling" their services: you give them time, they give you money and benefits. If you don't want to travel, work on a "difficult" unit, work in a bad area, or whatever, that's OK, but nurses are paid what the market will bear, and nurses making $100K+ are generally putting up with some things others don't want to deal with. Those who say that all nurses "should" be making over $100K are not being realistic. There is no fairy in the sky setting nursing salaries. Nurses make more money by being better at what they do, being adept at selling their services, and not being afraid to say what they want. If you are -- in the long-term -- being stepped on, underpaid, or whatever on your job, it's happening because you have chosen to let it happen that way.

    Part of the problem is that many nurses still think it's "beneath" them to negotiate hard-ball over salary, benefits, and working conditions. I have no problem with TV ads promoting nursing careers, but I notice there are no ads begging people to become physicians. If nurses would get over the idea that somehow they should automatically be paid big salaries, and decide to do what it takes to MAKE big pay, there would be no shortage of nurses. Physicians and other professionals do this all the time, and no one grumbles about their "selling their services to the highest bidder."

    As I said before, if you don't want to travel, don't want to move, want to work in a particular hospital or unit, or whatever, that's your call, but stop whining about your salary. You have chosen your salary, and that's OK. Just don't complain about people who fill in the tough gaps, and make bigger money doing it.

    Jim Huffman, RN

    www.NetworkforNurses.com
  10. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas


    Very nicely put James Huffman

    And Ryan RN, you call it high principles, but it sounds like the same old unionist rhetoric to me. "benefits,pay.and respect" are not easily earned, and no union is going to see that you get them. The only person who can do that is you, yourself. Personally I never waited on anyone to give me anything, I went out and got it. The old fashioned way.... I earned it.





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  11. by   CardioTrans
    OK........ I have to get in on this one

    I and a girlfriend of mine were just talking about all this 2 days ago.......

    SmilingBluEyes and FlowerChild......... I agree 100%. People have to realize exactly what it is that nurses do.

    I work at a major teaching university and the largest employer in my state and it is awful! Our CCU unit has 1 nurse on nights that has more than 6 months experience, all the rest of the nurses have been out of school since June. My Heart Transplant ICU has nurses with the avg of 4 yrs exp in nursing. We go to work everyday and keep patients alive by titrating medicines to keep their blood pressure up, we obtain certifications in a variety of things from oncology, CCRN, ACLS, AORN......etc and for what??? 25 cents a certification??? We are talked to like we are completely "stupid" for lack of a better word because we have to call and wake a physician up in the middle of the night because his patient is crashing and hes mad because hes losing sleep. We have college educations and have a highly stressful job keeping these patients alive and are only making just a little more than a broom pusher at the local car plant, who has no college education at all. And doesnt have to worry about keeping someone alive, or having a patient react badly to a drug that they are given, or a code happening to one of the 20 pts in the unit, and Lord forbid that 2 patients code at the same time in the same unit.

    The benefits are awful......... costing over 200 dollars a month for a family while the local Buweiser man has insurance for free.

    All of the "bills" floating around Congress right now are a joke. They are offering to pay for people to go into nursing so that it will help alleviate the shortage.......... While they need to be worrying about the nurses already out in the work force, otherwise they are going to have to pay alot of tuition payments to replace everyone who has left.

    The retention bonuses to stay at the hospitals are pulled out from underneath you just weeks before they are supposed to be given out, citing "budget problems" Well ya know if they would pay their nurses (and I am including LPNs and CNAs) like they pay the pencil pushers who supposedly know all about bedside nursing that faint at the site of blood, and have never been at the bedside......... they may not have a budget problem, much less staffing problems.

    The whole system right now infuriates the hell out of me, and we wont even get into the elder care issue with Medicare and medicines that the elderly have to pay for.

    I have always wanted to be a nurse and over the last 12 yrs of it, it has steadily gotten worse and will only continue to get worse.

    A doctor asked me not too long ago if I had it to do over again would I go to nursing school........ NO I wouldnt. Then he asked me about the shortage...did I think that it would get better......... the answer to that is IT HAS TO or the medical field is going to be in a world of hurt.
  12. by   James Huffman
    Originally posted by CardioTrans
    OK........ I have to get in on this one


    The retention bonuses to stay at the hospitals are pulled out from underneath you just weeks before they are supposed to be given out, citing "budget problems" Well ya know if they would pay their nurses (and I am including LPNs and CNAs) like they pay the pencil pushers who supposedly know all about bedside nursing that faint at the site of blood, and have never been at the bedside......... they may not have a budget problem, much less staffing problems.


    OK, folks, this is a no-brainer. If you are offered a retention bonus, smile real big, and ask for a written contract. If they balk at this, you can be pretty sure there may be trouble down the road. If the retention bonus is part of a general hospital policy, make a copy of that page. And keep it. If they try to back out, don't get mad, just smile, and insist that they keep their end of the contract. If they refuse to do that, smile again, and sue them.

    There's no law that says nurses have to be doormats. Take charge of your life, or others will take charge of it.

    Jim Huffman, RN

    www.NetworkforNurses.com
  13. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas

    AMEN James huffman






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