I&D vs. I&D

  1. 0
    Okay, kids, at work this past weekend had a spinal surgery pt go to surgery to have an I&D d/t post op infection. I was under the impression that I&D stood for irrigation and debridement, but the nursing staff on the floor I was working on that night claimed that it stood for Incision and Drainage. I googled it and these titles seem to be synonymous. Which way is correct?
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  4. 12 Comments so far...

  5. 5
    I personally have only ever heard it used to describe Incision and Drainage. We always called the other "debridement". Be interesting to see what others have seen/heard.
  6. 1
    Thanks for your reply, Angel. Of course, unbeknown to me, the pt was actually a NP and here I go blabbering on about her "irrigation and debridement." lol I felt so silly afterwards but like I said, after looking it up, Incision and drainage and irrigation and debridement seem to be synonymous.. oh well!
    Esme12 likes this.
  7. 4
    I'm an NP, and I would have just smiled and nodded, lol. Don't sweat it, this is how everyone learns!
    Crux1024, Esme12, psu_213, and 1 other like this.
  8. 2
    Incision and debridement. Unless it's incised, it's near impossible to mechanically debride. Seen this with necrotic decubs- no drainage to be found- just "crust" and nasty purpley-black stuff.

    Incision and drainage? Yeah- that, too. And have had that done-- but don't remember what they called it- LOL - just I & D. And with an infection, this sounds reasonable.

    Irrigation and debridement??? Only if using sulfuric acid You'd need some serious psi to blow off dead tissue, which would cause more damage - and if it's just hanging there, you'd more likely just need a good sterile swabbing
    AngelfireRN and kool-aide like this.
  9. 3
    My kudos won't work for AngelfireRN- agree w/her-- learning is a process
    Crux1024, AngelfireRN, and kool-aide like this.
  10. 2
    6 of one, half dozen of the other?
    They are opening some typically closed area up, and cleaning it.

    Irrigation is almost a given, as is some sort of "incision", debridement and or drainage would depend more specifically on what it is exactly...a pus filled spinal cord incision? drain- a necrotic wound?- likely a little of both.

    I will defer to an OR nurse.
    Esme12 and xtxrn like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from hoopschick
    6 of one, half dozen of the other?
    They are opening some typically closed area up, and cleaning it.

    Irrigation is almost a given, as is some sort of "incision", debridement and or drainage would depend more specifically on what it is exactly...a pus filled spinal cord incision? drain- a necrotic wound?- likely a little of both.

    I will defer to an OR nurse.
    I've had patient's with tunneling wounds that were opened up on their own, so were irrigated- but then packed...

    We also had our PT who would whirlpool a crusty necrotic foot, and then go after it with a blade- so not irrigated, and not drained- but sliced in small increments to get to healthy tissue.

    There are a lot of combinations of what can be done; I & D shouldn't be written as just that- the doc should write the words out
    kool-aide likes this.
  12. 3
    Incision and drainage - - not the same as debridement, which is the mechanical removal of debris, hence debridement. I&D is used when the area is fluid-filled; could be purulent fluid.

    Also, debridement is frequently done on a recurrent basis, as in wet-to-dry dressings, or repeated procedures to remove eschar from a burned area or decubitus.

    I can see the confusion.
    Esme12, psu_213, and kool-aide like this.
  13. 2
    I&D Incision and drainage......I refered to them as a poke and pour.... . Irrigation and debriedment is washing it out and clipping back dead skin to reveal healthy tissue.

    No sweat....we all have been there and learned.

    About once a year I am reminded to NEVER comment..."when are you due?"
    xtxrn and Elvish like this.


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