I can't use sick time I've earned?? - page 3

by jodyangel

6,951 Views | 56 Comments

New job. Still on orientation..and just found out that I cannot use any of my accrued sick time until I have 90 hrs in my bank??? Seems So stupid!... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from KelRN215
    Labor laws in the United States do not require any paid time off at all. PTO is a benefit your employer chooses to offer.
    Yes, well, I'm saying PTO SHOULD be a legally protected right. I guess I thought it was, once upon a time. Maybe not. We are not a particularly enlightened country when it comes to the rights of labor.
  2. 2
    Quote from jodyangel
    That seems So wrong. I did call out...had the flu. I'm Not one of theses nurses that works Sick!
    That is fine...but you will not get paid. Many facilities consider orientation/probation/temporary which does not qualify you for benefits. Unlike other professions a nurses sick time accrual is not intended for use. You will not be bought out of it (like we used to) and when you quit you will not be given a check for hours accrued and if you use it excessively you wil be written up......welcome to nursing. That is why a PTO system is better.
    GrnTea and llg like this.
  3. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    This may be standard policy amongst non unionized employers, but it's still fundamentally wrong. It's scary how the American worker is becoming increasingly complacent to his basic rights being trampled. Not being able to use sick time for 365 days? Are there any labor laws left at all?
    No...and there never really was. It's mostly fluff. There are some......but not as many as many Americans thing there are. This is also true for Union facilities. As a matter of fact you aren't protected by the Union until off orientation. They do have their PTO collective bargained into the contract with very strict rules about it's usage. At least in union facility....it gives you a voice,
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from ~PedsRN~
    I don't think mandating a 90 day policy before they pay you for TIME OFF is foolishness.

    I'd like the nurses working with me to actually be ORIENTED to the unit before they skip out on vacay.

    Since when is being sick the equivalent to "skipping out on vacation"? Seriously?

    If a person is sick, then they are sick. In healthcare especially, coming in to work sick could be dangerous not just to your coworkers, but to vulnerable patients. Shame on the hospital/healthcare facility that doesn't provide sick leave.
    multi10 likes this.
  5. 4
    Sounds like a pretty common, ordinary, and quite acceptable policy. Benefits come with conditions, period.

    Your employer will allow you to use sick time after you have proven (through completion of orientation or probation) that you are worth keeping at all.

    You can, of course, get sick in that time, but you will not be given free pay. Once your employer knows they want to keep you on staff, you will be paid for an earned sick day.

    You like that your employer offers sick time, but don't like that you don't get it fast enough on a new job. Can't offer much sympathy.
    GrnTea, psu_213, Ruas61, and 1 other like this.
  6. 1
    Well, I think it's a shame so many people seem to consider things like sick time to be a "privilege" bestowed by a gracious employer rather than a fundamental right that should be protected by law....
    barbyann likes this.
  7. 1
    The wonderful world of nursing! Of all employers, why is it hospitals are the least understanding of the fact that people get sick?
    barbyann likes this.
  8. 3
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Well, I think it's a shame so many people seem to consider things like sick time to be a "privilege" bestowed by a gracious employer rather than a fundamental right that should be protected by law....
    The employee is not being denied the use of sick time, but instead told that during the probationary period it is not accessible. The benefit IS conditional, and it is NOT a right protected by law, so why are you surprised that people treat it as such? If it WERE protected as a right, that would be different. But it isn't, so.....the employee follows the conditions---yes, the privilege--because that's the rule by which it has been offered.

    Apparently you're fortunate enough to have a job that allows you to believe that paid sick leave is a "fundamental right", rather than what it ACTUALLY is: a benefit.
    roser13, KelRN215, and JustBeachyNurse like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from dthfytr
    The wonderful world of nursing! Of all employers, why is it hospitals are the least understanding of the fact that people get sick?
    They don't have a lack of understanding. They have a lack of interest in employees who have been on the clock for a matter of weeks but intend to get paid for taking the day off for illness. It's a matter of business....in this day of crashing reimbursements and rising costs, what makes you think hospitals are any less so?
    JustBeachyNurse likes this.
  10. 3
    Almost every place I've worked at--including in non-nursing capacities--has a policy in place regarding use of sick time on orientation, in order to prevent abuse. Usually the policy was that you could call out if you were really sick but it would be unpaid, or you were limited to X number of sick hours.


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