I am a male L&D nurse - page 2

-this is a response to the male L&D nurse thread This topic pops up often, if anyone is interested I think I have posted on most of them over the past 3 years so you can access them via my... Read More

  1. by   Dayray
    Dixiedi , I think you and I would get along great.

    I had a patient the other day that was very direct. it was her 4th baby and she was 39 weeks. I came in and introduced myself, explained what and why I was going to do. She stopped me before I finished and said.

    "Cut the crap I'm here to deliver a baby and your here to give me pain medicine and call the doctor to come in and catch it! now shut up and check my cervix instead of talking about it".

    Sadly when I checked her she was only 2-3 cm (which she had been for a month) and wasn't contracting very much, but she had such a confidence about her and was miserably uncomfortable with some uterine cramps (just irritability not contx) I kept her past the 2 hour observation time even though she hadn't changed her cervix. I did it because I had a feeling something was going on with her but I was happy because she was so much fun.

    She would say something crass and I would tease her. Then she would start to get mad at me and I would tell her to go home if she didn't like it, then we would laugh.

    Her doctor was an *** and wouldn't come in to assess her although she was spiking a temp and cramping. He wouldn't give me an order for antibiotics because he wanted to send her home. I checked her right before I left and she was still 2-3, however the babies head was well applied to the cervix and very low and some how, I don't know how... after all I'm only a nurse, her water bag broke while I was checking her. It couldn't have been my doing as breaking a water bag is out of the scope of practice for an RN...

    We got her epidural, hung her antibiotic (which the doctor was now willing to give seeing as how there was no excuse to send her home) and she was set to go. Anyhow the next shift couldn't stand her but she delivered 2 hours after I left and the next day I had a card and nice little present in my mailbox from her.

    Signed "thanks for the laughs -Kate"

    So my point of telling this little story? As a nurse you are what ever the patient needs you to be (within reason of course). Not all are there for a spiritual experience but all of them do much better when they feel a connection with their nurse.
  2. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from Dayray
    Dixiedi , I think you and I would get along great.

    I had a patient the other day that was very direct. it was her 4th baby and she was 39 weeks. I came in and introduced myself, explained what and why I was going to do. She stopped me before I finished and said.

    "Cut the crap I'm here to deliver a baby and your here to give me pain medicine and call the doctor to come in and catch it! now shut up and check my cervix instead of talking about it".

    Sadly when I checked her she was only 2-3 cm (which she had been for a month) and wasn't contracting very much, but she had such a confidence about her and was miserably uncomfortable with some uterine cramps (just irritability not contx) I kept her past the 2 hour observation time even though she hadn't changed her cervix. I did it because I had a feeling something was going on with her but I was happy because she was so much fun.

    She would say something crass and I would tease her. Then she would start to get mad at me and I would tell her to go home if she didn't like it, then we would laugh.

    Her doctor was an *** and wouldn't come in to assess her although she was spiking a temp and cramping. He wouldn't give me an order for antibiotics because he wanted to send her home. I checked her right before I left and she was still 2-3, however the babies head was well applied to the cervix and very low and some how, I don't know how... after all I'm only a nurse, her water bag broke while I was checking her. It couldn't have been my doing as breaking a water bag is out of the scope of practice for an RN...

    We got her epidural, hung her antibiotic (which the doctor was now willing to give seeing as how there was no excuse to send her home) and she was set to go. Anyhow the next shift couldn't stand her but she delivered 2 hours after I left and the next day I had a card and nice little present in my mailbox from her.

    Signed "thanks for the laughs -Kate"

    So my point of telling this little story? As a nurse you are what ever the patient needs you to be (within reason of course). Not all are there for a spiritual experience but all of them do much better when they feel a connection with their nurse.
    A nurse would never break the bank. What kind of bank? hehehe Loved the story and admire you for your work. There are many more women who prefer working with men. Anybody who thinks L&D isn't more work for momma than for the nursing staff aint been there often enough! LOL
  3. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Dayray, you sound like the kind of L&D nurse I would love! Keep on keeping on!
  4. by   zenman
    My ex-wife had a male classmate during nurse midwifery school. Apparently he did fine. Males shouldn't have any trouble in this area as they are used to catching footballs.
  5. by   nec
    Can i ask one question? why does our profession differenciate "a male nurse" from everyother nurse? doctor or lawyers do not say a female attorney or a female doctor or vis versa, so can i reiterate my point, a nurse is a nurse is a nurse whether male, female or both so please start from within our profession to educate nurses and the public to stop using the term male nurse thank you nec
  6. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from nec
    Can i ask one question? why does our profession differenciate "a male nurse" from everyother nurse? doctor or lawyers do not say a female attorney or a female doctor or vis versa, so can i reiterate my point, a nurse is a nurse is a nurse whether male, female or both so please start from within our profession to educate nurses and the public to stop using the term male nurse thank you nec
    I have heard many people refer t their dcotor as "a female doctor" and I've heard the same in reference to female lawyers. It was less than a generation ago that a man in nursing was a true rarety, same with women in law and medicine (though female doctors have been gaining in numbers for more than this one generation).

    It's not a sexist thing, it's simply noting that there are differences between the genders that make a nurse/doctor/lawyer more/less desirable than the other to some people.

    I, for one, enjoy working with guys. The conversation is so much more diversified than when working with a typical group of women.
  7. by   |nexus|
    Quote from zenman
    My ex-wife had a male classmate during nurse midwifery school. Apparently he did fine. Males shouldn't have any trouble in this area as they are used to catching footballs.
  8. by   BabyRN2Be
    Dayray, thank you for your insightful post. I would rather had a great RN than a lousy RN at my birth - gender has nothing to do with it.

    Birth is such a miraculous event, and it's a shame that men are usually excluded from this event unless they are the father (or some other relative) and the "male doctor".

    I agree to some extent that birth is a bonding event among women. In the case of hospital births, the atmosphere and general dynamics are different. Birth has become very "medicalized." I attended a delivery last year where I really felt like I was the 5th wheel. The mom requested an early epidural (I do support her choice), but for the entire afternoon, I had to remind the mom that she was in labor. There was no talk of the fact that she was going to have a baby. She just spent the afternoon going through fashion magazines with her friends, and there was no talk of the baby. Although they were happy when the baby arrived, I found it very sad that it all had been so sterile and medicalized.

    It is very different if one is attending a home birth. In this situation, it's very helpful to have someone who understands birth, who has been there and can be intuitve to a woman's needs. The focus is on childbirth, the act of bringing a new life into the world is the forethought on everyone's minds.

    Dayray, it sounds like you are an awesome nurse. It's great that you are the type of nurse who knows his business and has a true love for the field.

close