How Your Life Can Change in the Blink of an Eye! - page 2

Since 1998, my mother has been plagued with numerous health problems, but we had been able to manage. My father has been partially paralayzed from a CVA since 1990. Last Thursday night, I got in from... Read More

  1. by   cardiac.cure03
    How are things going? Anything come w/ the lumbar?

    Best Wishes
  2. by   huskersfan
    Is any of her lab work off? That can cause confusion, also a uti can cause delirium. Elderly get confused so quickly and it can be all kinds of things. It doesn't sound like dementia to me. The Tramadol can cause confusion also. She will need rehab and tell her its skilled care, not nursing home so she will not think you are dumping her in a nursing home. You do have to take it one day at a time and it is amazing how sick they become so quickly and rehab so slowly. Hang in there. Did her pneumonia resolve yet?
  3. by   chase4myheart
    Thanks for all of your replies. The day after the lumbar she was more like her self, but she was just really mad at me and my father because she was there. She still wasn't able to walk or even stand on her own. Three days after that, it was like the lumbar had never been done. She kept thinking she was at home and couldn't understand where my father was at, thought someone had stolen her coffee table, and couldn't understand where the chargers were at for her cordless phones. I went over her meds. She is only taking Tramadol PRN and hadn't had any since the lumbar and wasn't on anything for her nerves. Her antibiotics had been DC'd and the pneumonia seems to have resolved. I talked with her neurologist and she didn't give me any hope at all. She seems to think that the radiation that my mother had to her brain several years ago is causing some of the dementia. She also said that her NPH had gotten a lot worse and that my mother isn't strong enough to survive an operation to put a shunt in. When my mother was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer in 1998, the physicians told us that they didn't feel that she would survive more than 1 year. She had been cancer free since 1999 and her physicians told us that she was a walking miracle. I keep thinking that maybe the cancer is somewhere else and they just haven't found it, but they had done CT scans and MRI's. I'm just afraid that this time she won't come out of it. Thanks so much for all of your replies. This board is a great comfort to me.
  4. by   Jolie
    My prayers to you and your family.
  5. by   DutchgirlRN
    I am so sorry for what you are going through. When I was a little girl I also told my parents that I'd never put them in a nursing home. Now as an adult with elderly parents that reality looms over me. I realize that promise was made by a child with no knowledge of the vast range of changes that life brings to us but rather by a child who only knows how much she loves her mother.

    I am very fortunate that both of my parents enjoy good health in their 80's but being a nurse I know how quickly that can change. I have discussed these issues with my parents, briefly, because it's hard to deal with. My parents have voiced that as long as they have their minds they don't want to be in a nursing home. Assisted living ok but no nursing home. If they develop alzheimers or dementia they both agree that they should be put into a nursing home. That doesn't make it any easier but I do know their feelings.

    You need to try to release yourself from that promise you made as a little girl. Your mother would understand. There are good nursing homes. I have visited many of them as a HH nurse and some are really quite home-y and the residents receive excellent care as well as rehabilitative therapy. Going into a nursing home doesn't mean you can't ever leave there. Patients can recover and return home. I've seen it happen often. Nursing homes used to be all doom and gloom but that has changed for the most part. You have control over which facility she goes to, visit them on the off hours, when administration is not around to get a real feel for the place. Ask others who have parents in nursing homes for advice. I truely cannot imagine what you are going through but I feel your pain. God Bless.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    This book has a chapter on all the health problems that can cause delerium. From electrolyte imbalance to infection to endocrine disorders. It should help communicate with the physician or find another doctor.
    The author went through this. There are many many resources in the book and you can even call her.

    Elder Rage, or Take My Father... Please!: How to Survive Caring for Aging Parents
    http://www.amazon.com/Elder-Rage-Tak.../dp/0967970318

    Here are more resources:
    http://www.whyy.org/widerhorizons/ca...gresource.html
  7. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from spacenurse
    This book has a chapter on all the health problems that can cause delerium. From electrolyte imbalance to infection to endocrine disorders. It should help communicate with the physician or find another doctor.
    The author went through this. There are many many resources in the book and you can even call her.

    Elder Rage, or Take My Father... Please!: How to Survive Caring for Aging Parents
    http://www.amazon.com/Elder-Rage-Tak.../dp/0967970318

    Here are more resources:
    http://www.whyy.org/widerhorizons/ca...gresource.html
    Spacenurse, awesome post, I'll keep that information as well. Thanks.
  8. by   huskersfan
    Keep us updated on your mothers condition. I will keep you all in my thoughts. I know how difficult it is on you and your family. My mother is a terribly brittle diabetic, with dementia, osteoporosis with fractures, legal blindness and no appetite. Caring for her at home is challenging for my dad and brother...
  9. by   Effie, RN
    Normal pressure hydrocephalus mimics alzheimer's. If she is not being followed by someone with special experience with this disorder, you need to find someone!

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