How to work your notice, gracefully - page 2

So you have decided to leave your current job, you've had enough of working hard, no teamwork, you don't like your boss, co-worker, management, the drive is too long, the acuity is too high, you... Read More

  1. Visit  exit96 profile page
    3
    I have 1 week left at my facility and my aim is and has been to leave gracefully. I have been treated well, but even if I hadn't been I can only control my behavior, and it's easier to sleep at night that way. I am however, wondering how to respond to the EXIT interview. I would like to be truthful b/c there are issues that really should be resolved...
    ie; lame NM- no follow up on serious concerns re: pt safety/med admin, low moral on the unit d/t habitual offenders (calling in, leaving responsibilities undone) not being reprimanded for not caring enough to correct their behavior,
    Basic disregard for co-workers by lame/lazy nurses who are forever pushing responsibilities onto the next shift, small facility drama (unreal the amount of drama that is "created" and not even real)

    So I will focus on how the job has been a good thing for me, which it has. I am leaving Med/surg for my first job in E.D.
    My aim is to keep the door open for ME. Hopefully this foolish activity will not be part of my next job.
    gloryfied, Fiona59, and madwife2002 like this.
  2. Visit  rngolfer53 profile page
    2
    Quote from goalienrse
    I have a mixed reaction to this post.

    I left my first nursing job on good terms, filled out my notice happily and thanked HR for the oppurtunity and did everything right. But was leaving bc I had what I thought was my dream job waiting for me. So when I found out it wasn't, were 8 months later, they accpted me back with open arms.

    My 2nd job, the one I left for, was a horrible exp I will never forget and would leave nrsg and eat dog food before working for them again. I gave my 2 wks after 6 months. I gave it my all, even stayed over completeing my work 45 mins after my shift on my last day. Did me no goood! I went on 5 interviews before having too crawl back to first job. I don't know what HR said or did, but I have my suspicions, bc how would I know what there saying?

    So basically I'm saying the article is right, but it still may or may not do you any good.
    Certainly, there are not guarantees, but it pays to do what you can to put the odds in your favor, as you say.

    The majority of people will not chose to do what is wrong unless you give them a plausible reason. Leaving with a lousy attitude and poor performance in the notice period can be that reason.

    Some people will incline to do what is wrong, unless you make it hard for them to. Following the advice of the article does make it harder to justify dumping on someone who's been a good nurse right up thru the last shift.
    goalienrse and madwife2002 like this.
  3. Visit  GadgetRN71 profile page
    3
    I wouldn't do an exit interview. They sound like a great idea on paper but I believe it actually can come back to bite you in the butt too. Remember, HR is not your friend.
    sneeds, Hoozdo, and madwife2002 like this.
  4. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    0
    You would be surprised at how much HR knows, a lot more than we credit them for. Re the exit interview always a difficult one and I havent got a lot of advice on how to manage them. It has been my experience that they don't always do one when a place is awful, I sometimes think they do not want to know or they dont want to hear about it! Either way I would go with my gut!


    Quote from exit96
    I have 1 week left at my facility and my aim is and has been to leave gracefully. I have been treated well, but even if I hadn't been I can only control my behavior, and it's easier to sleep at night that way. I am however, wondering how to respond to the EXIT interview. I would like to be truthful b/c there are issues that really should be resolved...
    ie; lame NM- no follow up on serious concerns re: pt safety/med admin, low moral on the unit d/t habitual offenders (calling in, leaving responsibilities undone) not being reprimanded for not caring enough to correct their behavior,
    Basic disregard for co-workers by lame/lazy nurses who are forever pushing responsibilities onto the next shift, small facility drama (unreal the amount of drama that is "created" and not even real)

    So I will focus on how the job has been a good thing for me, which it has. I am leaving Med/surg for my first job in E.D.
    My aim is to keep the door open for ME. Hopefully this foolish activity will not be part of my next job.
  5. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    1
    It's always better to leave on good terms than on bad . . . and our own behavior will often decide which it is. There are plenty of times when it's tempting to take the low road, but that can come back and bite you in the butt when you least expect it.

    Good article and good advice.
    madwife2002 likes this.
  6. Visit  katherine100 profile page
    0
    I don't believe that at all. HR it seems does not know enough. Nurses b*tch and complain to eachother more than going to management.
  7. Visit  AntMarchingRN profile page
    3
    I would like to remind people to resign with caution.
    You should be prepared to be without employment for the notice you give. I recently gave my job the required 15 day notice so I would not be considered a "do not rehire" and to do the right thing by my management and co-workers. I was told by my manager not to come back to work for those 15 days. I had worked my last shift. I was shocked. I had no problems at my job before giving notice. I loved everyone I worked with and had a great relationship with management...or so I thought. I only left because my dream job had come up and I had to move for the opportunity. I was planning on helping to precept someone to take my position if needed but instead I ended up without a paycheck and no money until my first check from the new job came. It was a hard month. I was in no way ready for them to end it that way. I guess it had upset them that I was quitting and this was the only way they could "punish" me. I know I did the right thing by giving proper notice, and I suggest you all do the same, just a word of caution to be prepared for the chance that you may need to have something saved up until your next check after giving notice. I don't want others to be trying to move (which is always expensive) with no pay coming in. I never saw it coming...
    MedChica, GadgetRN71, and Fiona59 like this.
  8. Visit  Vespertinas profile page
    3
    AntMarching, your post reminded me of my first manager so I'd like to share a story about how not all departures are horrific.

    When I left, she gave recommendations that were so flattering (apparently) that recruiters called me back breathless. I'm not saying I was that amazing, my manager was. Then, since I had stupidly moved to another state without having actually secured a job first, she paid out my vacation for the next two weeks AFTER I HAD MOVED. Bless her heart.
  9. Visit  katherine100 profile page
    2
    Your story reminds me we are not as big a deal as we think we are in nursing. I work for a facility that was in IJ and they were hiring and DNR-ing people left and right even though they needed the staff. Your story is a first for me. glad you had another job lined up.
    Fiona59 and madwife2002 like this.
  10. Visit  ppfd profile page
    1
    I left my last RN (ED) job this past December. I typed up a resignation, giving 2 weeks, went in handed it to the manager and explained the situation, partially.
    Part one was true, My present job was going through "budget cuts" I work county government, and my division is union. Long story, short, county violated the contract, we won and got our hours and back pay for a year. I took the nursing job because I wasn't sure if lay offs were next. With my normal hours and rate of pay, I am making more than I was at that particular hospital ED, and when you factor over an hours drive 2 ways.

    Part Two - and maybe I was just paranoid! I just had a strange feeling I was going to get canned after orientation/probation?? Yeah I know silly, but it was the weirdest feeling. So I resigned.

    Anyway, I'm way off track! I explained the situation to the manager, she took it to the dept. director, and he called me in to his office and I explained again. He seemed pretty cool with it and asked if I had problem with today being my last day. Day of resignation and not 2 weeks later. He stated something about end of year budget and it would help him? Who knows, what could I say, I demand to work 2 weeks!
    He said I could reapply at any time and there would be no issue. I doubt I would unless I had no option, the pay was low for RN and the drive was long.
    madwife2002 likes this.
  11. Visit  katherine100 profile page
    1
    @pp How long were you working there? They do that sometimes when you are not there long.
    madwife2002 likes this.
  12. Visit  twopurpleskittles profile page
    1
    Quote from GadgetRN71
    I saw this happen to a former coworker of mine. He finally had to resort to calling the HR department of the old hospital and requesting to see his file. He offered to bring his attorney with him. Funny, after that he started getting calls for interviews again.

    So sadly, I believe that you can do everything right and still get screwed.
    Good tip about asking to see HR file! I need to remember that. I did work out my 2 weeks happily with my last full time job with a home care company. I then interviewed and was offered an ER position on the spot only to be called 2 days later by HR. I was told that they hired a new ER manager and I might get a call for an interview with the new manager in a month or two. Hmmm. Sounds mighty fishy. I feel like I may have been slandered by the manager who was an unrealistic slave driver who admitted that she hadn't seen her kids in 4 years because of the hours she put in doing home care. She was actually proud of that! So, you can do it right and still get screwed for sure.
    GadgetRN71 likes this.


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