How to get away from a patient - page 2

I'm a new CNA and I really need some advice from anyone who has experience with patient care. I work at a LTC facility and we're stretched beyond thin with almost no time to attend to our residents'... Read More

  1. by   Aneroo
    One thing I always make sure to tell my patients when I need alone time (paperwork) or need to care for another pt is that I will be doing paperwork (or whatever I'm doing), and that I will be available by call light and will be in to check in about _ minutes/hour.... This keeps them off my tail and off the light, but reminds them that I did not forget about them, and even though I'm not right there, I can be if they need me to be. -Andrea
  2. by   Brenda-RN,BSN, WA.
    I just wanted to say that I think it is great that you actually want to spend time with the residents. You are obviously very caring, and in the right profession. It is so sad when there are people who have no visitors, and they just sit all day, and they are so lonely. I always think "what if that's me someday." Or my husband, if I die first, or my kids, when they're old. I really don't have any advice, except what someone else said about saying that you will really try to come back later after you finish up some other work. I know it's difficult. I just think you are so wonderful to be thinking about this. I hope someone like you is able to take care of me if I'm ever in this situation. Good luck.
    Quote from shel_wny
    I'm a new CNA and I really need some advice from anyone who has experience with patient care.
    I work at a LTC facility and we're stretched beyond thin with almost no time to attend to our residents' emotional needs. I love to chat with them as I dress them, let them use the toilet, or clean them up but they always want me to stay longer to talk and they have so much to give. I feel awful because I cannot spend the 15 minutes in their room listening to them and keeping them company. But, at the same time, I don't know how to get away. Do I interrupt and say, "I'm so sorry, but I need to put 10 two-assist residents to bed within the span of the next 10 minutes and the hall call lights look like a Christmas tree, I'd love to talk but I've honestly got to go?" I feel awkward and many times I end up spending way too much time in one resident's room, putting me behind for the entire night. That's deadly as I am slow to begin with because I'm new.
    Some of the other CNAs just lie to the resident and say that they'll be right back but they never come back and the alert residents remember that. I am a person who does what I say I will and I refuse to simply say I'll be back in a few minutes and not return.
    How do you folks excuse yourself when your duties are done?

    Shel
  3. by   night owl
    We don't have many residents who love to chat, but we do have a few. I always make sure I give the "chatters" alittle extra time, then I tell them I have to move on the the others; they usually understand. I always tell them if they need me for anything I'll be where ever. They always appreciate you taking the time to talk to them and usually tell you so. I don't worry about getting out on time so much, or getting paid that 5-10 minutes that I do stay over because I devoted alittle time to some of my residents. They are my priority. The paperwork isn't going anywhere so what's the rush? I have no one waiting for me at home in the morning, so I don't need to be there at any set time. I always try to put myself in their shoes because I can only hope that someday someone will spend alittle time with me when I need it.
  4. by   michelle95
    At the last nursing home I worked at, CNA's weren't allowed to stay in the nursing station. The reason? Because if those 4-6 sat at the desk, there wasn't enough room for us to chart, make phone calls, etc. The nurse's station wasn't big enough. And, if the CNA's were sitting behind the desk, most of the time they were only chatting.

    As far as I was concerned...when I worked 3-11, I didn't have a problem if the CNA's sat behind the desk. As long as they cleared a spot if I needed to chart or do other paperwork....they could stay. Other nurses weren't like that, though.
  5. by   jyoung1950
    Never got a reason, just couldn't sit behind at the nurse's station. Sacred grounds, maybe?



    Quote from Mandarella
    [font=Comic Sans MS]OK ,that's insane, insulting, giving a green light to everyone to "class" employees. How can anyone work somewhere that doesn't let fellow employees work in the same area? I would feel like I was unappreciated and lower than low. :angryfire That's definately not good for morale. What was the reasoning for not going behind the desk or even sitting at it?? They shouldn't be storing meds behind a desk, and patient confidentiality is just a given. Our CNA's chart their vitals right in the patient charts, so they have the same understanding of confidentiality that any nurses would have...besides seeing a patient's care plan could only be helpful to a CNA I would think...
    [font=Comic Sans MS]What do I know...
  6. by   CarolineRn
    Quote from shel_wny
    I'm a new CNA and I really need some advice from anyone who has experience with patient care.
    I work at a LTC facility and we're stretched beyond thin with almost no time to attend to our residents' emotional needs. I love to chat with them as I dress them, let them use the toilet, or clean them up but they always want me to stay longer to talk and they have so much to give. I feel awful because I cannot spend the 15 minutes in their room listening to them and keeping them company. But, at the same time, I don't know how to get away. Do I interrupt and say, "I'm so sorry, but I need to put 10 two-assist residents to bed within the span of the next 10 minutes and the hall call lights look like a Christmas tree, I'd love to talk but I've honestly got to go?" I feel awkward and many times I end up spending way too much time in one resident's room, putting me behind for the entire night. That's deadly as I am slow to begin with because I'm new.
    Some of the other CNAs just lie to the resident and say that they'll be right back but they never come back and the alert residents remember that. I am a person who does what I say I will and I refuse to simply say I'll be back in a few minutes and not return.
    How do you folks excuse yourself when your duties are done?

    Shel
    Awww Shel, you sound like the sweetest person. I know how you feel. Even as an RN, time restraints do not allow us to care for the emotional needs of our pts as much as we would like too.

    To be honest, I have found that when dealing with pts who are A&Ox3, A simple explanation that you really are having fun talking to them, and that you do enjoy their company, but others are calling and you will come back and spend time with them as soon as possible really DOES work. (just to sure to follow up on your promise) During bed baths, you can talk to these pts and learn so many things, and you will indeed feel better for it. The elderly have so much to teach us! Don't feel guilty, you are doing what you can, and the blame lays on the shoulder of the higher-ups who cannot or WILL not sacrifice profits for the sake of better nurse-pt ratios. Many of our pts know this, and as long as you are respectful, kind, and honestly attentive, they will be patient pts.

    Thanks so much for being a wonderful, caring CNA! And know that you ARE appreciated and respected!
  7. by   StephMSeattle
    I was thinking, "RUN, B*TCH. RUNNNNN!" I guess that applies to my facility alot more than most. We have alot of alcoholics, addicts, and psych patients. Sometimes we get the combo deal and have a patient who is all three of these at once! Lucky us... I'll take the #3 Crazy MF combo w/cheese, dual diagnoses, and a large drink, please!
  8. by   mscsrjhm
    Get between the patient and the door, look out the door as if someone was there, then tell the patient "they are paging me, I have to go". Yes, it is a lie.

    Or, I look out the door, down the hall, and say "yes, Doctor, I will be right there". Works every time.

    We all deal with the lonely elderly, whether in the hospital or LTC setting, and this has been the kindest way that I have found to "escape".

    If I tell the patient that I would love to talk/listen, but I have to take care of others, they sometimes will be less talkative later, since they don't like to "impose", or "be a bother". This way I have escaped, they have kept their dignity, and we can talk later.

    Mschrisco
  9. by   Chad_KY_SRNA
    I wish that I had more time to spend with my residents, so I could sit and listen to them tell their stories. They are really so very lonely and I can only afford a few minutes to spend with them and it breaks my heart. These little old folks have been put in a strange place where they are told when they can eat, when they can go to the bathroom, what time they have to go to bed, what they can wear, when they can bathe and where they can go. I can't imagine sitting in a room all day and not having a soul to talk with. The residents deserve to be heard. They know so much and have been a part of history. I had one resident who worked closely under JFK, another who was an OR nurse back in the 50's when they still used ether daily, another who taught in a one room school house, many many war veterans, a World War II combat surgeon, a retired family practitioner, a popular local judge, a fire and brimstone mountain preacher, an long time EMT who was a member of the local Rescue Squad (search and rescue unit), so many people with so many different stories to tell. I just don't have the heart to run away from them when they are talking about their life. Their faces light up and they look so happy when you sit with them and listen to them tell a story or two. I could almost give up nursing to join the activites dept. so I wouldn't get into trouble for sitting and just listening. Just my 2 cents about that.

    YOU AREN'T ALLOWED BEHIND THE DESK! Thats crazy, like one of the previous posters said, we clear an area for the nurse but we can sit behind the desk. That would make me feel like I was respected for my training and abilities.....not! I didn't take the direct CNA class, I did four years of Health Sciences at the vocational school level while in high school to become a CNA. I have had classes and hold certificates in medical math and terminology, anatomy and physiology, wellness, human growth and development, basic nutrition, first aid, CPR, Nurse Aide, basic office skills, and I can type 45 words a minute. So it really hurts sometimes to be treated like that. I put a lot of time and effort into becoming "just a little old" CNA. Don't nobody dare start to tell me where I can sit. I'll just sit in the floor and block the door. Y'all wanted to sit there, now sit! The sad part is I know CNAs who would do that. I might join them in the floor if the nurse was acting as silly as that. I feel like Rodney Dangerfield, "I get no respect!"

    Have a nice day y'all. Sorry that I went on a rant. I just feel like I can with everyone on here. Everyone is really pretty cool and sometimes the rants get interesting.
    Last edit by Chad_KY_SRNA on Jun 16, '04
  10. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from shel_wny
    I'm a new CNA and I really need some advice from anyone who has experience with patient care.
    I work at a LTC facility and we're stretched beyond thin with almost no time to attend to our residents' emotional needs. I love to chat with them as I dress them, let them use the toilet, or clean them up but they always want me to stay longer to talk and they have so much to give. I feel awful because I cannot spend the 15 minutes in their room listening to them and keeping them company. But, at the same time, I don't know how to get away. Do I interrupt and say, "I'm so sorry, but I need to put 10 two-assist residents to bed within the span of the next 10 minutes and the hall call lights look like a Christmas tree, I'd love to talk but I've honestly got to go?" I feel awkward and many times I end up spending way too much time in one resident's room, putting me behind for the entire night. That's deadly as I am slow to begin with because I'm new.
    Some of the other CNAs just lie to the resident and say that they'll be right back but they never come back and the alert residents remember that. I am a person who does what I say I will and I refuse to simply say I'll be back in a few minutes and not return.
    How do you folks excuse yourself when your duties are done?

    Shel
    Many of the folks in your facility, even the "confused" ones, have more understanding of what's going on than we think. Be truthful with them. Tell them you would love to chat but time does not permit it. Mention their neighbors who are waiting for you. Most pts know the person next door and they will understand that "Millie" needs her turn with you too.
    You will gain their respect if you are truthful with them.

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