How to get to work in a snowstorm? - page 4

Hi. I was wondering what your hospitals policy is on snowdays? Ours doesn't have one and I live 1 1/2 hours from work. The highway was actually closed and I was still expected to come in?... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from mulan
    how can they expect anyone to come in if the road is closed? what are you supposed to do, take a snowmobile or maybe fly?
    [font="comic sans ms"]generally, snow isn't a big surprise. if there's going to be a snowstorm and you're scheduled to work, you may want to go early, stay in a hotel near work or work on the excuses you're going to be making to your co-workers for the next year. and yes, you can take a snowmobile to work. i've gotten to work in a snowmobile, snow cat and on skis.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    duplicate sorry.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 6, '07
  3. by   kate1114
    Quote from Mulan
    So one is supposed to spend all the money they would make for that shift on a hotel room just so they could be there at work?
    Lots of people do it. In fact lots of hospitals either provide beds or pay for hotel rooms for staff. They'd rather be out that money than paying for travelers or dealing with the repercussions of night shift nurses working several hours over. All it would take would be one malpractice suit (due to inadequate staffing or errors from sleep deprivation) to bring the hospital to paying for nights at the Ritz

    Also, some people stay with coworkers. There are tons of ways to make this work. Since the OP has come up with so many reasons why it wouldn't work for her, then it's best for her to discuss options with management. For others reading this post, and looking for ideas, we're trying to provide some options for those who really want to make it to work. Just a thought...

    BTW, where do you you work that you are paid so poorly and hotels cost so much that you couldn't find a place for less than 2-3 hours' pay? I'd renegotiate my salary if I were you
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from MomNRN
    I don't call it self-martying, I call it loyalty and responsibility.

    I knew hiring into an ER hospital position, that I would be expected to work regardless of the weather. Yes, sometimes it is inconvenient.

    Today for example, it started snowing about 45 minutes before I left for work. It took me a little longer, but I made it. Had I called in citing weather, who would have taken take of the three Level 2 traumas we had?

    Our ED was getting slammed - another day with no lunch or break to pee! If I had called in, what a slap in the face to my coworkers who were just as harried!

    It is an individual choice only you can make.
    Agree. If you wanted, you could have become a librarian, a teacher, grounds keeper, or other worker where they close shop in foul weather. But you chose to be a nurse in a hospital, no less. As hospital workers, we make a conscious decision to take employment in a place we know well, operates 24/7/365, never closing ----even in bad weather. Maybe another choice or venue is what is needed for those who feel bad weather alone is an excuse to call out, automatically. The rationale that other businesses were closed does not fly. People get sick; babies are born no matter what the weather is---and folks tend to actually flood our doors when it's bad. SOMEBODY has to handle it. We were hired to do so, and so we should do our best. Blocking incidents are one thing. Snow, another. We most often have notice when bad weather is coming and therefore, have the opportunity to make arrangements. That is not our employers' responsibility, but our own.

    Now doing the best we can to get to work in lousy conditions, is not being a martyr. It's doing what we are hired to do and considering others have the same pressing concerns (daycare and safety) that we do.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 6, '07
  5. by   AfloydRN
    I never realized how many negative responses I would get by asking such a simple question. I'm sorry but I don't feel my job is worth my life and I am sorry for those who do.
  6. by   Mulan
    Not everyone has a snowmobile.
  7. by   Mulan
    Quote from AfloydRN
    I never realized how many negative responses I would get by asking such a simple question. I'm sorry but I don't feel my job is worth my life and I am sorry for those who do.
    I think you have the right perspective. Years ago I might have agreed with the above responses but not anymore.
  8. by   bethin
    Quote from kate1114
    Lots of people do it. In fact lots of hospitals either provide beds or pay for hotel rooms for staff. They'd rather be out that money than paying for travelers or dealing with the repercussions of night shift nurses working several hours over. All it would take would be one malpractice suit (due to inadequate staffing or errors from sleep deprivation) to bring the hospital to paying for nights at the Ritz

    BTW, where do you you work that you are paid so poorly and hotels cost so much that you couldn't find a place for less than 2-3 hours' pay? I'd renegotiate my salary if I were you
    Haven't seen any hotels lately for $20-$30, my 2-3 hr wage.

    My employer does not provide beds or pay for hotels for staff. Beds in our hospital are for pts or dr's only. Would be wonderful if they did, as they have one empty floor with beds made up. Is this more common in larger hospitals?

    Thank God I still make it to work in the snow....somehow.
  9. by   Kyrshamarks
    Loyalty to God, Loyalty to Country, Loyalty to Family, Loyalty to Yourself, Loyalty to you Friends and lastly is Loyalty to you job. Responsibility to you God, Responsibility to your Country, Responsibility to your Family, Responsibility to Youself, Responsibility to your Friends, and lastly again is Responsibility to your job. Note I did not capitalize job becasue of all the responsiblities that is the LEAST important responsibility and loyalty one should have and in a healthy person it is the LAST thing that they should have.
  10. by   atwtrn
    This post makes me nervous. As a student, there have been times when the weather was awful and without a car I rely on bus transportation. I hope that if I work in a snowy area that I have these options....but what If I don't? I'm def going to ask about policies and if they'll pick people up...lol
  11. by   realnursealso/LPN
    :smackingf Go to work in a blizzard? not. No job is worth my life. In fact I called in today. We have gotten about 4 feet of snow since Friday. My agency totally understood. And the mom of the little guy I take care of, she called to make sure I was ok. Their is no amount of money worth my life. I have been a nurse 27 years, no employer expected me to drive to work in nasty weather. I'm not talking about a little storm, I also have 4 wheel drive. But a no unnecessary travel order was in place, and driving 40 miles to work in a blizzard was not necessary. Oh and the highway I take to my case? It was closed. Afloyd, relax, I agree with you.:smiletea:
  12. by   canoehead
    I am speaking as someone who lives in an area that gets regular storms every year. Sure, if the highway is blocked, you can't get in. If there are downed power lines in your way, you have to turn around. However, if you land in the ditch, call a tow truck, if your driveway is blocked, have it plowed. You'd have to do those things anyway, so make sure they are done in time to get to work. Obtaining a babysitter is a parental responsibility that doesn't change just because the snow flies. When you live in a snowy area you need to be able to cope with the weather. For me that means having studded snow tires from Oct to April, and allowing twice the normal time to get anywhere. If you are unhappy about driving, stay over at the hospital to minimize your exposure to the bad weather, and if you know that once or twice a year you will want to stay over- pack for it and keep provisions in your car.

    I disagree with posters that say if they are uncomfortable drinving they will stay home. You can't live your life in dread of what might happen. If you are really nervous, go out during the next storm to the school parking lot and experiment with stopping and turning until you are comfortable. It is really a skill and you can learn if you give it a shot. If you have accepted a job that will require your prescence even in bad weather you have made a committment to show up. If you can't fufill the promise, find a clinic or MD office position.

    BUT- big but- any hospital that says you must come in even though the police have closed all the roads to the hospital is plumb crazy. If they do not allow workers to stay overnight or provide them with a cheap motel- well, sorry, if I go home after requesting accomodations then I may not be back. It's a two way street, and they should be making an effort for the employees that are making an effort to be there.
  13. by   Mulan
    Quote from canoehead
    any hospital that says you must come in even though the police have closed all the roads to the hospital is plumb crazy.

    exactly

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