How Often Will I Be On My Feet As A Nurse? - page 3

Hi Everyone, I am a 27 year old law school grad who is totally fed up with the law/criminals and I am thinking about nursing school. However, I am used to basically sitting all day and wanted to... Read More

  1. by   Brita01
    I work private duty and I sit most of the time. But my feet earned the rest from those years spent in LTC and med/surg. I can remember coming home after passing meds in the nursing home and wanting to shove both of my feet into piles of icecubes they were so swollen and sore.
  2. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from Brita01
    I work private duty and I sit most of the time. But my feet earned the rest from those years spent in LTC and med/surg. I can remember coming home after passing meds in the nursing home and wanting to shove both of my feet into piles of icecubes they were so swollen and sore.
    One of these days I am going to go get one of those foot baths. There's a walmart not far away, hmmmm....
  3. by   nurseangel78
    Quote from NurseFirst
    One of these days I am going to go get one of those foot baths. There's a walmart not far away, hmmmm....


    Me too NurseFirst. My feet are aching bad today. Worked as an LPN/CNA today. Got to sit for 10 minutes. I need to go get that pedicure my husband bought me for valentine's I guess. lol.
  4. by   NurseFirst
    1. essential capabilities
      evergreen valley college nursing program students must have abilities and skills of five (5) varieties: cognitive-conceptual, behavioral and social attributes, communication, sensory, and motor. a student should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner without the use of a surrogate. to function effectively and safely the student must be able to do the following:
      1. cognitive-conceptual: critical thinking and clinical judgment are essential abilities of the professional nurse. these abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and synthesis. behavioral and social attributes: students must possess the emotional stability required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities. the prompt completion of all responsibilities inherent to the diagnosis and care of patients and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients are essential. students must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to multitask effectively and efficiently under stress. they must be able to adapt to changing environments; to display flexibility and learn to function effectively, despite the uncertainties inherent in the clinical situations; to interact and establish rapport with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds. compassion, integrity, honesty, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that should be demonstrated throughout the education process. communication: students must be able to speak, to hear and to observe patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications. students must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients, colleagues, and other personnel. communication includes not only speech but also reading and writing. students must be able to communicate in english effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the health care team, patients, and families. (see specific functional requirements.) allowed to begin each subsequent semester. sensory: students must be able to observe a patient accurately. observation necessitates the functional use of the senses of vision, smell, touch, hearing and somatic sensation. (see specific functional requirements.)
      2. motor: students should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other assessment techniques. students should be able to execute gross and fine motor movements required to provide general care and emergency treatment of patients. many actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision. (see specific functional requirements which are based on community standards of health care agencies.)
        these capabilities must be demonstrated in the clinical, laboratory, and theory (classroom) interactions and evaluations.
    2. functional requirements

      the functional requirements described below are representative, but not limited, to those that must be met by an individual to successfully perform the essential functions of a professional nurse.
      1. communication ability:
        • communicate effectively and efficiently in english with patients, families, and other health care providers, both verbally and in writing. (example: explain treatment procedures, teach patients and families, and document in charts.) effectively adapt communication for intended audience. interact, establish rapport with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social emotional, cultural and intellectual backgrounds. assume the role of a health care team member.
        • function effectively under supervision.
      2. sensory capability:

        • coordinate verbal and manual instruction. assess a patient from 10 feet away to observe posture and response to treatment. respond to a timer, alarm or cries for help.
        • auditory, visual, and tactile ability sufficient to assess a patient status and perform treatments. (example: color changes in skin, hear heart and lung sounds.)
      3. motor capability:

        • move from room to room and maneuver in small spaces. transfer patients who may require physical assistance. guard and assist patients with ambulation. perform exercise techniques, including applying resistance during exercise. lift and carry up to 50 pounds, and exert up to 100 pounds force or push/pull. squat, crawl, bend/stoop, reach above shoulder level, use standing balance, and climb stairs use hands repetitively; use manual dexterity. perform cpr. travel to and from academic and clinical sites.
        • able to spend 75%-90% of clinical time standing/ walking.
    Last edit by NurseFirst on Feb 21, '05
  5. by   curleysue
    I actually thought the same thing when I started nursing school cause I have severe problems with the bone in my feet. First of all my right foot was crushed under a 50inch TV that was dropped while trying to move. Now my foot is basically fused together. The bones broke everywhere and now don't move quite that much anymore. I also developed RSD (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy) which I cannot describe how bad that is. I actually went to a wonderful pain doc who did sympathetic nerve blocks in my back which helped my foot heal. Anyways, I have such bad foot pain I mean bad . But even through all of that I still was able to work Med/Surg and Peds plus OB clinicals for 8-10 hours and if you get really good shoes or with me good orthotics from a podiatrist it can help a lot. I found a way to work through the pain and plus sit down whenever possible. Even in with a patient, instead of standing and hovering over them (which is intimidating to peds) I sit next to them or pull up a chair to take a H and P or talk or whatever. Sometimes in clinicals I really like to look through patient charts and you can sit doing that.

    So, I think everyone has pretty much proved the point that yes, you will be on your feet. Some nursing positions maybe a lot less more than others. Like Hospice or Home care. I did that as a CNA before nursing school and it was a lot of companionship, talking and so forth. Read the home health forum and there is a topic of a day in a life as a home health nurse and you pretty much get the gist of what its like.

    I too think your interest in law would be fun to be a nurse attorney. That would be awsome. Plus the pay, really nice! Or I have also heard of forensic nursing which might interest you. I am not sure what exactely you do in this job. But both of these careers require more schooling after nursing school so you would be in school for a while. And you would probably have to go through all the clinicals of regular nursing school. But hey, maybe its worth a try.
    GOOD LUCK. CURLEYSUE
  6. by   curleysue
    Wow, that kinda made me laugh reading this... Now how many nurses do you know actually abid by these requirments?
    :lol_hitti Curleysue I don't think we would have very many nurses? Just kidding...


    Quote from NurseFirst
    1. Essential Capabilities
      Evergreen Valley College Nursing Program students must have abilities and skills of five (5) varieties: Cognitive-Conceptual, Behavioral and Social Attributes, Communication, Sensory, and Motor. A student should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner without the use of a surrogate. To function effectively and safely the student must be able to do the following:
      1. COGNITIVE-CONCEPTUAL: Critical thinking and clinical judgment are essential abilities of the professional nurse. These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and synthesis. BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL ATTRIBUTES: Students must possess the emotional stability required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities. The prompt completion of all responsibilities inherent to the diagnosis and care of patients and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients are essential. Students must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to multitask effectively and efficiently under stress. They must be able to adapt to changing environments; to display flexibility and learn to function effectively, despite the uncertainties inherent in the clinical situations; to interact and establish rapport with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds. Compassion, integrity, honesty, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that should be demonstrated throughout the education process. COMMUNICATION: Students must be able to speak, to hear and to observe patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications. Students must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients, colleagues, and other personnel. Communication includes not only speech but also reading and writing. Students must be able to communicate in English effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the health care team, patients, and families. (See specific Functional Requirements.) allowed to begin each subsequent semester. SENSORY: Students must be able to observe a patient accurately. Observation necessitates the functional use of the senses of vision, smell, touch, hearing and somatic sensation. (See specific Functional Requirements.)
      2. MOTOR: Students should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other assessment techniques. Students should be able to execute gross and fine motor movements required to provide general care and emergency treatment of patients. Many actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision. (See specific Functional Requirements which are based on community standards of health care agencies.)
        These capabilities must be demonstrated in the clinical, laboratory, and theory (classroom) interactions and evaluations.
    2. Functional Requirements

      The Functional Requirements described below are representative, but not limited, to those that must be met by an individual to successfully perform the essential functions of a professional nurse.
      1. Communication Ability:
        • Communicate effectively and efficiently in English with patients, families, and other health care providers, both verbally and in writing. (Example: explain treatment procedures, teach patients and families, and document in charts.) Effectively adapt communication for intended audience. Interact, establish rapport with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social emotional, cultural and intellectual backgrounds. Assume the role of a health care team member.
        • Function effectively under supervision.
      2. Sensory Capability:

        • Coordinate verbal and manual instruction. Assess a patient from 10 feet away to observe posture and response to treatment. Respond to a timer, alarm or cries for help.
        • Auditory, visual, and tactile ability sufficient to assess a patient status and perform treatments. (Example: color changes in skin, hear heart and lung sounds.)
      3. Motor Capability:

        • Move from room to room and maneuver in small spaces. Transfer patients who may require physical assistance. Guard and assist patients with ambulation. Perform exercise techniques, including applying resistance during exercise. Lift and carry up to 50 pounds, and exert up to 100 pounds force or push/pull. Squat, crawl, bend/stoop, reach above shoulder level, use standing balance, and climb stairs Use hands repetitively; use manual dexterity. Perform CPR. Travel to and from academic and clinical sites.
        • Able to spend 75%-90% of clinical time standing/ walking.
  7. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from NurseFirst
    Maybe some NICU, PICU, Peds--while feeding & playing.
  8. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from RN4NICU

    I used to work peds many moons ago. I actually had to laugh at that. Sometimes people just don't know. Feeding and playing, lol!
  9. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from sharonh, rn
    i used to work peds many moons ago. i actually had to laugh at that. sometimes people just don't know. feeding and playing, lol!
    that was my experience in my peds rotation and when i was in picu (which i just finished at a county hospital)--and i don't mean just for my patients (i, personally, did not sit a lot); it's what i noticed happened with the staff rns. like i said, some. certainly not every day and not every patient. infants usually got fed by a nurse who was sitting during the feeding, holding the patient. and we were taught that "playing is the work of children"--and that they have to be really sick to not want to play; i was actually informed by my ci that i needed to spend some time playing with the children (she happens to be a pnp).

    so, since that was my experience, i'd be interested in knowing what your experience was, and how it was different.

    i do notice that that "60% of time" charting that rns rreportedly do seems to usually be done sitting.

    clearly, ymmv.

    thanks,

    nursefirst
    Last edit by NurseFirst on Feb 21, '05
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    ......since we have computer charting nowadays, with those horrible, back-breaking 400lb rollaround machines, even charting meds and nurses' notes is done.....

    Yes folks, you got it....

    on our feet.

    sig........... Face it, if you don't want to be on your feet do not choose to be a nurse. 90% of us are 90% of the time. Yes, even in OB where we "sit all night long and rock babies".....rofl.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 21, '05
  11. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from nursefirst
    that was my experience in my peds rotation and when i was in picu (which i just finished at a county hospital)--and i don't mean just for my patients (i, personally, did not sit a lot); it's what i noticed happened with the staff rns. like i said, some. certainly not every day and not every patient. infants usually got fed by a nurse who was sitting during the feeding, holding the patient. and we were taught that "playing is the work of children"--and that they have to be really sick to not want to play; i was actually informed by my ci that i needed to spend some time playing with the children (she happens to be a pnp).

    so, since that was my experience, i'd be interested in knowing what your experience was, and how it was different.

    i do notice that that "60% of time" charting that rns rreportedly do seems to usually be done sitting.

    clearly, ymmv.

    thanks,

    nursefirst

    i think i may have offended you. i'm sorry, that was not my intention.


    my experience on peds at a county hospital:


    assessments of course.
    meds, po and iv.
    ivf's, tpn, blood transfusions
    tube feedings, ng and gt
    iv insertions and rotations
    lab draws
    dressing changes
    pain meds and other prns
    acuities and care plans
    dealing with anxious parents and clueless docs
    stabilizing or transferring crashing patients or assisting with codes


    parents were expected to stay with their kids, feed them and change their diapers; not all did of course and the cnas took care of those babies. occasionally i fed a baby, it was rare but it happened. we had a playroom and a therapist would come up on day shift and hold sessions for the kids who could participate. occasionally, very late at night i might take a baby or a restless toddler and bring them to the nurses' station with me, very rare. the young teens liked to talk and i would spend time talking to them if i had time.


    i did do my charting sitting; unfortunately it was usually at the end of the shift after i had given report.


    p.s. what does ymmv mean?
    Last edit by SharonH, RN on Feb 21, '05
  12. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I think I may have offended you. I'm sorry, that was not my intention.


    My experience on peds at a county hospital:


    Assessments of course.
    Meds, PO and IV.
    IVF's, TPN, blood transfusions
    Tube feedings, NG and GT
    IV insertions and rotations
    Lab draws
    Dressing changes
    Pain meds and other prns
    Acuities and care plans
    Dealing with anxious parents and clueless docs
    Stabilizing or transferring crashing patients or assisting with codes


    Parents were expected to stay with their kids, feed them and change their diapers; not all did of course and the CNAs took care of those babies. Occasionally I fed a baby, it was rare but it happened. We had a playroom and a therapist would come up on day shift and hold sessions for the kids who could participate. Occasionally, very late at night I might take a baby or a restless toddler and bring them to the nurses' station with me, very rare. The young teens liked to talk and I would spend time talking to them if I had time.


    I did do my charting sitting; unfortunately it was usually at the end of the shift after I had given report.


    P.S. What does YMMV mean?
    Ah, there's the difference! The ped unit I rotated on only had RNs working on it, no aides, no LVNs, so have to do charting throughout the day (VS and such; big flowsheet). YMMV = your mileage may vary.

    Friends?

    NurseFirst
    Last edit by NurseFirst on Feb 21, '05
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I like that; YMMV. good one.

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