How much do you enjoy being a nurse?..pros, cons..quality of life..happiness?

  1. 0
    Hello, im aiming to go into nursing (im a guy btw-just thought i should point that out)....I was wondering for all you nurses out there......can you give me some insight into how you find nursing as a career........pros, cons....are you honestly happy with your decision in becoming a nurse???...how would you say it effects your quality of life (eg..outside work...eg..time for others etc.)...if you could change careers now.....would you?..or stay in nursing?????>...i know this is a lot to ask at once, but feel free to give me any of your thoughts about this........THANKS!!!!!in advance!xx:spin:
  2. 13 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I am 45 and male, I am in the RN program now and I am going to switch my career after twenty years in law enforcement. I believe that this will be the best choice for me and I am really excited to be in this honorable career.
  4. 3
    Ive been an RN for 6 months and so far, so good! I love it. Ive actually had a TON of time with my family, since I work only 3 nights a week. I sleep while the kids are in school and they get home and I wake up and were already to spend some time together.

    Before this i was still in the healthcare field, working five 8hr days and I felt like time with my family, and time with friends was limited. I couldnt go out during the week b/c I usually had to be in a 7am the next day.

    Im glad i made this choice.
  5. 0
    I'm wondering the same.... I know some people who after graduating school only practiced for about a yr and quit nursing altogether..... I'm not sure why....

    Anyways I'm only still a students so I can't really speak for experience but when I got an internship following a Director of Nursing I knew I would love her job

    Does someone know anyone who quit being a nurse and why they came to their decision?
  6. 14
    Nursing is a profession that demands a lot.

    It demands your mind.

    Your heart.

    Your feet.

    Your favorite pen.

    Your closest drug book.

    Your patience.

    Your love.

    Your families good nature.

    Your spouses kindest ear.

    Your forgiveness.

    Your empathy.

    Your faith in humanity.

    Your blind eye.

    Your other cheek.

    Your longest sigh.

    Your deepest breath.

    Your tears.

    Your smiles.

    Your vision.

    Your knowledge.

    Your best shoes.

    Your compassion.

    Your commitment.

    and really in the end, a little bit of your soul, as it will change you in ways you never thought possible.

    For some it is a job, for others a passion, but for all something meaningful, whether viewed as good or bad, positive or negative, hurtful or helpful.

    I personally love being a nurse, and I hate it sometimes too. I work nights, I miss my husband, but at the end of it all I feel I have truly made an impact on someone's world each time I cross back over my threshold and lay my head on my pillow.

    Tait

    PS. Take a little time to search the site and you find many stories of what nursing means to all of us.

    Best of luck!
    2bnursejacksonrn, Indy, shoegalRN, and 11 others like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from Tait
    Nursing is a profession that demands a lot.

    It demands your mind.

    Your heart.

    Your feet.

    Your favorite pen.

    Your closest drug book.

    Your patience.

    Your love.

    Your families good nature.

    Your spouses kindest ear.

    Your forgiveness.

    Your empathy.

    Your faith in humanity.

    Your blind eye.

    Your other cheek.

    Your longest sigh.

    Your deepest breath.

    Your tears.

    Your smiles.

    Your vision.

    Your knowledge.

    Your best shoes.

    Your compassion.

    Your commitment.

    and really in the end, a little bit of your soul, as it will change you in ways you never thought possible.

    For some it is a job, for others a passion, but for all something meaningful, whether viewed as good or bad, positive or negative, hurtful or helpful.

    I personally love being a nurse, and I hate it sometimes too. I work nights, I miss my husband, but at the end of it all I feel I have truly made an impact on someone's world each time I cross back over my threshold and lay my head on my pillow.

    Tait

    PS. Take a little time to search the site and you find many stories of what nursing means to all of us.

    Best of luck!
    :yeahthat: Really can't say it any better.
  8. 1
    Wow, where to begin? Been an RN in ICU for past 4 yrs and was an RT for prior 10 yrs. The 10 yrs as a resp therapist gave me an up close and personal intro to what RN's do, as I would be working closely with them . . . I enjoy being a nurse, get satisfaction from it sometimes (when you see a great save or a textbook outcome from surgery). But, it is not an easy job as you will see if you read some of the other threads on this site.

    The pluses: being thanked by my patients and patient's family for my care; seeing good outcomes and a few miraculous saves; making a patient's last days comfortable

    The minuses: being hit, kicked, and spat on by delirious patients, being harassed by patient's family, being cussed and called names by the same delirious patients, getting no breaks and working past the end of shift without pay, only hearing from management when something goes wrong

    My advice: before jumping into nursing, arrange to shadow RN's in various units for several days so you can see firsthand what we do. Some JC's have a class you can take where this is all arranged. Good luck with your decision.
    Crux1024 likes this.
  9. 0
    we are also students of Nursing, is a fine career but requires much research and learning self-management, social skills required to complement your management team and with the user (patient) .- complicated is that if you do not have the tools to guide you personally. but the race is good and very skin because you can get involved with life and reality of the patient. I hope that helps you in your question and choose the race. good luck. chilean
  10. 0
    Pros: Getting to use my heart, hands, and mind daily in my work. Feeling like science has direct bearing on my every action but I am not working in a lab somewhere (because that is just not my work style). Making a difference, not always in the outcome, but in the way a family experiences a difficult time in their lives. Having a flexible schedule. Not flexible in that you can choose your hours and days week to week but in that there are all types of positions with all types of hours out there. The opportunity but not the requirement to pick up overtime. (This varies place to place). KNOWING that what I do every day matters. The knowledge that if I get tired of being in one place, there are a million other options within nursing that don't require me to go back to school. The knowledge that work can be found anywhere (in a better economy) and that I am not limited to living in one locale forever. Always learning something new. No day is the same as the last. I have learned to communicate with, respect, and on some level understand all sorts of people. Knowing there will never be a time in my career I will stop learning. In my field, getting letters and Christmas cards later on showing you how well the child is doing and/or how much you meant to that family.

    Cons: Working holidays. But really, this isn't that bad. I don't work them all, and my family has adjusted that often we celebrate the day after Christmas or something else like that. Working weekends, but again, not so bad. I really wouldn't trade this now because it gives me some days at home during the week to run errands, relax, etc. Not always being appreciated by patients, families, and management for the way you tirelessly give all your energy toward your work. (Find me a career where you are always appreciated and valued). Sometimes having to carry out courses of action you don't agree with. Having an all too intimate relationship with tragedy.

    My pro list is infinitely longer than my con list. But those cons are a bigger deal for some people than others, so you need to think about what they mean for you. One thing to know is that work conditions and environment vary GREATLY geographically and from facility to facility. You may want to post your question specifically in the forum for your state to find out more about the work environment. I am blessed to work in a part of the country with relatively higher pay and generally good working conditions. It is not for everybody, but I can not imagine doing anything else.
  11. 1
    im a male RN, and i love being a nurse. Nursing is not easy, but its def manageable. Its demanding on all aspects, but the pros outweigh the cons, and we need more representation in the nursing profession
    Canadian eh? likes this.


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