How Much Are You Worth Per Hour? - page 3

Just returned from trip to my mechanic. He charges $50.00 per hour. I am wondering how much you all feel you are worth per hour? Since I am not yet a nurse I will defer to the experts. Gerry... Read More

  1. by   Gompers
    Quote from 1styear
    Sorry I didn't mean for it to sound like I was trashing you, I just get tired of some people in th health field thinking they have the most important positions in life.

    You're still in school. When you start working as an RN, and all those patients' lives are your responsibility, you'll realize why we act this way.

    Yes, there are many jobs out there that indirectly affect peoples' lives and safety, such as mechanics and air traffic controllers. The drivers and pilots have more of a direct hand there.

    But when you're a nurse, sometimes those lives are literally in your hands. Once you push IV cardiac drugs for the first time during a code, you'll understand just how important you are to peoples' lives and safety.

    Just my opinion!
    Last edit by Gompers on Mar 16, '04
  2. by   Gompers
    Hmmmm...how much am I worth?

    Well, on nights when I have a nice assignment, am holding and bottle feeding a baby, getting him ready to go home, joking with his parents about how he's busting out of his preemie diapers...I swear they don't even have to pay me!

    But the night a few months back when that same tiny baby was crashing on me, and I'm pushing a zillion meds and transfusions, and trying to tell his sobbing parents that they really should call the rest of the family in to say goodbye...I don't think you can put a price on that.

    So in the end, I think it all balances out for me.
  3. by   llg
    Quote from stevielynn
    I realize we work short-staffed in unsafe conditions but I'm not sure that equals being paid more. I think it means we need to stop working short-staffed in unsafe working conditions.

    steph

    I really like the way you said that. Thank you.

    llg
  4. by   Dave ARNP
    By my figuring, I'm worth $86.76 qhr, at 50hrs a week.

    I can certainly live with that.



    -Dave
    Last edit by Dave ARNP on Mar 16, '04 : Reason: spelling
  5. by   WyomingRN
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    WAY TO GO WYOMING!!

    I want to know how you do it; you are doing what I DREAM of doing......the money does not motivate me as much as the desire to be self-directed and employed as well as not taking out and out garbage from doctors, aggressive families/patients and greedy self-centered administrators. I really want to be where you are......maybe it's envy , but more, it's admiration I have for people like you making their way and being so happy about it! WAY TO GO!
    Thanks Smiling,

    Actually, I just became autonomous by starting up my own business as an independent contractor specializing in supplying nursing services (being a nurse). In short, I started my own company and then hired myself. I said self, how much do I have to pay you? And self answered, nothing less than $50.

    I still have to deal with the aggressive families and patients - there is no way that you can ever get away from that in nursing. The one redeeming factor is in knowing that you don't have to deal with them on a long term basis, only until your assignment is up. The longest I have been at any one location is a seven day stretch. But by providing good service, I do get called back often.

    I am treated differently by administration and the staff nurses, since I am not under the administration's direct control. I am performing a service for them, - the facility / administration and the staff nurses that are short handed. The nurses show their appreciation by demanding that I am the first one called when they are going to be short handed. Administration knows that if they treat me wrong or don't live up to the contract, I may not return to their facility; or I can raise the rates that I charge them. I still have to follow the policy and procedures of the facility, etc., but I am on a more equal footing with the facility - something all nurses should be in my opinion. While the money is very nice, the best part is being appreciated and having such complete control over my schedule. It is my choice as to how many shifts I take. I try to limit it to no more than 12 or so a month as I like lots of family time.

    As for the Dr.s', since you are not an employee of the hospital, you can tell them that you are a professional same as them and you expect to be treated as such. Had a Dr. that liked to appear at 0615 - 0630 and start to complain about extra pieces of paper in the chart that he thought was unnecessary. One morning after the night from hell on the floor, he started his daily *****ing, I turned around to him and said, "I happen to be busy taking care of your patients, getting their morning meds to them, etc. before the next shift comes out of report. You know as well as I do that the staff nurses don't have any control over what you consider unnecessary papers in the chart. Go take it up with the unit manager, or medical records. If you have a question concerning what is going on with your patient, I would be more than happy to stop what I am doing and address it, other wise, stop taking up my time with your petty complaints." He has ceased giving crap to me or any other nurse about "petty complaints." All the nurses wondered what had gotten into him that he wasn't being an jerk on the floor any more. One day before I left that unit, I confessed that he had pushed my button just one too many times and I told him how the cow eats the cabbage. If he (or anyone one else) wants to write me up, they then open the door to dealing with my hubby who is the one who runs the company that I own. He believes that nurse have a right and obligation to do what is necessary not risk their license.

    L & D that you work is in demand everywhere. You can pretty much write your contacts for what you want in this area.

    There is a ton of information on this in the following threads:
    Independent Nurses providing medical care?
    Post #6 in PRN vs Independent Contract
    Post #30 in Starting An Agency
    Independent Contracting and Protecting Your License
    RN Independent Contractor

    I do hope this information helps you out and gives you ideas. I am helping several others right now who have decided that this is what they want. If you have any questions, hubby and me will be glad to help you get them answered.
  6. by   CCU NRS
    ccu room $1600 dollars a day

    monitoring and equipment $800 dollars a day

    lab tests $320 dollars a day

    x-ray services $400 dollars a day

    a qualified nurse that takes the time and effort to pay attention to your needs and answer questions and alleviate fear and provide safe effective care priceless!!!
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Wyoming, how do I manage to do that in UNIONIZED hospitals, tho????? they are all union here. Is that not about IMPOSSIBLE?
  8. by   WyomingRN
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Wyoming, how do I manage to do that in UNIONIZED hospitals, tho????? they are all union here. Is that not about IMPOSSIBLE?
    My thoughts on that subject are this:

    First, every person has a right to work and provide for their family. This is an essential right of life.

    Second, every person has a right to contract protected by the Constitution.

    Third, even union hospitals use agencies which are nothing more than independent contractor who specialize in supplying nursing services. In essence, that is what you would be. The difference is that instead of hiring a bunch of nurses, you limit the amount of work you take in and do most of it yourself. I have met agency owners who have never even worked in the medical field. If they can make a business out of supplying nursing services, surely a nurse can. Just think how often you find an electrical contracting company owned by a non-electrician; or a plumbing company owned by someone with no experience in plumbing.

    Fourth, while I don't have that problem, I envision lawsuits in the near future against both facilities and unions for civil rights violations. It is just a matter of time. Every week, more and more nurses are becoming autonomous. It is only a matter of time before someone gets tired of union interference with civil rights. No one can speak for you or represent up unless you have given them specific authority.

    A lot of it has to do with how you market your company. Hope this makes sense.

    Of course there is one more option - move to a State like Wyoming.
    Let me know what State your in and I'll see if I can find another independent close to you to see how they are handling it. California has a lot of union influence, but yet, I bet 25 percent of independents are in Calif.
  9. by   Mantibob
    Wow! this sounds great. Do taxes kill you? How would I write my contracts with the hospital? Are there boilerplate contracts I can follow??

    Thanks


    Quote from WyomingRN
    Thanks Smiling,

    Actually, I just became autonomous by starting up my own business as an independent contractor specializing in supplying nursing services (being a nurse). In short, I started my own company and then hired myself. I said self, how much do I have to pay you? And self answered, nothing less than $50.

    I still have to deal with the aggressive families and patients - there is no way that you can ever get away from that in nursing. The one redeeming factor is in knowing that you don't have to deal with them on a long term basis, only until your assignment is up. The longest I have been at any one location is a seven day stretch. But by providing good service, I do get called back often.

    I am treated differently by administration and the staff nurses, since I am not under the administration's direct control. I am performing a service for them, - the facility / administration and the staff nurses that are short handed. The nurses show their appreciation by demanding that I am the first one called when they are going to be short handed. Administration knows that if they treat me wrong or don't live up to the contract, I may not return to their facility; or I can raise the rates that I charge them. I still have to follow the policy and procedures of the facility, etc., but I am on a more equal footing with the facility - something all nurses should be in my opinion. While the money is very nice, the best part is being appreciated and having such complete control over my schedule. It is my choice as to how many shifts I take. I try to limit it to no more than 12 or so a month as I like lots of family time.

    As for the Dr.s', since you are not an employee of the hospital, you can tell them that you are a professional same as them and you expect to be treated as such. Had a Dr. that liked to appear at 0615 - 0630 and start to complain about extra pieces of paper in the chart that he thought was unnecessary. One morning after the night from hell on the floor, he started his daily *****ing, I turned around to him and said, "I happen to be busy taking care of your patients, getting their morning meds to them, etc. before the next shift comes out of report. You know as well as I do that the staff nurses don't have any control over what you consider unnecessary papers in the chart. Go take it up with the unit manager, or medical records. If you have a question concerning what is going on with your patient, I would be more than happy to stop what I am doing and address it, other wise, stop taking up my time with your petty complaints." He has ceased giving crap to me or any other nurse about "petty complaints." All the nurses wondered what had gotten into him that he wasn't being an jerk on the floor any more. One day before I left that unit, I confessed that he had pushed my button just one too many times and I told him how the cow eats the cabbage. If he (or anyone one else) wants to write me up, they then open the door to dealing with my hubby who is the one who runs the company that I own. He believes that nurse have a right and obligation to do what is necessary not risk their license.

    L & D that you work is in demand everywhere. You can pretty much write your contacts for what you want in this area.

    There is a ton of information on this in the following threads:
    Independent Nurses providing medical care?
    Post #6 in PRN vs Independent Contract
    Post #30 in Starting An Agency
    Independent Contracting and Protecting Your License
    RN Independent Contractor

    I do hope this information helps you out and gives you ideas. I am helping several others right now who have decided that this is what they want. If you have any questions, hubby and me will be glad to help you get them answered.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Wyo, I am in WA State.
  11. by   pieWACKet
    well, since we are in a crisis nursing shortage part of a longstanding nursing shortage evident since post WW II, it is clear that nurses are not paid in terms of market demand. If market demand were met, there would not be a shortage.
    As for me, in the urban areas in which I have worked, 50$ /hour is what I think is needed to assure lack of recitivism and continued new labour resource pool.
    Screw the "if I have certification" or "if I work nights" or "if i'm a cardiac specialist"
    My answer for urban areas: basic rate, 50$, the certs, nights, specialties to follow up from there.
  12. by   WyomingRN
    Quote from Mantibob
    Wow! this sounds great. Do taxes kill you? How would I write my contracts with the hospital? Are there boilerplate contracts I can follow??

    Thanks
    Mantibob,

    No on Taxes. Making more $$, I choose to work less shifts; so in the end, taxes are not much different. If you worked the same amount of shifts, it might make a difference. You would want to talk to a CPA and see how to minimize taxes. I set up an LLC instead of a full blown corporation, so I am not paying corp. tax and personal taxes. They are all done on the 1040 long form.

    Yes there are boilerplate contracts you can follow and use. My hubby designed one specifically for that purpose. I use it for all my contracts. He has over 15 years paralegal experience and then took it to my brother (an attorney) to get his input. We have received great response from facility personal on both the structure and content. I've heard that some facilities have there own contract - but remember, everything is negotiable.

    Smiling, I'm going to see if I can locate an independent up in your area. I know there is some up there.
  13. by   Mantibob
    Thanks for the info. Would your husband be willing to sell me a soft copy of the contract and I could modify for my own uses? You can PM me or post here with your answer.

    thanks

    Quote from WyomingRN
    Mantibob,

    No on Taxes. Making more $$, I choose to work less shifts; so in the end, taxes are not much different. If you worked the same amount of shifts, it might make a difference. You would want to talk to a CPA and see how to minimize taxes. I set up an LLC instead of a full blown corporation, so I am not paying corp. tax and personal taxes. They are all done on the 1040 long form.

    Yes there are boilerplate contracts you can follow and use. My hubby designed one specifically for that purpose. I use it for all my contracts. He has over 15 years paralegal experience and then took it to my brother (an attorney) to get his input. We have received great response from facility personal on both the structure and content. I've heard that some facilities have there own contract - but remember, everything is negotiable.

    Smiling, I'm going to see if I can locate an independent up in your area. I know there is some up there.

close