How many of you were CNA's before you went into nursing? - page 4

Good morning...I am considering taking CNA courses in June, and I was wondering how many nurses on this board started out as CNA's before becoming a nurse? Thanks, Cryssi... Read More

  1. by   fairyprincess2003
    I became a CNA before I ever thought of getting my nursing degree. I worked in a nursing home, looking to get some healthcare experience(as a pre-med) I like what the RN's did there, and decided to get my BSN. I think it was a good experience, although I feel CNA's can be very overworked in nursing homes. Good luck.
    PS I also worked as a MOA in a pediatric clinic
  2. by   Purple Princess
    I don't know where to post this so I'll put it here. I got my certification through college but don't have any real work experience other than clinicals in the hospital. I just started part-time at a nursing home on the 7-3 shift; a very busy shift for a beginner plus I'm on the float pool. I'm trying so hard to get things organized and figure out all the residents daily schedules. I'm working with another person and we had about ten patients today. And that was hard; I'm scared to death of not making it on my own and getting fired. I was trying to dress someone who was immobile and it was horrible trying to manipulate her limbs to get a bra, shirt, attends, and her pants were the worst. Trying to get those on a person lying in bed. I'm sweating up a storm tugging the clothes to get them on her without hurting her. And I just was taking a little too long. This is a skilled unit by the way. And there are so many things you have to remember with charting, I and O, who eats in the room who goes in the dining area, who needs help eating etc..... Any advice from experienced aides? My mentor tells me I'm doing okay for this only being my 3rd day at this.
  3. by   debbiemig
    Let me just start by saying this! Give yourself a break! Of all the things I respect most about any nurses aide is her kind caring spirit! Your patients will know, your peers will know and your charge nurses will know!The awkwardness will go away in no time! You will know the charting in no time, it will be like a second nature. I know that floating is the hardest to do, if they start you out on one unit and give you the time to acclimate yourself to the routine, it would be easier. You sound like a kind compassionate person. The facility is so fortunate to have you. I wish we could have more like you! Good luck to you.
    Quote from Purple Princess
    I don't know where to post this so I'll put it here. I got my certification through college but don't have any real work experience other than clinicals in the hospital. I just started part-time at a nursing home on the 7-3 shift; a very busy shift for a beginner plus I'm on the float pool. I'm trying so hard to get things organized and figure out all the residents daily schedules. I'm working with another person and we had about ten patients today. And that was hard; I'm scared to death of not making it on my own and getting fired. I was trying to dress someone who was immobile and it was horrible trying to manipulate her limbs to get a bra, shirt, attends, and her pants were the worst. Trying to get those on a person lying in bed. I'm sweating up a storm tugging the clothes to get them on her without hurting her. And I just was taking a little too long. This is a skilled unit by the way. And there are so many things you have to remember with charting, I and O, who eats in the room who goes in the dining area, who needs help eating etc..... Any advice from experienced aides? My mentor tells me I'm doing okay for this only being my 3rd day at this.
  4. by   suzy253
    A lot of my classmates in nursing schools are presently CNA's going for their RN's.
  5. by   Purple Princess
    i was on the intermediate side tonight. The staff was fairly relaxed in the beggining so I thought good, most of the residents will be able to do some of their own care. Wrong... I'm a newbie and some of them "suddenly" became helpless. My trainer was sick and dragging and the other guy was running around like crazy to keep up. Of our list of 12 people I got 7 and showered another. so 8 really and my trainer got 5 and then the other guy had his 12 and I tried my hardest to help him. Plus people needed fed, vitals. water pitchers, and plenty of BM cleanups. My trainer ended up going home early sick. So I tried my hardest to get the remainder of the residents ready for bed. Then the guy went to do the charting and I answered a call light and did last checks. I come in the room and she is a mess of BM. I try to clean what I can and seems I'm making more of a mess trying to clean up a mess. She was large and I had to get my partner to roll her and she was getting agitated. We get her cleaned up then she wanted this and that and things in "just the right spot" and I finally had to tell her it was getting late past 11a and our shift was done. So if she needed something else she would have to ring her bell and another aide would come in. I explained as nicely as I could I've been there all evening I can't spend the night in there with her. I wanted to go home. My shower took an hour because of endless tasks and "babying". I'm terrified of being on my own. What do you do to make things go faster and more smoothly?
  6. by   S.N. Visit
    yes, I was!

    I started my first job in the dietary dept of a nursing home as a teenager. At age 18, I got my CNA. I worked as a cna for a few years then decided to go to cosmetology school. (I daydreamed of having the nursing home's hairstyling job.) Then I quit hairstyling due to burn out and to raise my family. Now I'm going back into nursing .
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I WAS a candy striper prior to going to nursing school, I should add. LPN school first, then RN school. Waaaay back in the dark ages...LOL!

    A bit off topic, but I wonder if today's RN programs still start their student nurses' training with CNA duties? CNA bedside/physical care is the most basic of nursing practice and should be included , IMO. Some new RN grads today have an unbelievable lack of experience in the most basic of the nursing functions. And they feel above it as well.

    Perhaps this is why I tend to get along fine with LPN's and PCT's in my practice...I can directly relate to their jobs as I have DONE (and still can DO) their jobs. When RN's have an 'attitude' they are above the other nursing disciplines, it effects the workplace negatively. I dislike working with these types of RN's...they are NOT team players. This attitude breeds divisiveness in the same way some BSN proponents breed hostility and divisiveness amongst RN ranks.

    When will we have solidarity? I hope to live to see it. Until then we have to do the best we can one person at a time in the attitudes we project.
  8. by   debbiemig
    Wow! You said a mouthful about RN's who feel " above" doing any hands on nursing care. You are so right about it affecting the workplace negatively! I have a DON who has too many letters after her name. She flaunts it and makes sure everyone knows it. She treats LPNs with such disrespect, it is so hard to work in this environment! I have 33 years in the place, and am looking forward to retiring early. It makes me so sad to know that our administration allows her to treat longtime devoted employees so poorly.She has even driven all but one of our supervisors to quit, our most recent one today! It amazes me to see that one person can pull the facility moral down! Anyone out there with similar circumstances?



    Quote from mattsmom81
    I WAS a candy striper prior to going to nursing school, I should add. LPN school first, then RN school. Waaaay back in the dark ages...LOL!

    A bit off topic, but I wonder if today's RN programs still start their student nurses' training with CNA duties? CNA bedside/physical care is the most basic of nursing practice and should be included , IMO. Some new RN grads today have an unbelievable lack of experience in the most basic of the nursing functions. And they feel above it as well.

    Perhaps this is why I tend to get along fine with LPN's and PCT's in my practice...I can directly relate to their jobs as I have DONE (and still can DO) their jobs. When RN's have an 'attitude' they are above the other nursing disciplines, it effects the workplace negatively. I dislike working with these types of RN's...they are NOT team players. This attitude breeds divisiveness in the same way some BSN proponents breed hostility and divisiveness amongst RN ranks.

    When will we have solidarity? I hope to live to see it. Until then we have to do the best we can one person at a time in the attitudes we project.
  9. by   rnmaven
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I WAS a candy striper prior to going to nursing school, I should add. LPN school first, then RN school. Waaaay back in the dark ages...LOL!

    A bit off topic, but I wonder if today's RN programs still start their student nurses' training with CNA duties? CNA bedside/physical care is the most basic of nursing practice and should be included , IMO. Some new RN grads today have an unbelievable lack of experience in the most basic of the nursing functions. And they feel above it as well.

    Perhaps this is why I tend to get along fine with LPN's and PCT's in my practice...I can directly relate to their jobs as I have DONE (and still can DO) their jobs. When RN's have an 'attitude' they are above the other nursing disciplines, it effects the workplace negatively. I dislike working with these types of RN's...they are NOT team players. This attitude breeds divisiveness in the same way some BSN proponents breed hostility and divisiveness amongst RN ranks.

    When will we have solidarity? I hope to live to see it. Until then we have to do the best we can one person at a time in the attitudes we project.
    Your "off topic" part of your post should be posted as a new discussion! That will open a can of worms!

    Here's what it all comes down to..........from a former Nursing assistant, unit clerk, diploma grad, BSN grad and now 27 years later.....MSN student.

    CREDIBILITY!!

    It doesn't matter how many degrees you have after your name......if you can't understand and do the job at a basic level........how are you going to lead?

    I have run workshops for nurse "leaders" and unfortunately, I believe it's like preaching to the choir.........those who attend are on the same page.......those who do not attend are in their own little, self-important worlds.

    I have posted my thoughts on the education aspect of nursing before.........the reason we need to advance our educations is to increase respect for the profession. How can we expect to interact effectively with other allied health professionals who have Masters degrees as their entry level into the profession when we are mostly working in the hospital without even BSN?

    My son is looking at Physical Therapy for a career and most of the programs have gone to Doctorate in PT.

    I'm not saying this is entirely right.........part of this education fury is about keeping the colleges in business too!

    I do agree that unfortunately, MOST of the nursing adminstrators who gain these advanced degrees did so because they DID NOT enjoy nursing........that is the true essence of nursing.........caring for patients at the bedside.

    But back to credibility..........Is you want to gain respect from those who work with you, you have to have credibility........in nursing this INCLUDES being able to function at the bedside..........maybe.......God forbid.........pitch in and HELP a little! Transport a patient........start an IV..........run a CODE effectively. That might be a novel concept!

    When you say that you "get along" with the LPN's and PTC's it's because they RESPECT you........and respect comes from credibility.

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